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Nursing Is No Longer Worth It

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AnonymousSuper has 8 years experience and specializes in Supervisor.

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Is Nursing Worth the Risk?

Nurses are treated like expendable pieces of meat that are readily replaced like a disposable dead battery. Covid-19 is the straw that has finally broken the camel's back for me and now I'm ready to leave nursing completely. You only live once in this life. If you happen to discover this article and you're considering a career in nursing, I would urge you to turn around and look elsewhere. You are reading page 8 of Nursing Is No Longer Worth It. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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2 hours ago, InTheLongRun said:

 I can't blame you.   In most cases the more risk you take the higher you're paid.   That's not true in nursing even with your license and health on the risk all the time.   I don't know why but I've discussed it with other nurses and we all suspect it is because it is predominantly a female profession.

Long Run - I've brought this up before elsewhere, and sadly, I am of the school that believes that this is the TRUE reason that nursing is as it is. The ONLY OTHER profession I can similarly equate this to is women religious (nuns).

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9 hours ago, OUxPhys said:

selfless job with very little recognition. 

This is why it isn't worth it.  I'm not a saint.  

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benharold1 has 35 years experience as a BSN.

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Unfortunately, I feel that nursing has changed so much since I began 35 years ago.  In the past I felt that nurses were well treated and respected. However, now everything revolves around money.  Nurse managers play into the hands of greedy administrators and do not respect or help their staff anymore.  I quit my job due to such a manager who completely disrespected me.  She did not like for anyone to question her even if it pertained to patient-safety issues and wrote me up.  ( The first time in 35 years as a nurse)

Nurses truly need Unions to have a voice to represent what is best for the profession and patients!  The current environment of cooperate-run nursing is very unpleasant with nonsense such as AIDET and putting on a happy face to the public that all is okay when it is not.  The pandemic shows just how hospitals should have been focusing on more important things instead of superficially pretending to the public that they will get great care. 

Now we have a situation that nurses are in jeopardy of their health and lives because hospitals and government seem to think they are dispensable.

The profession was touted as a place to have job security but now I question how many citizens in the future will choose to enter the profession if their lives can be in jeopardy.  

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I agree. There needs to something in place that puts uppers on notice to do the right thing.  Nurses can mobilize in some form but when they do even in a pandemic they get fired to be made example of to scare the rest. 

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I agree with the female dominated workforce being a huge part of the reason that nurses, teachers, etc. don't have an equitable pay/benefit/severance history. Women generally don't advocate for themselves like males do. We are different and play by the male rule. We expect people to notice and appreciate the sacrifices we are making , trying to not come off as greedy. We are told to be a part of a team with very little imput that is even considered. Pizza parties and travel mugs are the bonus and reusing PPE if available are the cost containment measures.

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Isn’t this a subjectable question really? Any job/ career is worth it, if you feel value in it. Just as it is worthless is you don’t! A liberal arts degree is worthless in many regards but for those utilizing it and are happy with the end result than it is very valuable. I know a lady that couldn’t get landed in a residency for her MD degree and works at Starbucks. She is one of the most chipper people I’ve ever met serving coffee to people. She didn’t seem to let not being a doctor get her down as she found joy making people happy in a company that treats employees very well she said. I have no idea still how she is paying her student loans off at Starbucks. I’d personally be depressed but that’s just me. Life is all about perspective, some people find the bright side and others the negative. 

Edited by Chunkybubblz3

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Orca has 25 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Corrections, psychiatry, rehab, LTC.

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I have been in this profession for over 25 years. It was a mid-life career change, much more rewarding than the miserable dead-end desk job that I had prior to this. That said, I hear, and have experienced, much of what the OP talks about. It is one big reason that I got out of hospital nursing years ago, and I have no intention of ever going back.

The first hospital that I worked for fresh out of school was owned by the community where I lived. It was sold to a corporation, because the city decided that they could no longer afford the investment that it would take to keep the hospital competitive from a technology and equipment standpoint. The new company immediately dismissed everyone in management except for the head of human resources, and all of us had to reapply for the jobs that we already had. Some were not rehired.

