Length of your monitoring program? - page 2

Just out of curiosity, what is the length of your monitoring program, and which state's program are you in? I am in CT's HAVEN, and it is 5 years! I have another 3.5 years. Seems like it will... Read More

  1. by   LilRedRN1973
    Our state is 5 years. I am in Nevada and we seem to have a fairly strict monitoring program. It requires rehab, then 90 hours of counseling and 90 hours of intensive outpatient. After that, we are required to attend an Aftercare group once a week for a year and a nurse support group once a week for the entire length of the program. Random drug testing for which we must call in 365 days a year, $50/test and no less than 12 times per year of testing. 90 meetings in 90 days then 5 times a week for a year and after that, twice a week for the remainder of the contract. We are required to pay the board $25/month for monitoring, nurse support group runs about $100/month as does Aftercare. We are not permitted to ever work nights while on contract, home health, ER, critical care. No narcotics for the first year. If you are not working as an RN, you do not get time off your contract. This means if you sign your agreement and cannot find a job for a year, you still have 5 years to work off your contract. We are also required to submit monthly reports for the first year (then quarterly), sponsor reports monthly for the first year (then quarterly) and supervisor reports for the first 3 months of a new job (then quarterly).

    If you successfully complete the monitoring contract, all record of it is gone. It does not go reported into the National data bank and it's not in your state's website. Should you violate your agreement, you then get moved to a probationary contract. Same stipulations but it will always be on your record. Some get probation right away (I was told had I not turned myself in, I would have gotten the probationary contract instead of the monitoring contract).
  2. by   sissiesmama
    Quote from LilRedRN1973
    Our state is 5 years. I am in Nevada and we seem to have a fairly strict monitoring program. It requires rehab, then 90 hours of counseling and 90 hours of intensive outpatient. After that, we are required to attend an Aftercare group once a week for a year and a nurse support group once a week for the entire length of the program. Random drug testing for which we must call in 365 days a year, $50/test and no less than 12 times per year of testing. 90 meetings in 90 days then 5 times a week for a year and after that, twice a week for the remainder of the contract. We are required to pay the board $25/month for monitoring, nurse support group runs about $100/month as does Aftercare. We are not permitted to ever work nights while on contract, home health, ER, critical care. No narcotics for the first year. If you are not working as an RN, you do not get time off your contract. This means if you sign your agreement and cannot find a job for a year, you still have 5 years to work off your contract. We are also required to submit monthly reports for the first year (then quarterly), sponsor reports monthly for the first year (then quarterly) and supervisor reports for the first 3 months of a new job (then quarterly).

    If you successfully complete the monitoring contract, all record of it is gone. It does not go reported into the National data bank and it's not in your state's website. Should you violate your agreement, you then get moved to a probationary contract. Same stipulations but it will always be on your record. Some get probation right away (I was told had I not turned myself in, I would have gotten the probationary contract instead of the monitoring contract).
    Does sound a little strict!

    Anne
  3. by   CattyWampus
    Three year "voluntary recovery program" in PA. I just received my official contract (having started the process in August). My favorite phrase in the document is the "I waive my constitutional rights..."

    I'm not sure the difference between a monitoring contract versus a probationary contract. I just know I'm involved for the next 3 years with restrictions on practice, drug & alcohol screening, did the 90/90 meetings, required now to do 3-4 a week but never less than 2 eventually, etc. (First offense, self-reported)
  4. by   Twoyearnurse
    Probationary typically means it leaves a permanent mark on your record. I have to say that does sound strict!

    my state allows for me to complete my contract to five years provided I don't commit any violations, I get to keep the job I have now (which pays the bills) and I intend on completing community hours rather than return to nursing full time. This path is clearly lit for me and I do not intend on fighting against it, I've already done enough of that!
  5. by   CattyWampus
    Thanks for the clarification! Then I'm in monitoring....if I follow all the rules, I will not have any permanent record on my license of this event. I keep telling myself "just do it, don't be bitter, just get it done..." but I keep feeling like I get hit with something new every few weeks. Getting the official contract in the mail yesterday with the specifics of the drug dependence spelled out and knowing I have to give that to an employer (or prospective employer!) just threw me back into the despair I keep crawling out of. I have no intention of fighting; I just have to get through it and do what it says. I know it can be done so I just HAVE TO DO IT. And have faith that it is all for the best.
  6. by   LilRedRN1973
    If it gives any hope, I am one of those in a fairly strict state as far as contracts go. I signed my contract in July 2008 and by the first of the year in 2009, I had fulfilled all my requirements and was able to petition for a restricted license back. I already a job as a dialysis tech and they were aware of my being on contract since when I applied, they wanted to know why someone with a degree in nursing was applying for a tech position. I was honest and showed them my contract. They agreed to hold an RN position until I got my license back, which I did in March and was switched that day from tech to RN in the dialysis clinic. I stayed there until July 2009 and realized I did not like dialysis at all but being on contract, our options are fairly limited. I decided to apply with the state as a psych nurse (hubby had been with the state for about 10 years and it had been good to us). My boss at the time queried as to why I went from ICU to diaysis - he said that was quite a leap. What I didn't know then but I do know now is he was in recovery and at one time, had been on contract himself with the state years prior. I came clean and said that I didn't want to waste anybody's time. Explained I had about a year of sobriety and why I was on contract. I then told him I would understand if he didn't want to hire me. He said "I will see next Tuesday for the interview". I was offered the job on my 1 year sobriety birthday and stayed there 5 years, fulfilling my contract. About 5 months ago, I applied for a position as a nursing supervisor at our local prison. When in the interview, they ask if I had ever been disciplined by the board of nursing. I could have told them "no" as I had fulfilled my contract and the slate was wiped clean. I did not do that - it didn't feel right. I told them I had just finished my 5 year contract with the board. They hired me, knowing my history.

