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Please...please...Help

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by Prernafraid Prernafraid (New) New Student

Prernafraid specializes in 6 yrs CNA. Float pool NA (ER, Med,Surg, Pulm/Renal.

304 Profile Views; 8 Posts

You are reading page 3 of Please...please...Help. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

NICUmiiki has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU/PICU Flight Nursing.

1,755 Posts; 25,619 Profile Views

If you were accepted you're at least the average nursing student. They didn't accept a bunch of people way smarter and you. You guys are all at the same level You (and all of the others accepted) are incompetent because you should be. You aren't a nurse, so no one expects you to be at that level yet.

Look up imposter syndrome. It sounds like you have it. 

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443 Posts; 13,087 Profile Views

If they do have a question about chemistry on a test, don't worry, the would have gone over it in class. I didn't have chem either.  Learn your notes word for word.

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melissamabd has 40 years experience as a DNP, RN and specializes in Nursing Ed, Med Errors.

27 Posts; 805 Profile Views

Hi-- I'm a nursing professor with 40 years of nursing experience.  I teach pharmacology, fundamentals, med-surg, and psychiatric nursing.

I'm not sure why any RN would state they don't need chemistry to function; makes me wonder what they do at work.

Here are some places where chemistry is used in nursing:

  • fluid and electrolytes-- basically applied chemistry in the human body. You will need to understand Na+ and K+; ionization, movement across membranes and factors which influence the process-- which are virtually all biologic processes.  
  • renal function-- great deal of chemistry there.
  • respiratory function-- again, chemistry of gases/movement and how it goes awry. 
  • pharmacology-- all chemistry; it's the use of chemicals to influence s/s/health. 
  • GI processes-- chemistry in effect once again; for instance, the use of hypertonic fluids to move fluid into the bowel (FLeets enema) and how this works. 
  • metabolic disorders such as diabetic ketoacidosis, rhabdomyolosis are also chemistry-related illnesses. 

It's the nurse's responsibility to understand all this and more-- and apply the nursing process of assessment/intervention/evaluation to the same. This is true in all settings, for all patients, all disorders. 

I think you may find some concepts unfamiliar during school; be mindful of this and prepare to get tutoring as needed.  

Last thing: of course you are no less capable than anyone else.  That's rubbish.  However, practical experience as a nurse's aide, while helpful with comfort in clinical settings, does not prepare RNs.  Nursing school does; and in that clinical environment, you will assess patients, teach them about their disorders and treatments;  and intervene as a nurse. You will also be expected to abstain from carrying out orders if they're not safe.  That's quite a judgment to make-- not the judgment of a tech.  It's quite different from helping with ADLs.

 

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ArmyRntoMD is a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

314 Posts; 652 Profile Views

20 minutes ago, melissamabd said:

Hi-- I'm a nursing professor with 40 years of nursing experience.  I teach pharmacology, fundamentals, med-surg, and psychiatric nursing.

I'm not sure why any RN would state they don't need chemistry to function; makes me wonder what they do at work.

Here are some places where chemistry is used in nursing:

  • fluid and electrolytes-- basically applied chemistry in the human body. You will need to understand Na+ and K+; ionization, movement across membranes and factors which influence the process-- which are virtually all biologic processes.  
  • renal function-- great deal of chemistry there.
  • respiratory function-- again, chemistry of gases/movement and how it goes awry. 
  • pharmacology-- all chemistry; it's the use of chemicals to influence s/s/health. 
  • GI processes-- chemistry in effect once again; for instance, the use of hypertonic fluids to move fluid into the bowel (FLeets enema) and how this works. 
  • metabolic disorders such as diabetic ketoacidosis, rhabdomyolosis are also chemistry-related illnesses. 

It's the nurse's responsibility to understand all this and more-- and apply the nursing process of assessment/intervention/evaluation to the same. This is true in all settings, for all patients, all disorders. 

I think you may find some concepts unfamiliar during school; be mindful of this and prepare to get tutoring as needed.  

Last thing: of course you are no less capable than anyone else.  That's rubbish.  However, practical experience as a nurse's aide, while helpful with comfort in clinical settings, does not prepare RNs.  Nursing school does; and in that clinical environment, you will assess patients, teach them about their disorders and treatments;  and intervene as a nurse. You will also be expected to abstain from carrying out orders if they're not safe.  That's quite a judgment to make-- not the judgment of a tech.  It's quite different from helping with ADLs.

 

I agree that a chemistry understanding is essential. I wonder why nursing is pushing towards all of this “community nursing/nursing theory” packed BSN rather than organic and biochemistry as well as physics. Until I started premed I had none of these, and my nursing program only required a simple high school chemistry. Since taking these courses I understand many things we do in a nursing setting in much greater depth. THIS is what would help strengthen nursing.  

(It turns out many nursing programs don’t even require general bio! Just A+P, and micro!)

Edited by ArmyRntoMD

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1 Article; 167 Posts; 3,877 Profile Views

5 hours ago, melissamabd said:

Hi-- I'm a nursing professor with 40 years of nursing experience.  I teach pharmacology, fundamentals, med-surg, and psychiatric nursing.

