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Nurses with Attitude

Nurses Article   (3,138 Views 30 Comments 870 Words)
by jeastridge jeastridge (Member) Writer Expert Nurse

86 Likes; 5 Followers; 86 Articles; 145,786 Visitors; 378 Posts

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Having a good attitude is key. In this article, the author explores two different approaches to nursing and encourages us to continue to be our very best. You are reading page 2 of Nurses with Attitude. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

86 Likes; 5 Followers; 86 Articles; 145,786 Visitors; 378 Posts

2 hours ago, mrf0609 said:

In listening to nurses interact with their patients, it is so true that the nurse has basically complete control in setting the environment for the patient experience.  I think that this article is well written and really wish that many nurses would read it, unfortunately, those with poor attitudes often have little desire to better themselves or their mindset and will never see something like this.  I appreciate it and even if my world is crashing around me, it is never ok for the patient to feel my pain or stress, this is why I can be sucked dry at the end of the day, having a calm and pleasant demeanor really takes it out of you.. at times they may feel my stress, as I can't keep it all inside all of the time, but I would never let them know exactly why...

I appreciate your response. Nursing is a tough job, for sure. Thank you for working hard to be a great nurse!

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NurseSpeedy has 18 years experience as a ADN, LPN, RN and works as a Nurse.

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6 hours ago, Sour Lemon said:

I am a combo. I would never vent to a patient about horrible staffing or encourage them to complain, but I do try to set realistic expectations.

The "B" scenario reminds me of a requirement for my 1:8 ratio (with an extra 8 assigned to "cover") acute care othro job. We were instructed to sit next to the patient at eye level and have a "caring moment". We were supposed to encourage them to talk about anything and ask for anything while assuring them that we "had time" to listen and provide.
I never did it. Not even once. It would have been more realistic to tell them that I could fly or that I was the queen of England.

I remember this script very well. Thinking back, it may have been the beginning of ‘scripting’ for the customer service aspect of nursing. That line was so insane and fake sounding. I remember cringing when we had the training session on it and were watching the VHS videos teaching us ‘the steps’ for the patient experience. Unit managers would tour the unit through out the day and listen outside the doors to see if we were complying with ‘the script’. Patients didn’t like it any more than we did. One actually laughed out loud when, “I have the time” was added. He called me out on it, laughing hysterically, “Oh, no you don’t! I see you running around out there!”. Luckily he was able to care for himself. Sadly, management just happily checked the box that I was following ‘the script’ and didn’t pay any attention to the fact that it wasn’t sitting well with the patients. 

I agree with others, most of us are a happy medium. I will never mention staffing issues or complain to a patient. It’s unprofessional and it doesn’t help the patient. I’m also going to be honest and state that not every moment is a “Johnson and johnson’s ‘Nurse’ commercial’ either.  We do our best to give the best care possible, but in the end there are only so many hours in a shift and care has to be prioritized and we work with what we are given when it comes to staffing ratios. The patient on their death bed I will bend over backwards to help make comfortable and assist the family in any way possible. The walkie talkie finishing up their several week long course of IV antibiotics after a self inflicted wound infection who is screaming for more apple juice and demanding that ‘someone’ take them downstairs for a cigarette because the doctor told them he would ‘check into it’ may not get those same accommodations, especially since smoking isn’t even allowed on hospital grounds. I will bring him his ‘apple juice’, but it’s going to be after giving a pain med to the patient dying of cancer, not before them just because they’re being overly vocal about it.

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NurseCard has 13 years experience as a ADN and works as a RN.

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I am proud to say that I am ALWAYS a "Nurse B".  Mary Sunshine, that's me. 🤣

Just kidding.  

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and works as a Behavioral Health RN.

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9 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

Couldn’t we find a happy medium between complete a-hole and company suck-up? 😉

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and works as a Behavioral Health RN.

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10 hours ago, Daisy4RN said:

 the line "I have time"

You're referring to the "Is there anything else that I can do for you?" line, right, Daisy?

The weekend before last, as I prevented a psychotic naked patient from falling off a bedside table while he was choking the life out of me, I used a variation of that line.

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and works as a Behavioral Health RN.

