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Question...what's your HONEST opinion?

Posted

Has 7 years experience.

Ok...my question is this, with the economy being what it is, and jobs being hard to obtain...do you feel that a thin nurse would have a better chance at a job than an overweight nurse...even if the overweight nurse is great at what she does, and graduated top of her class.

Please give me your opinions. Thanks!

depends on what is your idea of what is thin and overweight. there are some ppl who I would classify as thin that others would view as overweight vice versa.

do you mean an obese person? because frankly, I do think obese nurses set a bad example

I would hope not but who is to say it wouldn't happen? It shouldn't happen. However, I have read studies about this happening outside of healthcare. Apparently it is not always a conscious thing (so they say). Then again people also say that about not even interviewing people with foreign sounding names.

depends on what is your idea of what is thin and overweight. there are some ppl who I would classify as thin that others would view as overweight vice versa.

do you mean an obese person? because frankly, I do think obese nurses set a bad example

Hmmm...Even though I am not obese/overweight but I confess that your remark makes me wince.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

Honest opionion? ... only if the person were significantly overweight and it appeared to interfere with her agility and physical stamina. I don't think "slightly" or even "moderately" overweight would make much difference.

However ... if it were seen as interfering with her movement and stamina ... and likely of having health problems or injuries ... yes.

Obese person here - with normal BP, low overall cholesterol, high HDL, no diabetes or insulin resistance and a lovely attitude about life :loveya:

I know that sometimes fat folks are discriminated against, even in jobs, but I am who I am and I'm health as a horse (even while being the same size).

I also exercise everyday - okay well most days - sometimes school gets in the way. Maybe we need to realize we don't have all the answers, and accept people as they are.

I've worked with diabetic patients who are seriously overweight/obese and helped them make better food choices for their diabetes. Did they lose a ton of weight - no, were they healthier and had more diabetic control - absolutely.

I'd love to have the regimen of Biggest Loser, but I don't, oh well.

Am I still going to be a great nurse - of course.

tfleuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 10 years experience.

I honestly think that a manager is going to pick whomever they think is best suited for the position. If the position requires someone with a strong academic background, then the one with the better transcript will probably be chosen. If the position requires someone who is agile and quick on his or her feet, then the person who appears to fit that bill will be chosen. If the position doesn't strongly require one over the other, than I think a lot more will go into the process than size and grades.

Nobody wants to believe that weight will keep someone from being hired for a particular position. Nobody wants to believe that the "A" student will always be accepted over the "C" student either. Sometimes it happens, and sometimes it's not even a factor. Like so many other things in life: it depends.

I don't think and hope that never happens. Kind of a weird thought, IMO...lol.

9livesRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in SNU/SNF/MedSurg, SPCU Ortho/Neuro/Spine. Has 2 years experience.

To tell you the truth, i have seen the the "chubby" ones walking faster, and doing a lot for their pts. and most of them are just as if not more than agile then the others.

lol on a side note, i find chubby nurses to be funnier, to have more patients with students, and to kinda show you extra on clinicals!!!

lol it is funny to say but the skinny ones that came across my way maybe 50% were kinda nasty (attitude).

nothing against no body... it is just funny when i got to think about it!!!

well i think that knowlege, experience, will and care, does not matter on one's weight!

so... i dont quite think it matters, its a blend!

i have seen "skinny turtles" and "fat bunnies" out there!

I was once told that with qualifications being equal between applicants that the decision of who got the job and who didn't was based on the rapport with the interviewer. So I guess if the interviewer has a prejudice against chubby/full-figured/large/obese/whatever nurses then the interviewer might want to go with the thinner/slimmer/whatever nurse and vice versa.

But I guess the point I'm trying to make is that I think a lot more goes into the decision (experience/work ethic/job requirements) than just someone's weight.

Purple_Scrubs, BSN, RN

Specializes in School Nursing. Has 8 years experience.

I would HOPE that this would not happen any more than someone being not offerred a job because of their skin color, or country of origin, or gender, or sexual orientation, or age. However, weight discrimination seems to be one of the last accepted biases.

ssullyorthoRN

Specializes in LTC, Orthopedics. Has 4 years experience.

If you can pass a pre-employment physical than your weight should not be an issue.

SunRose7

Specializes in Med/Surg/Ortho/Uro/Rehab CNA.

i think its ridiculous that it should even be a issue but i'm sure that some interviewers have that type of prejudice. i myself am a skinny short individual and have had more than an eyebrow or two raised when i say i can transfer someone, literally, twice my size. which i can! sooo, other end of the spectrum maybe. lesson learned: never judge a book by its cover. i met a great friend who weighs more than i do & i love her to pieces! she is such a good person & very smart!

i would also have to agree that a lot of the "heavier" nurses have a better sense of humor and are very intellegent. i personally know more heavy nurses that i would want to take care of me than the snooty, skinny little snots... lol what does that say about me? i dont know, i pray i will never be like that.

can be a touchy subject huh?

tfleuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 10 years experience.

What I don't understand is why when people are trying to argue agaisnt prejudices based on one thing (weight, race, gpa, ect.) they start making comments about those who fall into the other opposite end of the spectrum. Skinny nurses tend to be meaner; "A" students are cold and lack people or clincal skills, ect. If a certain behavior or ability level can't be tied to one group, then it can't be tied to the other. I haven't found any correlation between weight and competency/compassion/intelligence.

This is a great question; I just got accepted to nursing school and I am doing a self battle with my weight; I would be considered obese; I am very active and have tried a lot of things to lose weight. I will be a great nurse but have the stigma of being so over weight how are the patients going to take me serious

Alternator81

Specializes in 5th Semester - Graduation Dec '09!.

I see nurses that are pretty big and have all sorts of knee problems. They waddle to a patient's room and are out of breath by the time they return to the nurses station. I think to myself (1) How do they make it through a 12-hour shift and (2) what happens if there is a patient emergency.

People come in all shapes and sizes and I think discrimination is wrong. But I also believe that it's unsafe to work bedside if you are unable to move quickly.

I see nurses that are pretty big and have all sorts of knee problems. They waddle to a patient's room and are out of breath by the time they return to the nurses station. I think to myself (1) How do they make it through a 12-hour shift and (2) what happens if there is a patient emergency.

People come in all shapes and sizes and I think discrimination is wrong. But I also believe that it's unsafe to work bedside if you are unable to move quickly.

Well yeah, but skinny and fit aren't the same thing either. So, yes I think we can agree that nurses should be able to physically work their shift. The problem is, that you can't tell that by someone's weight...(that anecdotal evidence is so attractive, yet unreliable).

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

What I don't understand is why when people are trying to argue agaisnt prejudices based on one thing (weight, race, gpa, ect.) they start making comments about those who fall into the other opposite end of the spectrum. Skinny nurses tend to be meaner; "A" students are cold and lack people or clincal skills, ect. If a certain behavior or ability level can't be tied to one group, then it can't be tied to the other. I haven't found any correlation between weight and competency/compassion/intelligence.

While I understand and completely agree with your overall point, I also have to grin because when I see posts like yours, they always point out the one side as well, like in the grade thread, it also kept being said that C students were lazy, weren't go getters, lacked this or that, and so on. But you only bring up the Skinny Comments, and the A comments. This isn't even pointed directly at you so much, as I am just making a general observation. In the other thread there were a lot more negative assumptions made about C students then A students, but it's always "one" group that stands out to a particular person while the other judgments seem to just be ignored.

I am really curious as to why this is. I don't think it can really be answered though.

Again, this is not an attack on you, your post just sparked a trend I have noticed in these types of threads from all sides.

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