How do you feel about ADN nurses? - page 10

My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you... Read More

  1. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from The Veridican
    ...I don't think a BSN is necessary, but I do feel a nurse should have a bachelors degree in some field so they are educated enough to converse intelligently with the other members of the healthcare team (doctors, administrators, PTs, OTs, RTs, other nurses, etc.)

    I respect your opinion, but also want to comment on it. I am going for my ADN, and plan on doing the RN-BSN or RN-MSN within the first year, or at least right after the first year so I feel more comfortable with the job.

    I just have a problem with the thought of having a bachelors degree makes someone educated enough to converse intelligently with other members of the healthcare team. I really common sense, with a backing of higher education makes one more intelligent. You can have a PhD, and have the scruples of a rat. Book smarts doesn't always make you smart. Common sense goes a long way.

    Over all.....I do agree that all RNs should be required to advance their education to at least the BSN level, funded by the hospitals. This allows more RNs to be employed, but gains respect as they are required to have CEU's that get them the next degree. (I hope I explained that right....so much for the common sense last hope.)
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    NO ONE can say that one degree get more clinical experience than the other and have that be the truth. EACH institution varies on that, one may do more or less than the other, etc.

    (Some of the remarks on this thread are great examples for the"Why is There a Nursing Shortage" thread, though.)
  3. by   lil_judt
    Quote from Summitk2
    I agree about the rude comments, Kenni... even the comments that aren't rude are very divisive (e.g. "we are the champions" [adns]). However, it's hard to unify such a huge population of people from different backgrounds. There's good, healthy dialogue amidst all the rude comments if you have the patience to dig through it.

    Like you, I'm also earning my 2nd bachelors degree. Personally, it made sense to get a 4 yr. degree in the same 2 yrs. that it would take to get an ADN. I also have my sights set on graduate course work, advanced practice nursing, and perhaps educating. If you're the kind of person who would like to further your career down the road (even if you don't have specific plans now), the BSN is the way to go. If you have a prior bachelors degree, I think it's a no-brainer.
    Hi .. I would love to pursue my degree more like to a BSN. I live in an area where you would need to travel an hour each day.
    At this time, I am 55. Received my LPN at 32. Received my ADN at age 42. I took an online class while I worked fulltime...I was a mess..................
    After not being able to continue (no one paid my tuitionand online is COSTLY)
    Now being unemployed... I am trying to just make my ends meet.
    Continuing a degree at this stage (unless you have supplemented income) is not a choice.
    Take care and good luck. :hatparty:
  4. by   das
    Quote from Fun2Care
    I respect your opinion, but also want to comment on it. I am going for my ADN, and plan on doing the RN-BSN or RN-MSN within the first year, or at least right after the first year so I feel more comfortable with the job.

    I just have a problem with the thought of having a bachelors degree makes someone educated enough to converse intelligently with other members of the healthcare team. I really common sense, with a backing of higher education makes one more intelligent. You can have a PhD, and have the scruples of a rat. Book smarts doesn't always make you smart. Common sense goes a long way.

    Over all.....I do agree that all RNs should be required to advance their education to at least the BSN level, funded by the hospitals. This allows more RNs to be employed, but gains respect as they are required to have CEU's that get them the next degree. (I hope I explained that right....so much for the common sense last hope.)

    I have to disagree with the statement that all RN's should be required to advance their education to at least the BSN level. It is a personel choice and I don't care who funds it. I have been active at local and state levels of our professional nursing organization and this push to require BSN is something that is always being debated. A BSN does not make you a better or more rounded nurse. THe same goes for ADN's, they are not all better than BSN's. It is the INDIVIDUAL and there ABILITIES to put it all together and use common sense. More clinical experience is a definite plus. Maybe nurses need to evaulate where they start instead of every new grad wanting to hit EDs, ICUs, CCUs... right off the bat. Maybe medical is a better place to start and get experience.

    Just in case you are wondering I am an ADN but I also have a BS and MS in Speech Path. I also started as an LPN then went on to my ADN and have no desire to go further in my education. I am happy as a clinical RN with 20years experience and the only reason I would go for a BSN is if I had a desire to go onto a management position.
  5. by   MobetterRN2
    Quote from The Veridican
    R.N. is the only profession I know of that allows you to be considered one of the "learned professions" with only having completed an associate degree, and more often in the past, a diploma program.

    People make a lot out of the BSN, but if it were the minimum entrance degree for nursing, we wouldn't have 1/2 the nurses we have. I don't think a BSN is necessary, but I do feel a nurse should have a bachelors degree in some field so they are educated enough to converse intelligently with the other members of the healthcare team (doctors, administrators, PTs, OTs, RTs, other nurses, etc.).

    I am one of the rare individuals that believes a bachelors should be required before admission to nursing school, and nursing school should award a masters degree. The only problem is that no one would want to work at the bedside then.

