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New Grad BSN, RN, PHN, EMT and can’t find work. Legality of working as a CNA?

Nurses   (5,647 Views | 70 Replies)

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VegGal is a BSN, RN and specializes in LTC / ALF, Management, Community Nursing.

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2 hours ago, car48 said:

Just wanted to add, California's regulations are really dumb.

If you have an RN license, and they won't let you take a job as a CNA that is like saying "Sorry, you don't have a bike license.  I know in your day to day life you drive a semi.  But it would be way too dangerous for us to allow you to ride that bike".

Stupid is as stupid does, and California is really stupid.

It's actually even worse. It's not just that you can't work as a CNA because of not having a CNA license (which I actually do understand) but that you can't work as a CNA even if you have a CNA license AND have an RN license.

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myoglobin has 12 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro.

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2 hours ago, VegGal said:

It's actually even worse. It's not just that you can't work as a CNA because of not having a CNA license (which I actually do understand) but that you can't work as a CNA even if you have a CNA license AND have an RN license.

So how about an NP who is also an RN how is this different? How about an MD who is also an NP, and or RN (rare, but I've known a couple)?  Indeed, one of the NP's I worked with in the ICU was the director of surgery at a large hospital in Manilla, but it would have been to difficult for him to get his license in the US so he went the RN/NP track. Another, was an RN/NP who went back to school for her MD and still picks up shifts (about once a month) as an ICU nurse (for fun). 

Edited by myoglobin

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You cannot legally say you are an LPN or CNA if you are not.  You could probably test out on those, though.

Practice interviewing.  I think something is going wrong there.

Hire someone to write your cover letters.  And stop putting all of those certifications on your resume unless those are required for the particular job you are applying for.

Widen your net, as someone suggested above.

Good luck.

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4 hours ago, VegGal said:

It's actually even worse. It's not just that you can't work as a CNA because of not having a CNA license (which I actually do understand) but that you can't work as a CNA even if you have a CNA license AND have an RN license.

I think you could work as a CNA but would be held to the RN standard.

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22 minutes ago, Kooky Korky said:

I think you could work as a CNA but would be held to the RN standard.

It depends upon the state.  Some states actually do prohibit RNs from working as CNAs, etc.  And even if the state allows the practice, one has to find an employer that is willing to hire them into that role.  More and more employers do not.

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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28 minutes ago, caliotter3 said:

It depends upon the state.  Some states actually do prohibit RNs from working as CNAs, etc.  And even if the state allows the practice, one has to find an employer that is willing to hire them into that role.  More and more employers do not.

A lot of people have stated they found this silly, but I think it's because of the fuzziness of the liability should anything happen.  If they're paying a CNA they should expect only the level of competence of a CNA.  If they're paying a CNA who also has an RN license, then what can one expect from a legal standpoint?  It creates enough of a grey area that can make it hard to defend in litigation.

Anyone heard from Risk Manager lately?  We really need him to weigh in.

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Have you tried agencies? I have read some have new grad programs. You can find a few on zip recruiter. I believe UNI (agency) does this for the county hospital Edgemoor. 

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VegGal is a BSN, RN and specializes in LTC / ALF, Management, Community Nursing.

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3 hours ago, myoglobin said:

So how about an NP who is also an RN how is this different? How about an MD who is also an NP, and or RN (rare, but I've known a couple)?  Indeed, one of the NP's I worked with in the ICU was the director of surgery at a large hospital in Manilla, but it would have been to difficult for him to get his license in the US so he went the RN/NP track. Another, was an RN/NP who went back to school for her MD and still picks up shifts (about once a month) as an ICU nurse (for fun). 

I'm not an expert on this, but I can only tell you what the Board told me about working as a CNA when I had an RN license. My story is a little different as I went to school out of state, got my RN license there and then moved to CA. While waiting for my RN license to endorse to CA, I asked if i could pick up some shifts as a CNA (I had a CNA license as well) and they said no, and that once you're an RN, that was no longer an option.

It is my understanding that NPs with RN licenses are allowed to work as RNs, and I know people who do, but that's not the same as an RN working as a CNA.

Edited by VegGal

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I second what another post said about looking in Riverside. I graduated in 2015 from a school in SD.  I didn't want to wait for the new grad cycle to start up (approx. 5 months from graduation date) so I applied to smaller hospitals in San Bernardino and Riverside. I got hired in Victorville 2 weeks after getting my license. It's Victorville, meth central, but it got me my year of experience.  And it's DIRT cheap to live there compared to San Diego.

Try Victorville, Hemet, Menifee, Palm Desert...they're all less desirable locations/hospitals but they probably have openings. 

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twinmommy+2 is a ADN, BSN and specializes in ED.

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On 6/27/2019 at 4:50 PM, oceanhugger said:

Thank you for your honesty. That can’t have been easy at all. But I appreciate you being able to relate. Is it legal for me to eliminate the BSN, RN and put CNA or LVN on there? I feel like having BSN or RN on my resume would hurt my chances of getting hired as a CNA or LVN. Also, is it financially worth it to move for a CNA/LVN position? I’d move in a heartbeat for an RN position.

Unless you have a LVN or CNA certification/license you can't put that beside your name.

 

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myoglobin has 12 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro.

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38 minutes ago, twinmommy+2 said:

Unless you have a LVN or CNA certification/license you can't put that beside your name.

 

I would hold out for the RN position as long term it will probably not be to your advantage to accrue LPN experience.  I suggest that you extensively explore the cities mentioned above in California and if they do not pan out that you consider moving to another high demand state such as Arizona, or Nevada.  Note, that I recently read that when adjusted for cost of living that Nevada had the highest pay for RN's in the nation.  You can always move back to California after getting a year or two of experience (perhaps like my friends who now travel from Florida and earn about 150K each as travel nurses.)

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momoneypls has 16 years experience as a RN and specializes in ER.

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Try the OC and inland empire. Look at some of the Tenet Hospitals, they hire tons of new grads because they make them sign contracts for two years-this helps them doctor their crappy turnover numbers.  The less popular the hospital, think anything with "regional" in the name, the more desperate they are to hire RNs.  San Diego is just slim pickins.

Another option is to try to get licensed in Arizona or Nevada and practice there for a year or two. 

Good Luck

 

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