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"Not sure what unit you will be hired into..."

Nurses   (4,703 Views 76 Comments)
by TitaniumPlates TitaniumPlates (Member)

TitaniumPlates has 15 years experience and specializes in ED.

1,596 Visitors; 69 Posts

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You are reading page 5 of "Not sure what unit you will be hired into...". If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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I like using small simple words. 

Are you making a job offer? 

Which position? 

Which shift? 

At what rate of pay? 

* This may need to be directed to HR??

****

I also like keeping my business, my business. 

(Gee, kinda like the area! - instead of have family here and really want to be close to them). 

 

Otherwise, are there other options for employment in that area. Move on, I say. Manager sounds like a misery maker. Best avoided. When relationships start like that (games and cagey comms) ... run!!!

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by Rnis

4,167 Visitors; 164 Posts

On 7/3/2019 at 2:08 PM, TitaniumPlates said:

I suppose you missed the part where the job was posted as ICU? 

That's my point. I never said one disparaging thing about med surg.

...............okay you didn't.   while unusual, I am guessing that perhaps her references left some questions about where her skills will lie or they recently got burned after relocating a nurse. 

Edited by Rnis

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FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

1 Follower; 13,534 Visitors; 1,534 Posts

I didn't read all the posts. It seems like there has been a lot of subtopic discussion.

Going back to the original question, it seems like a problem that could be solved with communication. Not really a big deal.

It's best not to make assumptions, to ask for clarification when you need it and also to clearly state what you require.

If OP's friend is not willing to work outside ICU she just needs to let NM know that.

Example: "Can you clarify what the possibilities are for assignment to a unit? I'm only looking to accept a position in the ICU."

Simple, and no reason to get upset.

 

 

Edited by FolksBtrippin

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lemur00 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Palliative.

4,204 Visitors; 131 Posts

All this trouble could have been saved with an oxford comma 😂

Ie "...garbage shifts, and positions no one can fill..."

Oxford comma ftw. 

That said, I would guess like others that the position is for one of multiple ICUs, or floats between them. Otherwise something may have changed within the facility, *or* manager is trying to see how desperately she wants a job and what she'll accept. Either way, it's good that this was mentioned early. Now all she has to do is politely and firmly say she's interested in only icu--the position may materialize after that if she's that strong of a candidate. And if they really are pulling a bait and switch, it's not a place she'd likely want to be anyway. 

Having a regional system we never deal with this, but experienced critical care positions are usually hard to fill. I can't see why they'd want to let someone that could fill one slip away and I would guess they'd find a position that was acceptable to her. 

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subee has 45 years experience as a MSN, CRNA.

1 Follower; 17,885 Visitors; 1,743 Posts

It's time nurses insisted on written contracts...

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

3 Followers; 114,225 Visitors; 13,218 Posts

33 minutes ago, subee said:

It's time nurses insisted on written contracts...

Every place I've ever worked, once I was verbally offered a job, and I verbally accepted, I was given a written contract/offer letter with the specifics of the position spelled out. The OP's situation had not advanced to that point.

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falconersys has 4 years experience.

579 Visitors; 44 Posts

So it was a shoddy job. I'd move on. It was just a telephone interview, so it's not like she wasted time dressing up and driving across town. It's unfortunate, but there's lots of less than desirable companies out there. Looks like she happened to find one. 

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1,235 Visitors; 45 Posts

I'd be furious if I applied for one position and was given another. As a new grad sometimes you get what you can, but not experienced nurses. I have tele experience and I'd never work med-surg either. No way I want to end up with 8 patients. Med-surg units rarely have decent staffing ratios. By the same token, I'm not interested in the stress of ICU either! If I specialize in something and think I'm applying for that, I wouldn't accept anything else. Life is too short! That's dirty of that hiring manager to pull a bait and switch on someone whose moving so far. Dirty! Personally if someone did me like that, I'd quit on the spot before accepting patient assignment. 

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Pixie.RN has 18 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

6 Followers; 32 Articles; 127,010 Visitors; 13,024 Posts

Ha... I can relate, and then some. 

Back in 2010 I spent 10 months working on commissioning into the Army Nurse Corps as an experienced ER RN. I also spent months ensuring that I came onto active duty with the ER RN job code/special identifier. I had only ever been an ER RN during my career, and I wanted to continue in the ER.

When I finally finished turning my life upside-down and was 1500 miles from home at officer basic in Texas, I met the person who would be my assistant DCN (like a CNO) at my first duty station in Georgia. He asked what kind of nurse I was, and I said "Sir, I am a ER nurse," to which he replied, "Oh, I just gave away the last ER slot." My heart sank. I said, "Well, what do you have?" He said, "Med/surg or mother/baby." I thought I might vomit! I would be totally useless in med/surg or mother/baby, the ER had already been my passion for years, not to mention my only job in nursing. I quickly said "Well sir, I have my CEN and my CPEN, and I commissioned as a 66HM5." (66H is an Army med/surg nurse, the M5 meant we were ER specialized.) He paused and said, "Hmmm, okay... Email me and remind me that we had this conversation." A minute later after we parted, I was on my phone to email him! I did end up in the ER so all's well that ends well, but that was quite a special moment. Lol. I would be pretty clueless outside of the ER! 

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3 Followers; 96,591 Visitors; 36,686 Posts

I once worked a non-nursing job which was not much above minimum wage, a type of manufacturing, where the hiring was done at a cattle call hiring event.  Every unemployed brother and his sister showed up and many were hired.  Several months into the job, the employer decided to do a big change-up.  They called us into a meeting and said that the herd would be culled to a certain number of permanent, versus seasonal or temporary employees, but there was a catch.  Shifts and departments would be changed.  Department managers would be choosing who would get who and there was no guarantee that one would stay on the same shift.  Many of the employees had childcare, family, and transportation issues. What was said about that?  "Inform your manager and your name will be included in the layoff."  Was that bait and switch?  I thought so at the time, even though this was not exactly as highly qualified as an ICU or ER nurse.  Lowest on the totem pole, so, so, so expendable.  Your friend is lucky she was not presented the changes after her hire and relocation.

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3 Followers; 96,591 Visitors; 36,686 Posts

Just for the record, when I read the OP, I did not automatically make a connection between the poster’s phrase containing the word garbage and the last term of the post, med-surg. I had to stretch to see how everybody got so offended so quickly.

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3 Followers; 96,591 Visitors; 36,686 Posts

On 7/6/2019 at 5:24 PM, klone said:

Every place I've ever worked, once I was verbally offered a job, and I verbally accepted, I was given a written contract/offer letter with the specifics of the position spelled out. The OP's situation had not advanced to that point.

The only time I have ever had a written employment contract was when I entered the armed service. The only time I received an offer letter was when I accepted a union job from an employer that prides itself on appearing “classy”. (The letter was very nice, typed on nice bond paper, worthy of keeping). I consider myself lucky that I haven’t gotten some terrible bait and switch job situations throughout the years, all things being equal.

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