Surgical NP - page 2

Hi there! I've received quite a few PMs recently regarding how I became a surgical NP. Which specialty is the best route and in general what my typical day looks like so I thought I'd post... Read More

  1. by   thegentlelion
    Hello Alicia777!

    I am so glad I found your post!
    You have the exact position/title that I was looking for. I wasn't sure there was a field like that for nurses. I thought this role was only filled by surgical PAs.

    Just a bit of background: I am graduating with my BSN in May and accepted a nurse residency position in an OR.
    I know that I want to be in the operating room, but pretty sure CRNA is not really what my heart is calling for...
    I really like the technical aspect of being an RNFA and how it is more hands on.

    So from reading your post/responses, would you recommend FNP -> RNFA and then look for a surgical NP position?
    Do you work in a hospital setting/outpatient?
    I know not all states utilize RNFAs. The hospital I will be working at unfortunately do not use RNFAs which the manager mentioned at the interview.
    I would just like any input in terms of the path I should go/what I should be working on now to go that route.

    Thank you!
  2. by   djmatte
    Quote from thegentlelion
    Hello Alicia777!

    I am so glad I found your post!
    You have the exact position/title that I was looking for. I wasn't sure there was a field like that for nurses. I thought this role was only filled by surgical PAs.

    Just a bit of background: I am graduating with my BSN in May and accepted a nurse residency position in an OR.
    I know that I want to be in the operating room, but pretty sure CRNA is not really what my heart is calling for...
    I really like the technical aspect of being an RNFA and how it is more hands on.

    So from reading your post/responses, would you recommend FNP -> RNFA and then look for a surgical NP position?
    Do you work in a hospital setting/outpatient?
    I know not all states utilize RNFAs. The hospital I will be working at unfortunately do not use RNFAs which the manager mentioned at the interview.
    I would just like any input in terms of the path I should go/what I should be working on now to go that route.

    Thank you!
    I honestly think going the ACNP route would be the better option for someone wanting to work in OR and round on their in-patients. Since you will be part of the team controlling those orders and managing patients in some of the most acute times of their care, having that ACNP certificate would be much more useful than an FNP. FNP would only be valuable if you are planning on working on the clinic side with having surgery expectations. But if your future employer doesn't use RNFAs, then I imagine they aren't too sold on using NPs in OR either. I'd say since this will be your first nursing gig, get all the acute care experience you can for sure and go the ACNP route. Then find a hospital that uses RNs more in the OR down the road.
  3. by   Alicia777
    Quote from thegentlelion
    Hello Alicia777!

    I am so glad I found your post!
    You have the exact position/title that I was looking for. I wasn't sure there was a field like that for nurses. I thought this role was only filled by surgical PAs.

    Just a bit of background: I am graduating with my BSN in May and accepted a nurse residency position in an OR.
    I know that I want to be in the operating room, but pretty sure CRNA is not really what my heart is calling for...
    I really like the technical aspect of being an RNFA and how it is more hands on.

    So from reading your post/responses, would you recommend FNP -> RNFA and then look for a surgical NP position?
    Do you work in a hospital setting/outpatient?
    I know not all states utilize RNFAs. The hospital I will be working at unfortunately do not use RNFAs which the manager mentioned at the interview.
    I would just like any input in terms of the path I should go/what I should be working on now to go that route.

    Thank you!
    Hey there! From my perspective back in 2010 when I entered NP school FNP made the most sense-as ANCP programs were not as widely available. ACNP probably is the better choice now, as this will allow you acute inpatient experience which will benefit your practice if you want to be working in a hospital setting. I think you still *could* get into the field with a FNP with a strong OR RN background.

    For me, yes-I work in a hospital. We are a satellite of a larger hospital system in the city. So, I would say its 70/30, with the majority of our cases being day surgery.
  4. by   Dodongo
    Quote from thegentlelion
    Hello Alicia777!

    I am so glad I found your post!
    You have the exact position/title that I was looking for. I wasn't sure there was a field like that for nurses. I thought this role was only filled by surgical PAs.

    Just a bit of background: I am graduating with my BSN in May and accepted a nurse residency position in an OR.
    I know that I want to be in the operating room, but pretty sure CRNA is not really what my heart is calling for...
    I really like the technical aspect of being an RNFA and how it is more hands on.

    So from reading your post/responses, would you recommend FNP -> RNFA and then look for a surgical NP position?
    Do you work in a hospital setting/outpatient?
    I know not all states utilize RNFAs. The hospital I will be working at unfortunately do not use RNFAs which the manager mentioned at the interview.
    I would just like any input in terms of the path I should go/what I should be working on now to go that route.

    Thank you!
    Do what I did - get 2 years of peri-op nursing experience then attend an ACNP program and RNFA program (can be done at the same time). You'll get far more surgical training than a PA (and make sure you display this on your resume and talk it up in your interview) and you'll be utilized just like a PA would.

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