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Nursing shortage is BS

Nurses   (8,362 Views | 70 Replies)

Anthony O is a BSN and specializes in Case Management.

644 Profile Views; 19 Posts

You are reading page 2 of Nursing shortage is BS. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Kyla RN is a BSN and specializes in Research, Neurology.

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I'm guessing you would've already noticed this, but are there no hospitals that offer fellowships? Up here in Oregon, the residencies are for new-grad applicants. And then there are nurse fellowships for experienced RNs applying into an inpatient specialty that they have no experience in. 

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OUxPhys has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiology.

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I agree that this "nurse shortage" is mainly hospital driven. Some refuse to hire ADNs. Others dont want to hire experienced nurses because they will have to pay more. Then you have the majority that cause nurse burnout and nurses leave the profession all together or just the bedside.

Leaving CA would be tough since the have that safe staffing law but you might have to.  

19 hours ago, Kyla RN said:

I'm guessing you would've already noticed this, but are there no hospitals that offer fellowships? Up here in Oregon, the residencies are for new-grad applicants. And then there are nurse fellowships for experienced RNs applying into an inpatient specialty that they have no experience in. 

That is actually a pretty good idea regarding the fellowships. I wish more hospitals had programs like this.

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On 10/24/2019 at 8:03 PM, chare said:

The nursing shortage is withouth doubt a regional phenomenon.  I'm familiar with the area mmc51264 referred to.  In addition to the positions at her or his facility the other two healthcare systems each have over 200 RN positions posted. While a few positions, at all three systems require two years experience and/or unit specific experience all that is required for the majority of nursing positions is one year nursing experience.  

And this isn't unique to the three healthcare systems in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area as most hospitals in NC have multiple nursing positions available.

If you are in a position that you can relocate, there are definitely jobs available.  Best wishes.

Something you aren't mentioning.

The hourly pay is $22-26/hr. 

The average rent is >$1000/mo for a decent 2 br without having to commute an hour each way through the worst traffic you've seen since....L.A.  Raleigh traffic is a nightmare---and if the rent's cheap---you're living in a dangerous place.

Schools are so awful that most move to Wake Forest and pay for private education for their kids.

So---wanna know why the jobs are open? Not because Duke, UNC and Wake are horrible places to work. They are great places.

The pay is substandard for an area that is "very expensive" if you are making that crappy hourly wage.

They collude to keep the wages exactly the same for all levels, so you cannot just "go down the street" and get a better paying job.

Be careful what some here tell you about areas of need---they forget the biggest priority---paying your bills and having some type of work/life balance.

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Just a few comments on living in Raleigh:

  • Yes, traffic  is worse than it was 10 years ago
  • No, traffic  isn't as bad as it is in many other big cities
  • Yes, it is easy to find alternate routes to avoid the traffic
  • Yes, others are slowly discovering these alternate routes
  • Yes, housing is overpriced
  • Yes, nursing salaries are less than what they should be
  • However....it is hard to find an area in the country where you get good pay, good quality of life, reasonable housing costs, and it is relatively easy to get a nursing job

Edited by Epidural

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Ddestiny has 7 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Post-Surg, Oncology, Psych, Family.

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Shortage or not, is all about location.

I just recently moved but before that lived in Kansas. I lived throughout the state at different times and there is a legitimate nursing shortage there. New grads can get into the "hot" specialties (at least ICU and ER....I never really inquired about L/D) right out of school without having to pay dues on night shift. BSNs are not typically required though there are a few magnet hospitals sprinkled here and there.

Now I live in the Toledo, OH area and the market is a bit different here. There is definitely a need for more nurses but one should still expect to spend some time on nights, irrespective of experience. I've been a nurse for 7 years with 2 years ICU and I accepted an ICU position on nights. My first night job! lol The unit I'm working on is really hurting for nurses and there are a ton of new grads. One thing I will say, they definitely support their new nurses a lot better than what I saw in Kansas. A FIVE MONTH new grad orientation! But it's also very rare for them to (get the opportunity to) hire experienced nurses. Since everything in the area is so seniority-based and you'd have to start over anywhere you go, I think people tend to stay in one hospital system more.

Anyway, my point is that location is key, and it can be hard to really understand a place's job economy until you really delve into it. Picking a location to move and then finding a job might be doing things backwards -- the strategy may need to be to find the job you want, and worrying about location second. It sounds like California is very difficult to break into, and there's enough competition that they don't feel the need to take a risk on someone who is changing specialties. The required strategy to get into your preferred specialty might be to move to a cheaper/less desirable area of the country, pay your dues, then return back once you can secure a position in CA. It's a lot of work, admittedly, but it just depends upon your priorities. There are no wrong answers.

