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Online Degree vs. University Degree

Nurses   (3,159 Views 13 Comments)
by commonsense commonsense (Member)

commonsense has 2 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse.

12,989 Visitors; 442 Posts

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Good evening everyone, I am an ADN student nurse down in the lone star state and I'm a virgin to allnurses so please be gentle. I'm scheduled to graduate at the end of 2011 and while I'm still concentrating on my current schooling I can't help but to think about the future. I'm looking to enter a 1 year BSN program within a year or so of graduating my current schooling. It would work out best for me if I was to get my BSN and eventually a MSN online. My question is when you are applying for jobs that require advanced training do the prospective employers look down on nurses who have done their training online?

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In short: yes.

In a few more words: Not always.

If you're getting a MSN to be a APRN, you will not get out of having to do clinical time. You will NOT be able to do it all online.

Most bridge programs require clinical time as well. I don't think all do.

Personally, I'd be wary of any program that does not require you to demonstrate proficiency outside of written tests.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

3 Followers; 113,023 Visitors; 13,086 Posts

No, generally speaking they do not. Clinicals are still done locally, and employers don't seem to care if one does their didactics in a brick-and-mortar, or online.

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BluegrassRN has 14 years experience and works as a medical floor RN.

21,534 Visitors; 1,188 Posts

My program has online theory and onsite clinicals, as do all accredited online programs.

Thing is, my degree will be from a state university. It doesn't say what percentage of my classes are online. It doesn't differentiate at all between the classroom taught classes vs the online taught classes.

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Moogie works as a GRA.

1 Article; 22,212 Visitors; 1,796 Posts

:hrns&wlcm:

As you explore AllNurses.com, you will find several forums that might help you in your decision. You can check out the student forums

https://allnurses.com/nursing-student/

particularly the General Student Discussions

https://allnurses.com/general-nursing-student/

and Distance Learning

https://allnurses.com/distance-learning-nursing/

as well as the Registered Nurses: Diploma, ADN or BSN? forum

https://allnurses.com/registered-nurses-diploma/

You may not necessarily have to choose between one or the other because many nursing programs are offering online classes, especially for RN to BSN bridges and graduate coursework. You may also want to make a post in your state nursing school forum to see what might be available in your immediate area. You have so many options for your further education! But the downside is that all the choices can be baffling at times, so feel free to ask questions and check out previous or current threads.

I like your user name. You do have a lot of common sense to be checking this out while you're still in your ADN program. :up:

Best wishes on your educational journey, and again, welcome!

Moogie

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commonsense has 2 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse.

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I'm aware I'm not going to get out of clinicals, but I see that as a good thing because from my experience so far thats where the real learning takes place, the other stuff I can get out of a book or an article. BluegrassRN, do you know if your program is rare in that it does not differentiate online and onsite, or a that a somewhat common thing?

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8,364 Visitors; 839 Posts

Oh, sorry! You said something about doing your training online. I associate training with "Hands on" experience, rather than didactic "training."

If that's the case, then no, I don't think anyone looks down on that too much. I'm sure some hiring manager somewhere does, but not most. At least in regard to the RN bridge to BSN.

As for the MSN, I don't really know, but I, personally, think it would be. (This is assuming that ALL classes were online)

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558 Visitors; 6 Posts

Personaly, I am not only a CNA/Phlebotomist and a lifelong type one diabetic so ive been around hundreds or nurses and a few dozen Dr's and sence im in the LVN program in your Loan Star State 7th generation as well I can tell you that every time I asked Dr's if they prefered one over the other they all replied by saying that they do not care...what they do care about is experence in the medical feild...online or not they didnt seem to care. So was that gentle? lol

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commonsense has 2 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse.

12,989 Visitors; 442 Posts

After pondering all the replies that I've gotten as well as some previous information I'm going to conclude that It makes a very slight difference. I'm sure if the employers had their choice they would prefer onsite didactic work but I'm thinking it won't make a world of difference. Last but not least I want to personally thank Moogie for the welcome banner which put a smile on my face, and everyone who has replied and continues to do so with valuable information.

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nursejoy1 has 22 years experience as a ASN, RN and works as a Education Director LTC RN.

1 Article; 6,193 Visitors; 213 Posts

I have been pondering similar decisions and my main advice would be to ensure that wherever you get your degree is acredited. I was an LPN for 9 years and recently got my RN through an online program at a local community college. The clinicals were at hospitals near us. There was an on campus class that graduated along with us. The online class all passed NCLEX on the first try, on campus class- 3 or 4 failed and will have to retake. Online is pretty much what you make it and in my experience was much more challenging than ANY class I have taken on campus! Good luck!

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LaxNP has 10 years experience as a DNP and works as a NP.

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Online classes and programs are very popular these days. Big name schools are offering online programs. I've seen UNC, UMass, and I believe JHU and others. One of the great things about doing a program like this is you can really focus more on your goals since many programs make you find your own clinical sites.

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HouTx has 35 years experience and works as a Manager, eLearning & Clinical Development.

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The issue is not the method of educational delivery (online, distance, self study, classroom, etc) but the quality of the curriculum and instruction. Commercial schools (frequently referred to as "for profit") have a different primary goal -- to make a profit for their investors/shareholders. Traditional (not for profit) schools have an entirely different focus. For instance, commercial school faculty are treated like temporary itinerant workers rather than educational professionals. This is particularly evident at the graduate level, where a scholarly environment is a very critical factor in the development of higher level intellectual performance. Degrees from traditional programs are preferred by hiring managers.

I would advise the OP to stick to a well-respected college or university to advance her education -- most of them also have online delivery methods for their didactic nursing classes. Make sure the school is regionally accredited as a whole - this will determine whether credits are accepted by other schools.

As for the PP who said "everytime I asked Drs whether they preferred one over the other they all replied that they don't care" - LOL. Physicians don't understand the scope of nursing practice - or how they are educated, so this is no surprise.

Edited by HouTx
typo

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