    I realize my situation is unique in many ways and I was given opportunities that maybe haven't been afforded to others but I also have belief that nothing happens in God's world by mistake. I have always been upfront and completely honest about my addiction to prospective employers. The first time felt very uncomfortable and almost shameful, the second time not so much. And by the third, I figured if they didn't want to hire someone with my "background", then I didn't belong there.
  7. by   subee
    Quote from LilRedRN1973
    Our state is 5 years. I am in Nevada and we seem to have a fairly strict monitoring program. It requires rehab, then 90 hours of counseling and 90 hours of intensive outpatient. After that, we are required to attend an Aftercare group once a week for a year and a nurse support group once a week for the entire length of the program. Random drug testing for which we must call in 365 days a year, $50/test and no less than 12 times per year of testing. 90 meetings in 90 days then 5 times a week for a year and after that, twice a week for the remainder of the contract. We are required to pay the board $25/month for monitoring, nurse support group runs about $100/month as does Aftercare. We are not permitted to ever work nights while on contract, home health, ER, critical care. No narcotics for the first year. If you are not working as an RN, you do not get time off your contract. This means if you sign your agreement and cannot find a job for a year, you still have 5 years to work off your contract. We are also required to submit monthly reports for the first year (then quarterly), sponsor reports monthly for the first year (then quarterly) and supervisor reports for the first 3 months of a new job (then quarterly).

    If you successfully complete the monitoring contract, all record of it is gone. It does not go reported into the National data bank and it's not in your state's website. Should you violate your agreement, you then get moved to a probationary contract. Same stipulations but it will always be on your record. Some get probation right away (I was told had I not turned myself in, I would have gotten the probationary contract instead of the monitoring contract).
    In the beginning, this may sound like a very strict program, but longer monitoring increases chance
    returning to work without relapsing. Decades ago, a program manager told me at a conference, that she believed that it takes five years to heal for people who suffered sexual abuse,and that just struck me as so wise at the time. After three decades of working with addicted nurses, five years of monitoring covers most people during the period of increased risk for relapse. Having no mark against your license is also another hallmark of a good program. I've just moved from a state with the same policy to a state that never removes the program participation from your history- very punitive for absolutely no reason...none. I feel a tiny devolved just to move here!
  8. by   dekyrn
    I entered into an alternative monitoring program in Delaware. If completed successfully it would have left no mark on my license. It required random screenings and participation in an after care program for a period of 2 years. While in the program i picked up a new charge and was booted from the program and my license suspended indefinitely (until i petitioned the board to get it back). I walked away completely for over a year. I "grew up" and got my life together and then pettitoned the board for my license back. Because of my history and no proof that i had been clean for the prior year+ my license was given a continued 5 year suspension that would be lifted after a year and switched to probation for the next 4 if i was successfull in my first year. I was required to enroll in the DHPMP/RBH Monitoring, i was required to be evaluated by a mental health/substance abuse/domestic violence proffessional and complete all reccommended treatment. That 5 years still feels like a lifetime for me. Not because i dont think i can do it but because financially its creating an unbelievable hardship on my family (not working as an RN). I'm just over 1 year into my program and have already layed out several thousand dollars in drug testing and treatment (tests are $60-100/each 1-4x/month).
  9. by   dagobah
    CA. Mine is 2 to 4 years. I successfully finished 4 years, 3 months. Diversion. Clean license.
  10. by   dagobah
    This almost sounds the same as CA Diversion. Anyone in CA agree? If it is different, it's not by much.
  11. by   SororAKS
    Indiana's varies, case by case. I have seen 1-5 years.

close