    Where I work, you don't know which nurses are ADNs or BSNs because it's not on our name badges. But in reality, as soon as you talk to someone on the floor, you can tell whether they've had two years or four years of education.

    Just my two cents.

    Veridican

    There are people who do not have even one year of college that know how to converse with others. I know several. ( Housekeepers, Diet aides,
    volunteers at the hosptial, laundry workers, etc.) I know it is your opinion,
    but I think you better be careful. You may insult someone at your place of work.
    Can you tell I have an ADN or BSN by the way I am writing this reply?
  6. by   lil_judt
    Quote from das
    I have to disagree with the statement that all RN's should be required to advance their education to at least the BSN level. It is a personel choice and I don't care who funds it. I have been active at local and state levels of our professional nursing organization and this push to require BSN is something that is always being debated. A BSN does not make you a better or more rounded nurse. THe same goes for ADN's, they are not all better than BSN's. It is the INDIVIDUAL and there ABILITIES to put it all together and use common sense. More clinical experience is a definite plus. Maybe nurses need to evaulate where they start instead of every new grad wanting to hit EDs, ICUs, CCUs... right off the bat. Maybe medical is a better place to start and get experience.

    Just in case you are wondering I am an ADN but I also have a BS and MS in Speech Path. I also started as an LPN then went on to my ADN and have no desire to go further in my education. I am happy as a clinical RN with 20years experience and the only reason I would go for a BSN is if I had a desire to go onto a management position.
    The system still continues to have that 4 year... and that is where us older nurses :stone continue to have the problems.
    In my case I live in a rural UP of Michigan...very few colleges.
    Marquette General was giving a class on critical nursing ...I jumped at the chance but...was told it was for ONLY New Grads.
    I was quite put out.
    I have 3 kids ..2 of which I encouraged them to finish for the 4 year degree (one is speech path..and the other in civil engineering, My 3rd just started college )....
    In summary, the system wants a 4 year...and that is too bad ..cause as you alll know... we all have talents....instead of the nursing industry picking those oldies up and make nursing better and resouceful to all.
    I have been in all aspects of nursing...even corrections.....and it was all a great experience.
    Soon I will leave nursing cause no one wants a oldie like me with the ADN.
  7. by   spike13
    Quote from elizzy
    I have to agree with you, I'm a little offended as well.
    Elizabeth RN, ASN, CCRN
    I couldn't agree with you more. I'm graduating with my ASN in December and most of the RN's at the hospital I work at are ASN's.
    In my hospital, which happens to be the busiest trauma center in MN, the majority of RN's that actually work with pt's are ASN's, and the BSN's primarily work in administrative positions or occupational health.
    Most never even work with pt's.
    Monica LPN, RN INTERN
  8. by   MobetterRN2
    Quote from spike13
    I couldn't agree with you more. I'm graduating with my ASN in December and most of the RN's at the hospital I work at are ASN's.
    In my hospital, which happens to be the busiest trauma center in MN, the majority of RN's that actually work with pt's are ASN's, and the BSN's primarily work in administrative positions or occupational health.
    Most never even work with pt's.
    Monica LPN, RN INTERN