After relocating, I worked for a stand-alone mental health facility that was part of a large national chain. After flying someone in from corporate to lie to us and tell us that we weren't closing, two weeks later I discharged the last patient from the facility and I was unemployed. I found out near the end that we could have remained open because we were for sale and we had a buyer, but corporate killed the deal by insisting that the buyer assume liability for any pending lawsuits as part of the sale.

I worked for a branch of a major rehabilitation hospital chain. The CEO apparently did everything but walk on water because his photo, and quotes from him, were plastered all over the building - until he was convicted in federal court of multiple counts of fraud, then they magically disappeared.

The last hospital that I worked in, geriatric psychiatry unit. I worked night shift going into the day when the facility changed ownership, so I was on duty when the change occurred. They had an employee whose sole duty it was to find every employee on duty, and to stick a small strip of paper onto our ID cards that covered up the name of the old owner and bore the name of the new. Great set of priorities.

Over the years, I have found that hospital managers love to throw around the phrase "quality care" when making a sales pitch to the public, while behind the scenes they do everything that they can to make it impossible for us to deliver it. They understaff, underpay and undertrain. When you gain experience, rather than seeing the value in that and locking you up long term, they dump you because you are costing them too much money. You are then replaced by someone with far less experience who will work for less money. As the OP says, when something goes wrong, blame the nurse. To them, we are disposable and interchangeable, and we don't generate revenue. Physicians, on the other hand, can make mistakes all over the place, but they bring in cash. Got to protect them.

I don't regret going into the profession, because it has given me a good living, and my current job is secure. I am glad that I left hospital nursing, however. I still can, and frequently do, get sued (when you work around inmates it's an occupational hazard), but the Attorney General represents me.

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15 Posts; 926 Profile Views

The OP and similar posts really nailed it! 

When I started in nursing over twenty years ago, I never thought there would be backstabbing, sabotage, under training and all of the other bad nursing behavior described here in this thread. I never thought administrators would put money over quality patient care. Silly, silly me - I had no idea! Not a clue!

A recent job made it no secret that they were 150% interested in saving money vs. safe patient care and relied heavily on skilled nursing or home health to fill in the gaps where they were unwilling to pay hospital rates. The most disgusting thing about it was being blamed because your patient was in the hospital too long and somehow this was solely your fault. The lies you tell in order to get patients to agree to the discharge plan. This experience made me take a step back to evaluate why I became a nurse at all. Has it come to this? Lying to patients to save money for a billion dollar corporation? 

My answer to that is....I still love nursing. I still love making that connection to patients and families in their most trying times. I still love educating patients on their health conditions and seeing them make changes for the better. 

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15 Posts; 926 Profile Views

Just want to clarify that I don’t work for that greedy corporation anymore! 

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speedynurse is a RN, EMT-P and specializes in ER.

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On 5/1/2020 at 11:11 PM, InTheLongRun said:

Not to be unsympathetic but here's the thing.  You just described the experience of many, many , many people across any number of industries.

The nation for 40 years has been dismantling labor rights, workplace protection and the social safety net. All  things many a person outright died for < 100 years ago.    What you're witnessing is just the net result and it's not a whole lot better in many industries.

I think the difference is that we deal with human lives.....life and death.....sentinel events that could be prevented.....etc. From someone who has grown up in a family of engineers and teachers - nursing is not on the same wavelength.

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Steristripqueen has 26 years experience.

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Your writing is spot on.  However, in any job,  management may see employees as expendable.   Nurses need to take their own path of contentment.  There are so many fields of nursing that should be looked into.   My path was to leave med/surg hospital nursing and spend 22 yrs in Correctional nursing.  All male medium/maximum security.  I wouldn’t change a thing!  I learned so much and experienced many situations that I would never experienced in the hospital setting.  

The thing to remember is that ‘we’ know how valuable nurses are and will be needed for our communities,our families, and for ourselves.  If we don’t stay in the field and support/encourage our peers there will be no one to care for us in our time of need.  

I THANK EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU!

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Section8UpX68WM6 has 27 years experience as a CNA, LVN, EMT-B.

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On 4/19/2020 at 5:36 AM, HiddenAngels said:

uuuuuh HELLO! Amen to this!

😂🤣 I've got a tote bag that has my former company logo all over it. 

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