Quitting Small Residency for Bigger, Better Residency

  1. Dear Nurse Beth,

    I just started as a nurse resident at a small community hospital. The managers, educators, and staff have all seemed very supportive and helpful so far and my new colleagues are just as supportive. However, I just received notice that I got accepted into a "big name" nurse residency program that begins in a couple months and am very inclined to take this offer.

    1) If I were to quit my current nurse residency, how would I go about talking to my manager/preceptor about it? Ideally I'd like to continue to stay in my current position, up until right before the start date of the other program.

    2) What comparisons should I be making when deciding between my current position and this seemingly greater opportunity I just received?


    Dear Quitting,

    Quitting one residency for another residency is frowned upon. The facility has invested resources into you, and the spot you are about to vacate could have been filled by another.

    Also residencies typically stipulate no acute care experience. Are you planning to disclose to the "big name" residency that you are currently in a residency?

    Nursing is a small world and it's best not to burn bridges.


    Best wishes,

    Nurse Beth

    Author, "Your Last Nursing Class: How to Land Your First Nursing Job"...and your next!
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    About Nurse Beth, MSN, RN

    Joined: Mar '07; Posts: 1,415; Likes: 4,225

    25 Comments

  3. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Nurse Beth
    Ideally I'd like to continue to stay in my current position, up until right before the start date of the other program.
    You have GOT to be kidding me!!!Is this a joke?
  4. by   cee_ja18
    My question off the original post is what if you were given a verbal offer to residency A, accepted the position and signed a contract. But then, you were offered a position in residency B (preffered residency) before residency A began the program.

    I do understand that it is very important not to burn any bridges in the nursing realm, but wanted to know if it changes anything if you were offered the preffered residency before you began any new grad program.
  5. by   beekee
    Because it does not appear you realize this, if you tell your manager that you are leaving for a bigger, better residency, your employment will end then. If you tell your manager you are quitting during the residency, your employment will end then. And, if you leave during the residency, you will likely be placed on the do not hire list. Maybe it's a small community hospital with no clinics or other affiliated hospitals, so you think no big deal. However, mergers and acquisitions are rampant.
  6. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from cee_ja18
    My question off the original post is what if you were given a verbal offer to residency A, accepted the position and signed a contract. But then, you were offered a position in residency B (preffered residency) before residency A began the program.
    Still not a great idea as the nursing world is very, very small but not nearly as bad as jumping ship AFTER you start a residency. Or expecting the first residency to keep spending money on training you until your new residency starts. My mind is still blown about that.
  7. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from Wuzzie
    You have GOT to be kidding me!!!Is this a joke?
    Sadly, it probably isn't a joke. Professionalism is dying a slow, painful death. I no longer take anyone at their word.
  8. by   AxelNewRN86
    Stay at your current residency and politely decline your preferred residency. Do your time where your at and learn everything you can. Then apply for fellowships at your preferred hospital after 1-2 years depending on if you signed a contract. Don't burn bridges. I understand where you are coming from because I was in a similar situation.
  9. by   amzyRN
    That's a pretty slimy thing to do if they are supportive and you like your work environment. My first nursing job gave me awesome training with a work environment that was second to none and I stayed the entire contracted time that I agreed to. I kept my word to them because they were good to me and helped build me up into the nurse I am today.

    I have left jobs sooner than intended but not for a better opportunity when the present one was good, but because the work environment was unsafe or toxic in some way or the work load was too heavy with lack of regard for my safety.

    I don't understand why someone would leave a job that was providing support and a positive work environment. If you do that I think you are inviting some negative reprecussions.
  10. by   amzyRN
    removed-double post
  11. by   RNNPICU
    So you currently have a very supportive environment that is nuturing you and helping you grow as a nurse. Is this big name hospital ging to have this great environment? Maybe not,, maybe yes. What is wrong with your current place? It sounds like a great place to work and it sounds like you are happy. Just because something has a big name does not always mean that the day to day work is any different. Not always is bigger better.

    In a few months you could be off orientation. How far into orientation are you?
    I think it would be rather dishonest to accept the new residency. You absolutely would not be able to work up until your other residency started, that would be unprofessional You run the risk of being blacklisted and placed on a don-not-rehire list. This could impact you throughout the hospital system.
  12. by   CoolKidsRN
    You can mostly likely be assured a spot on the "do not rehire" list if you jump ship...
  13. by   RNperdiem
    Why do you believe the "big name" hospital will be a better choice? How does it compare to the supportive, helpful environment you are currently working in?
    Supportive and helpful are never to be taken for granted.
  14. by   caliotter3
    Why throw away a good work environment and insure you can never return, via a "Do not rehire" designation? Years (or weeks) down the road, you may find yourself very, very sorry that you poisoned that well.

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