    I am an Associate Degree Nurse and and a darn good one. I attempted to pursue my BSN but I found it VERY expensive and time consuming and that my BSN counterparts were coming out making in my State (Illinois) only $.50 more than the new grad ADN. I make more than the new grad BSNs due to experience and we do the same work on the floor (Medical surgical-ICU). Patients are more concerned about you giving their insulin injection correctly and to give them the correct blood pressure medication. The education part is a given to them or you would not be working as an RN. True most higher education nurses are doing administrative work, but if everybody decided to do this, who will take care of the bedside part? I am for people more than paperwork.
  9. by   LolaJay
    Quote from Stacy W
    My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you all think.
    Stacey,
    I wanted to reply to your ADN vs BSN dilemma. With 13 years of experience and a BSN under my belt, I believe a BSN is important if you plan on moving into a management position. Generally a BSN is required, but also clinical experience is also required with a good solid foundation in the fundamentals of whatever area you would manage. Most BSN nurses do not graduate take boards and move into these "GOLDEN OPPORTUNITIES" they also will start out as a staff nurse, and more so then not, start out making the same exact pay as any ADN nurse. There are a few places that may pay $1.00 more for a BSN, alot do not. With the extreme nursing shortage today, hospitals and any healthcare facility need nurses. I would encourage you to graduate take your boards and seek out a position of interest. Once you get comfortable with your skills, and this whole BSN dilemma comes up, if are desirous to go back for your BSN, most hospitals offer 2500.00 per year of tuition reimbursement. Your boards are behind you and you have experience under your belt and 2500.00 per year that you do not have to worry about paying.
    When I first graduated BSN prepared nurses were the "TRUE PROFESSIONAL" having a BSN degree. When I was orienting on my first job, all of the other "Seasoned" Rn's, mostly from hospital based or ADN nurses took an attitude against us, we would hear them say, "Well lets wait til one of their patients codes, what are they going to do, get a book out" Back then, they called BSN nurses, BOOK SMART and severely lacking with clinical skills. This was in fact true.
    Hospital nursing programs put out the best nurses prepared clinically, since they do many more clinical hours, even more than ADN nurses. I work in the #1 heart center in the country and most of the RN's are ADN prepared perhaps that went back for a BSN, and hands down are clinically top notch, or the "A" team. Their clinical skills run circles around MSN nurses, and conventional BSN nurses. The clinical skills in my unit are beyond the level of respect. While many of the nurses still remain ADN prepared, their clinical skills are far above any "ready to graduate" BSN prepared nurse, even after 5 years experience under her belt.
    A BSN is a great thing, however an ADN nurse clinically stands "toe to toe" anyday. Experience and clinical skills to me speaks louder anyday than a title after your signature. I would much rather have an experienced ADN nurse working with me with excellent clinical skills than having a BSN nurse lacking in clinical skills and experience.
    In our unit, there is wide variety of nurses,BSN, ADN, LPN to RN, and when that pinnacle moment comes, where knowing what to do and possessing the clinical skills is very important, every second counting, noone says after it is all over, "Well maybe if it were Susie with the BSN" the outcome would have been different.
    I was recently at an ACLS recertification last month, there were many new faces, and taking a closer look, many of the nurses were MSN, (masters prepared RN's) There was a brief overview of simple manuevers such of the Heimlech, I was "embarrassed" to hear two of the MSN nurses ask the instructor: "what is the heimlech" again? These are Masters prepared nurses that didnt even know this?
    I just wanted to share my experience with you since you are brand new and help you to see, there is good and bad everywhere, there are different situations life shows us. An ADN prepared nurse is just as important in a clinical setting as a BSN nurse. I feel in the clinical setting I work, and my 13 years experience as a nurse, clinical skills, experience and a good knowledge of the protocols is far more valuable than a title.
    I wish you all the best in your nursing endeavors.
  10. by   SaderNurse05
    Quote from mgallant
    :hatparty: :yeahthat: couldnt have said that better myself...adn after 18 years as an lpn, now in school for my bachelors because i want to, not because it will make me a better nurse...bsn is mostly theory and extraneous bs!
    you are correct! i am about 6 weeks away from graduating with my bsn and i have finally figured out what the bs really stands for... :chuckle
  11. by   rsqme
    Quote from The Veridican
    R.N. is the only profession I know of that allows you to be considered one of the "learned professions" with only having completed an associate degree, and more often in the past, a diploma program.

    People make a lot out of the BSN, but if it were the minimum entrance degree for nursing, we wouldn't have 1/2 the nurses we have. I don't think a BSN is necessary, but I do feel a nurse should have a bachelors degree in some field so they are educated enough to converse intelligently with the other members of the healthcare team (doctors, administrators, PTs, OTs, RTs, other nurses, etc.).

    I am one of the rare individuals that believes a bachelors should be required before admission to nursing school, and nursing school should award a masters degree. The only problem is that no one would want to work at the bedside then.

    Where I work, you don't know which nurses are ADNs or BSNs because it's not on our name badges. But in reality, as soon as you talk to someone on the floor, you can tell whether they've had two years or four years of education.

    Just my two cents.

    Veridican
    Please! How arrogant you sound. I do not believe that you can tell how many years of nursing school a nurse has had by talking to them. Inflation is great, and your two cents isn't worth much. Dedicated, caring, intelligent, nurses are abundant in the nursing population. It may be the LVN, LPN, ADN, BSN, or MSN. Most of us chose nursing because we care about people and wanted to make a difference. I have talked to doctors that didn't sound as intelligent as some of the people I work on the floor with, from the diet department to administration. I have also talked to some doctors that are very intelligent, and compassionate.
    Try not to be so judgmental. We are all there for one purpose.
  12. by   Sonny276
    Quote from Stacy W
    My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you all think.
    Hi Stacy,
    Ive tasted both side of the coin, ADN and BSN. My ADN at least in my area gave me the ability to hit the floor and function as a nurse with little assistance. The BSN was more theory and less practical again in my area of the country. Many people here go the ADN to BSN route.
    Hold your head high your as good as anybody, you just lack experiance.
    In my state (Georgia) ADNs take the same state required test as the BSNs. The local ADN schools Always have a higher number of nurses passing than does the BSN program.

    As far as going on. If you want to be in the administrtive area of nursing you need to get the BSN. Or, you could go back to school and get a BS in another area such as law or business.

    Bset of Luck!
    Sonny276
  13. by   SOCALRACERX911_RN
    I do feel a nurse should have a bachelors degree in some field so they are educated enough to converse intelligently with the other members of the healthcare team (doctors, administrators, PTs, OTs, RTs, other nurses, etc.).

    A response to the above statment. So what you are trying to say is that the thousands of nurses with less than a bachelors degree can not carry an intelligent conversation because they only have an associates degree, I beg to differ.

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