He Wanted to Practice Satanism for the Baby

  1. Yes you read the title correctly and I can't make this up.
    I am currently finishing up nursing school and had my last OB clinical rotation yesterday. We had the night shift (4-11p) and everything was going fine, one vaginal birth and a healthy newborn arrived. After taking the baby to get bathed per the mother's request, we give the baby back so she can feed them.

    Shortly after, the dad arrives and tell us to put oil on the baby. Mind you, the mother had already told us that the dad was a drug addict and was supposed to be in rehab but wanted to see the birth of his baby, so she allowed him in with supervision of staff.

    Here's where it gets crazy, the dad brings out a bottle of substance in a flask with a skull head and snakes surrounding it (kind of like the flask from "Little Nicky).
    The mom, of course, immediately said no and to escort him out but he wouldn't leave so we had to call security.

    Before security came he started speaking in a deep voice and his eyes started rolling back, that's when we got the mom and baby to safety while he stayed in the room chanting something about Satan and satanism.

    The reason why I'm telling this story is to ask if this happens regularly in nursing. This was something I had never seen before.

    I was like:

  2. Visit Shookclays profile page

    About Shookclays

    Joined: Sep '16; Posts: 160; Likes: 208

    40 Comments

  3. by   J.Adderton
    I have not had this specific experience, but I have had times security intervention was needed. A few examples, family members/patient arguing, yelling, a couple having sex in the patients bed while she was gone for MRI. Narcotics (nonprescribed) found in room. Sorry you had to go through this.. there will be other situations but far between.
  4. by   Shookclays
    Quote from Stepper
    I have not had this specific experience, but I have had times security intervention was needed. A few examples, family members/patient arguing, yelling, a couple having sex in the patients bed while she was gone for MRI. Narcotics (nonprescribed) found in room. Sorry you had to go through this.. there will be other situations but far between.
    Thank you. It wasn't such a bad experience as it was eye opening. Nurses experience so much due to us being the only ones there 24/7. It amazed me though and I was so happy when the mommy and baby was put out of potential harms way.
  5. by   vanilla bean
    I've also not had that specific experience, but I've seen plenty of situations that require security and/or banning a baby's parent or family member(s) from the hospital. It seems like emotions run particularly high and opinions are particularly strong regarding a new baby.
  6. by   K+MgSO4
    Families are strange....a man dying, actually actively dying of liver failure and his family asking about alcohol rehab.....physiotherapist daughter of 90 year old with dementia demanding daily PT for her father with a #NOF (turns out she was a post natal physio).
    My favourite was the daughter who refused IV fluids for her mother until the naturopath approved it....3 day weekend. Call to OPA on the Saturday and a massive family meeting.....
  7. by   KatieMI
    Not even close to many strange things I observed. There are just three simple rules:

    - families can do/ask whatever;
    - if what they want is impossible, tell them so;
    - if what they want is dangerous, tell them so;
    - and everyone of them must be in agreement

    If any of the above doesn't fit into, inform your higher-ups and call security. Then document. Done.

    Otherwise, one time we had Native American elder dying on comfort care and his grandon brought a dead hare to be kept under bed. I kind of knew why he wanted it there and decided that, as long as nobody is bothered and family and patient feel more comfortable for just a few hours, then so be it. I just asked the guy to put it in plastic bag, with what he had no problem, and also where he got it. Now, when I am in mood for German hare in pepper sauce or other game meat, I just need to make a phone call
  8. by   Wuzzie
    When I worked in NICU we had a dad who wanted to take his moribund infant son outside and lift him to the moon a la "The Lion King". Since it wasn't going to affect the outcome we did it. Dad arrived in full cultural dress (not sure the name of it and don't want to offend). It ended up being rather moving.
  9. by   Shookclays
    Quote from K+MgSO4
    Families are strange....a man dying, actually actively dying of liver failure and his family asking about alcohol rehab.....physiotherapist daughter of 90 year old with dementia demanding daily PT for her father with a #NOF (turns out she was a post natal physio).
    My favourite was the daughter who refused IV fluids for her mother until the naturopath approved it....3 day weekend. Call to OPA on the Saturday and a massive family meeting.....
    I've always wondered but is it specific to the facility or the state in terms of what to do if a "family decision" will cause harm for the patient.

    Quote from KatieMI
    Not even close to many strange things I observed. There are just three simple rules:

    - families can do/ask whatever;
    - if what they want is impossible, tell them so;
    - if what they want is dangerous, tell them so;
    - and everyone of them must be in agreement

    If any of the above doesn't fit into, inform your higher-ups and call security. Then document. Done.

    Otherwise, one time we had Native American elder dying on comfort care and his grandon brought a dead hare to be kept under bed. I kind of knew why he wanted it there and decided that, as long as nobody is bothered and family and patient feel more comfortable for just a few hours, then so be it. I just asked the guy to put it in plastic bag, with what he had no problem, and also where he got it. Now, when I am in mood for German hare in pepper sauce or other game meat, I just need to make a phone call
    Hahaha! Oh my goodness!
  10. by   Shookclays
    Quote from Wuzzie
    When I worked in NICU we had a dad who wanted to take his moribund infant son outside and lift him to the moon a la "The Lion King". Since it wasn't going to affect the outcome we did it. Dad arrived in full cultural dress (not sure the name of it and don't want to offend). It ended up being rather moving.
    I probably would've taken offense to this since I'm Kenyan hahahaha. j/k I would've loved to see that.
  11. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Shookclays
    I probably would've taken offense to this since I'm Kenyan hahahaha. j/k I would've loved to see that.
    LOL! Soooo, just out of curiosity what would the correct term be for Kenyan "cultural dress"? I love to learn these little nuggets of information.
  12. by   ruby_jane
    Father wanted to use traditional sword of family lineage going back hundreds of years to cut the umbilical cord.

    I offered to take said sword to the autoclave to sterilize but said I couldn't be sure it would remain intact what with the red stone at the hilt. He decided on an alternate plan. Much about birth plans/expectations are assisting the family in finding their alternate plan. You did a great job advocating for your patients!
  13. by   JKL33
    Quote from Shookclays

    Before security came he started speaking in a deep voice and his eyes started rolling back, that's when we got the mom and baby to safety while he stayed in the room chanting something about Satan and satanism.
    Okay but for this part ^ he did deserve a seasoned and nonplussed nurse possibly with a good "mom voice" to say, "Stop that right this instant" and "you're not scaring anyone." Please.

    (Although honestly I wouldn't bother. I have very little to add to patients'/families' antics these days and certainly wouldn't want to take the chance of escalating things anyway...just call security)
  14. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from Shooklays
    I've always wondered but is it specific to the facility or the state in terms of what to do if a "family decision" will cause harm for the patient.
    I would say not typically... I mean, in this case w/ the pt asking him to leave and he not complying: it is her right to decline visitors or religious rites no matter where she is.

    There are sometimes facility-specific policies. One example where I work: pt sustains GSWs in the course of gang or drug activity. Our policy is those pts may only have two visitors.

    But in cases where visitor is ignoring the pt's request to leave, someone armed, a family member interfering with medical care -- those things are threats anywhere

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