I'm not sure why any RN would state they don't need chemistry to function; makes me wonder what they do at work.

Here are some places where chemistry is used in nursing:

  • fluid and electrolytes-- basically applied chemistry in the human body. You will need to understand Na+ and K+; ionization, movement across membranes and factors which influence the process-- which are virtually all biologic processes.  
  • renal function-- great deal of chemistry there.
  • respiratory function-- again, chemistry of gases/movement and how it goes awry. 
  • pharmacology-- all chemistry; it's the use of chemicals to influence s/s/health. 
  • GI processes-- chemistry in effect once again; for instance, the use of hypertonic fluids to move fluid into the bowel (FLeets enema) and how this works. 
  • metabolic disorders such as diabetic ketoacidosis, rhabdomyolosis are also chemistry-related illnesses. 

It's the nurse's responsibility to understand all this and more-- and apply the nursing process of assessment/intervention/evaluation to the same. This is true in all settings, for all patients, all disorders. 

I think you may find some concepts unfamiliar during school; be mindful of this and prepare to get tutoring as needed.  

Last thing: of course you are no less capable than anyone else.  That's rubbish.  However, practical experience as a nurse's aide, while helpful with comfort in clinical settings, does not prepare RNs.  Nursing school does; and in that clinical environment, you will assess patients, teach them about their disorders and treatments;  and intervene as a nurse. You will also be expected to abstain from carrying out orders if they're not safe.  That's quite a judgment to make-- not the judgment of a tech.  It's quite different from helping with ADLs.

 

Yes, you have 40 years as a nursing professor experience.....but how many years ago did you take Chemistry at a university though? With all due respect, as someone who has taken General Chemistry/Organic Chemistry in the last 3-4 years, I can promise you, nothing you learn in those classes have anything to do with being a nurse. 

If you want, I could send you a syllabus of how an introductory general chemistry 1 course is like. It's nothing but math, random equations about stoichiometry, how to balance equations, and more math. 

I believe you are confusing those topics you are referring to such as acid/base, renal, GI as something you learn in your A&P classes. A&P is 1000x more useful to a nurse than a chemistry class. Why does a nurse need to learn how to balance an equation or learn how to figure out how many moles in a molecule? 

There is a class for that; it's called Biochemistry; and thats why premeds take it, not PRE-nursing students.

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1 Article; 167 Posts; 3,877 Profile Views

5 hours ago, melissamabd said:

Hi-- I'm a nursing professor with 40 years of nursing experience.  I teach pharmacology, fundamentals, med-surg, and psychiatric nursing.

I'm not sure why any RN would state they don't need chemistry to function; makes me wonder what they do at work.

Here are some places where chemistry is used in nursing:

  • fluid and electrolytes-- basically applied chemistry in the human body. You will need to understand Na+ and K+; ionization, movement across membranes and factors which influence the process-- which are virtually all biologic processes.  
  • renal function-- great deal of chemistry there.
  • respiratory function-- again, chemistry of gases/movement and how it goes awry. 
  • pharmacology-- all chemistry; it's the use of chemicals to influence s/s/health. 
  • GI processes-- chemistry in effect once again; for instance, the use of hypertonic fluids to move fluid into the bowel (FLeets enema) and how this works. 
  • metabolic disorders such as diabetic ketoacidosis, rhabdomyolosis are also chemistry-related illnesses. 

It's the nurse's responsibility to understand all this and more-- and apply the nursing process of assessment/intervention/evaluation to the same. This is true in all settings, for all patients, all disorders. 

I think you may find some concepts unfamiliar during school; be mindful of this and prepare to get tutoring as needed.  

Last thing: of course you are no less capable than anyone else.  That's rubbish.  However, practical experience as a nurse's aide, while helpful with comfort in clinical settings, does not prepare RNs.  Nursing school does; and in that clinical environment, you will assess patients, teach them about their disorders and treatments;  and intervene as a nurse. You will also be expected to abstain from carrying out orders if they're not safe.  That's quite a judgment to make-- not the judgment of a tech.  It's quite different from helping with ADLs.

 

Yes, you have 40 years as a nursing professor experience.....but how many years ago did you take Chemistry at a university though? With all due respect, as someone who has taken General Chemistry/Organic Chemistry in the last 3-4 years, I can promise you, nothing you learn in those classes have anything to do with being a nurse. 

If you want, I could send you a syllabus of how an introductory general chemistry 1 course is like. It's nothing but math, random equations about stoichiometry, how to balance equations, and more math. 

I believe you are confusing those topics you are referring to such as acid/base, renal, GI as something you learn in your A&P classes. A&P is 1000x more useful to a nurse than a chemistry class. Why does a nurse need to learn how to balance an equation or learn how to figure out how many moles in a molecule? 

There is a class for that; it's called Biochemistry; and thats why premeds take it, not PRE-nursing students. 

OP, you don't need Chemistry to be a nurse; take it from someone who has taken Chem 1, Chem 2, Ochem, etc.

Edited by carti

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