1,839 Likes; 13 Followers; 71,739 Visitors; 5,772 Posts

12 hours ago, Sour Lemon said:

 We were supposed to encourage them to talk about anything and ask for anything while assuring them that we "had time" to listen and provide.
I never did it. Not even once. It would have been more realistic to tell them that I could fly or that I was the queen of England.

look-up-in-the-sky.png.dfc725c54fdf5fda8b08bcd46d6142df.png

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There's definitely a healthy balance between the two. Sometimes families and patients forget that they are not the only ones in the hospital and need to be reminded of others' needs too. I've had some families who see a family member's roommate get turned every two hours and fed all their meals come up to me wanting that "service" for their completely mobile and able family member.

On the other hand, it is never appropriate to complain about staffing issues, wages, and the like to patients and their families. If people have questions about those, I direct them to our HR personnel or director. 

As a nurse, you have to provide reassurance that your patient's will get care. Sometimes I do feel rushed with my patients, but I make sure I'm providing the best, safest, gold-standard care I can. I don't coddle my patients, but I don't neglect them either. I do exactly what they need me to do, no more and no less, when they need me to do it. I leave my gripes about staffing and all that somewhere else, because it has no place in front of my patients.

 

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1 hour ago, JollyBug92 said:

There's definitely a healthy balance between the two. Sometimes families and patients forget that they are not the only ones in the hospital and need to be reminded of others' needs too. I've had some families who see a family member's roommate get turned every two hours and fed all their meals come up to me wanting that "service" for their completely mobile and able family member.

On the other hand, it is never appropriate to complain about staffing issues, wages, and the like to patients and their families. If people have questions about those, I direct them to our HR personnel or director. 

As a nurse, you have to provide reassurance that your patient's will get care. Sometimes I do feel rushed with my patients, but I make sure I'm providing the best, safest, gold-standard care I can. I don't coddle my patients, but I don't neglect them either. I do exactly what they need me to do, no more and no less, when they need me to do it. I leave my gripes about staffing and all that somewhere else, because it has no place in front of my patients.

 

Thank you for sharing. Well said. 

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DowntheRiver has 5 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse.

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On 2/11/2019 at 7:14 PM, TriciaJ said:

Hospitals love to hang banners in visible places:  "Voted Safest Hospital in the Valley"  "#1 in Cardiac cCare"  and my all-time favourite:  "Magnet Facility".

I'm still waiting to see a hospital post their staffing ratios on a banner.

The should post them next to the "prices" they're now forced to put up.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

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Ya know what?  Both of these nurses were talking to an anxious family, not an entitled, belligerent or abusive family.  I would challenge anyone to be so yippy-skippy when the family is demanding steak dinners for everyone and the spouse is threatening to "take you outside and mess you up" if you don't ______" (insert absolutely insane demand.)

Yes, we all need to be positive and set the tone.  But isn't there a little leeway between Nurse Nightmare and Nurse Sunshine, the company whore?

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I agree attitude is important, I had an RN charge nurse who screamed at everyone, the nurses, the cna's and the patient's families.  You are already stressed from the workload and then all that employee drama.  That nurse eventually got fired after screaming at a patients wife that was an extremely nice lady that everyone loved.  She cried when that nurse screamed at her, it broke my heart.  We had a new nurse who started working there who quit after a day.  I was a charge nurse at one of my facilities, I tried everything I could to avoid being what I hated.  If someone failed, I trained and trained and retrained them. The truth is, no one wants to fail so if people are making mistakes it's usually because of lack of knowledge. I was sad when I moved away and had to work somewhere else.  Our team became an awesome team and a family.  Inspiration goes a lot further than denigration.  

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3 hours ago, Bugging said:

I agree attitude is important, I had an RN charge nurse who screamed at everyone, the nurses, the cna's and the patient's families.  You are already stressed from the workload and then all that employee drama.  That nurse eventually got fired after screaming at a patients wife that was an extremely nice lady that everyone loved.  She cried when that nurse screamed at her, it broke my heart.  We had a new nurse who started working there who quit after a day.  I was a charge nurse at one of my facilities, I tried everything I could to avoid being what I hated.  If someone failed, I trained and trained and retrained them. The truth is, no one wants to fail so if people are making mistakes it's usually because of lack of knowledge. I was sad when I moved away and had to work somewhere else.  Our team became an awesome team and a family.  Inspiration goes a lot further than denigration.  

Thank you for sharing. What a great nurse and example you are! And I love that last sentence, "Inspiration goes a lot further than denigration." Amen to that. Joy

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