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On 10/23/2019 at 7:44 PM, Anthony O said:

I recently lost my job and started applying. Seven years of experience and a bachelor's degree, I thought I'd be a hot commodity. It's 2019 and things are no different than when I graduated shortly after the recession. I apply to jobs and my applications are instantly rejected because I don't have medical/surgical experience. I don't fit the requirements for a new grad program, either.

Well there is this supposed shortage where everyone is understaffed and desperate for nurses. I don't see it. Nobody is willing to train new staff and nobody will hire those of us who got screwed during the recession.

I think it's all BS. I've met a lot of nurses in similar situations and they all struggle trying to get out of this low level line of work.

My last job was at Kaiser where I had a benefits plan worth my annual salary. We were horribly understaffed too. But, I would look at the jobs page for anything available so I could tell my friends where to apply. There were never any jobs there. Management always told us they were going to hire more, but they never did. When the Joint Commission left, they got rid of the travel nurses and stopped hiring. Then, they started instituting mandatory overtime and overloading us past the ratio policy limits.

Honestly, I think hospitals and facilities are just happy the way things are. They know there are nurses who want to get in. I've never been in management before, so I don't know why they make that decision. However, I suspect it costs more to hire a new employee than it would to pay overtime for current staff.

Sorry to hear this. There seems to be a mindset that home health experience is not valuable. Same thing happens here in NYC with LTC unless you work tele/vents/subacute.  Lots of people are being told the wrong things when starting nursing school. 

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Anthony O is a BSN and specializes in Case Management.

19 Posts; 644 Profile Views

8 minutes ago, stockmanjr said:

Sorry to hear this. There seems to be a mindset that home health experience is not valuable. Same thing happens here in NYC with LTC unless you work tele/vents/subacute.  Lots of people are being told the wrong things when starting nursing school. 

I wonder if it only affects those of us in cities. I'm in LA and you're in NYC. Everyone in small towns say their hospitals will hire anyone.

How is it in NY and NJ? I have family in NJ and had considered moving back there. However, that area has a large population. Wondering if they all experience the same. NJ is pretty much the suburbs for NYC. So, I'd probably end up applying for jobs there along with hospitals in NJ.

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7 minutes ago, Anthony O said:

I wonder if it only affects those of us in cities. I'm in LA and you're in NYC. Everyone in small towns say their hospitals will hire anyone.

How is it in NY and NJ? I have family in NJ and had considered moving back there. However, that area has a large population. Wondering if they all experience the same. NJ is pretty much the suburbs for NYC. So, I'd probably end up applying for jobs there along with hospitals in NJ.

In NYC many of the hospitals beyond HHC are putting acute care experience in their inpatient job requirements. You may be able to slide into an outpatient jobs. If you go outside the "Ring" as I like to call it of the NYC Metro you will be many more job openings. That would be West of 287 Somewhere between 287 and 195 tot the South. Also, openings tend to be in Rockland, Orange, and even further up Ulster Counties in NY. Depending where you are in NJ you could also work in NE or SE PA. My problem is that I don't drive so I'm limited to commutable distances or moving to a place like Philly. 

Edited by stockmanjr

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Anthony O is a BSN and specializes in Case Management.

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5 minutes ago, stockmanjr said:

In NYC many of the hospitals beyond HHC are putting acute care experience in their inpatient job requirements. You may be able to slide into an outpatient jobs. If you go outside the "Ring" as I like to call it of the NYC Metro you will be many more job openings. That would be West of 287 Somewhere between 287 and 195 tot the South. Also, openings tend to be in Rockland, Orange, and even further up Ulster Counties in NY. Depending where you are in NJ you could also work in NE or SE PA. My problem is that I don't drive so I'm limited to commutable distances or moving to a place like Philly. 

I haven't lived there in close to 10 years now, but I recall hating the 95 into Philly and 287 about as much as I hate LA traffic. At least you guys have decent public transportation. I would definitely get rid of my car if I moved back.

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I grew up in North Jersey and currently live in South Jersey right outside of Philly. There are a lot of great hospitals here but big competition. You have tons of grads between South Jersey and Philly all competing for the same hospital jobs. With that being said...people in my cohort are getting jobs in hospitals and 1 even got a school nurse job! We all have ASN’s and if they are magnet, they are giving them 2 years to complete their BSN. It’s all about networking and being persistent to get in. I got my ACLS right after graduation to get a leg up. If you don’t have any certifications, it may be a good time to take a class to add to your experience.

Good Luck!

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I read that there was a projected nursing shortage that has been taken care of. I have also talked HR people and they have told me that want nurses that are trained, certified, rather than training and certifying an employee that might leave for something better.  

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