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New BSN grad fired after 5 weeks of orientation

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Kinar Kinar (New) New

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OK, now you're talking nonsense. EVERYONE knows that the flu shot IS a form of mind control, that's part of it the vax giving you the flu. I've read all about it on the intranet...

LOL!! :roflmao:

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

OK, now you're talking nonsense. EVERYONE knows that the flu shot IS a form of mind control, that's part of it the vax giving you the flu. I've read all about it on the intranet...
Hey Bucky - get your facts straight! I think it was an article I saw in the National Enquirer. Or it may have been People magazine. Can't remember. :roflmao: (No offense meant.)

But re OP's post - there's no mention I saw if you were in an at-will state. Makes a difference if they don't like you for whatever reason.

And PP iPinkRN made a good point. Management may have viewed you as a complainer really early in their employ. That is a big red flag waving at them.

I would also suggest you to try & think back if you made any negative comments to co-workers or if somebody else overheard you doing so. It takes a while to learn who can be trusted or NOT trusted in your work unit. And in today's cut-throat work environment, some people just LOVE to run to mgt and tattle on newbies. That old WWII slogan "loose lips sink ships" may be applicable here.

For your sake, I hope it was just some quirk of that facility. But take the experience and learn from it. Good luck.

This is untrue. Past employers can divulge any information they choose to about their previous employees, so long as the information is truthful. And it is perfectly legal.

What Can Employers Say About Former Employees?

And as a matter of practicality, if the employer says it, that makes it truthful. I received that tidbit from an employment attorney.

You asked for a new preceptor then asked to be transferred to a different unit...unfortunately those where reasons enough to let you go.

You worked a little over a month and so I wouldn't list the job on your résumé. New grads being fired during orientation is not unheard of, but you need to grow from the experience.

Most applications require actual application forms to be submitted (along with the resume). It's standard for the form to say "list all places and dates of employment". If the OP fails to include the fact she WAS employed, and is asked about it in an interview, she has to choose either lying in person ("I was looking for a job with a good fit") OR admitting to lying on the form ("oh, yeah, I DID work during that time, but didn't put it down because....").

Lying on an application is grounds for termination if hired, and rejection from application process if discovered prior to hiring. Lose/Lose scenario.

iPink, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum. Has 8 years experience.

I said resume for a reason. Submitting an application requires more detail, i.e. supervisor names and phones numbers, etc which would normally not be included on resumes. Still standing by my statement.

Sent from iPink's phone via allnurses app

TSgtRodrigues, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 2 years experience.

A background check with your social shows your criminal background, not your working background! This is why they ask you where you worked, dates, why left etc.

They let a new grad go at 5 weeks in? I feel like something more is missing! If there really is nothing missing, than something's not right & the hospital messed up! It just doesn't seem reasonable that they let a new grad go at 5 weeks because they didn't get along with the preceptor. Was the OP late? Unwilling to work nights/weekends? Were they argumentative? Did they talk bad about the preceptor to other coworkers? But then again, you are a new grad and you ask for a new preceptor & to switch units within 5 weeks? They may have seen the OP as unwilling to change themselves! Ask for a new preceptor....okay, that's cool, but if you are told no, move on and try and MAKE it work, don't try to find another way out!

I am in the same exact boat as you. I started in January 2015. I had barely 4-5 weeks of quick disorganized day shift training with a scatter brain preceptor. And boy how much everyone lies and are sneaky as hell.

I was hired for nights so then I went nights. Not even 2 weeks and I was on my own. My manager called me and said there are a lot of complaints from your patients.

I cannot believe I went to school for this crap. What a waste of bachelors degree. I am so depressed right now.

There isn't anything else open to new grads but bedside care which obviously no one wants to do.

The support is lacking completely. They act like they support you but they actually don't. Very sneaky politics and behavior involved.

I feel your pain. I think I will end up looking for a full-time retail job or something to finish paying my loans as I am not able to hold on to this job.

I will find out to see what happens next. I think they are trying to push me out and get rid of me. Talk about professionalism right :(

I am in the same exact boat as you. I started in January 2015. I had barely 4-5 weeks of quick disorganized day shift training with a scatter brain preceptor. And boy how much everyone lies and are sneaky as hell.

I was hired for nights so then I went nights. Not even 2 weeks and I was on my own. My manager called me and said there are a lot of complaints from your patients.

I cannot believe I went to school for this crap. What a waste of bachelors degree. I am so depressed right now.

There isn't anything else open to new grads but bedside care which obviously no one wants to do.

The support is lacking completely. They act like they support you but they actually don't. Very sneaky politics and behavior involved.

I feel your pain. I think I will end up looking for a full-time retail job or something to finish paying my loans as I am not able to hold on to this job.

I will find out to see what happens next. I think they are trying to push me out and get rid of me. Talk about professionalism right :(

I'm obviously not in a position to comment on the quality of your orientation, but 6-7 weeks of orientation does not seem like a matter of "barely" or "not even." A lot of new grads struggle with the transition from being a student nurse to being a practicing RN. In school, the faculty is there to help and support you. Once you are a licensed professional, even as a new grad, there is a much greater expectation that you will function as a licensed professional and not a student. What "support" are you expecting that you feel you are not getting? And what are you doing to try to turn the situation around, before you give up on nursing entirely? As you note, you put a lot of time, effort, and expense into your degree. Lots of new grads have a bad experience, one way or another, in their first job and are able to learn and move on successfully from that experience. I hope you will make an effort to do so before throwing in the towel. Best wishes!

dudette10, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Academics. Has 10 years experience.

Being fired five weeks in...something is going on, and I don't know if it's JUST the preceptor. Multiple complaints from patients? What were the complaints about? With your being a new grad, I'm going to make a big assumption and wonder if you're so focused on doing your job that the patients feel "left out" of your nursing.

As for the preceptor, I used to believe that new grads who endlessly complained about the competence of their preceptors was sort of crap because I (again) assumed that the preceptors were chosen for their experience and ability to teach new grads. Now I know that assumption was very, very wrong. At my workplace, one of the frequent preceptors is a new grad himself with barely a year's experience! He comes to me to ask about stuff (which I gladly provide), but he's a preceptor?! My opinion of him as a preceptor has nothing to do with him (he learns quickly); it's his lack of experience. Another frequent preceptor has her own time management issues, can be very flighty/distracted, and has made enemies of the CNAs because her stress shows through in her curt and sometimes disrespectful delegation. Her answer to her own stress is to text her friends to vent. There are only a handful of long-term nurses with time management and assessment down pat, but I've noticed that they do not get orientees. Not sure why. I've offered to precept, but because I'm a float nurse, they won't let me do it although I work one floor 90% of the time.

If you came from my workplace on a particular floor, I would definitely say part of the problem is the precepting.

This is untrue. Past employers can divulge any information they choose to about their previous employees, so long as the information is truthful. And it is perfectly legal.

What Can Employers Say About Former Employees?

This isn't my field and I could be wrong, though truthful + legal does not = ANY.

-we fired her because of productivity issues” vs. she has productivity issues” aren't exactly the same. Might want to take a look at the disclaimer in the link, also.

And as a matter of practicality, if the employer says it, that makes it truthful. I received that tidbit from an employment attorney.

Interesting… Considering there are lawsuits floating around regarding defamation

Anyway… OP. hope you learned from this experience and found another job.