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Need compensation advice at my job

Nurses   (935 Views 12 Comments)
by Aliens05 Aliens05 (Member) Member Nurse

Aliens05 has <1 years experience .

1,937 Profile Views; 132 Posts

Ok so to start off let me give a little back story. I began with my company as a medication aide and I started at 10.50/hr. This was around 7-8 years ago. In that time they changed the starting pay to 12.00/hr for new employees and gave older employees all a base raise package. By the time I was finished with my LPN classes I was making 14.68/hr with my raises as a med aide.

Fast forward to getting my LPN license (5 months ago) and they start LPNs at 16.65/hr. (This is an easy group home to work at). They offered me only 17.50/hr max. I took it knowing I was almost done with my RN. Today my company announced to all medication aides that they will be starting new employees at 15/hr and all older employees will receive 2.50/hr raises. I calculated it out and if I would have stayed as a medication aide I would right now be making 17.25/hr compared to my 17.50 as an LPN.

My dilemma is that I just passed my RN boards and will move over to RN with the company in about a week. We start RNs at around 25.69/hr. What would be the best way to negotiate a fair wage considering my 8 years with the company and the raises that have occurred along the way.

I know the arguement would be that I am a brand new nurse, but we also don't do IVs, or catheters or anything in my facility, mostly paperwork and watch over residents. I do feel though that 8 years of raises should count for something over starting wage. Any suggestions?? Thanks in advance everyone.

Edited by Aliens05

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SC_RNDude has 7 years experience.

533 Posts; 16,581 Profile Views

Like you said, you are a brand new RN. I think most employers anywhere would start you the same as any new RN. The raises you received along the way in other positions don't matter.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,244 Posts; 30,651 Profile Views

Many employers don't "count" LVN experience when it comes to negotiating RN wages, but some employers do. Have you looked around to see what else is out there? Better offers from other employers might encourage your current employer to work with you a little bit.

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Aliens05 has <1 years experience.

132 Posts; 1,937 Profile Views

First thanks for the replies. I have looked a bit into it. As a new rn i know I do need hospital experience.. However the place I work at is a long term disabled home. Schedule is M-F 7-3. I've known the same 5 residents I work with for over 6 years and needless to say i care a whole lot about them.

I guess I need to weigh better pay over hours and enjoying my job. The company I work for is a smaller local company and I guess my dilemma is that all the other care staff got very big raises aside from me as an Rn. Lpns and medication aids got 2.50 more per hour (my house has a total of 2 staff nurses myself and one other lady). So it kinda feels like they are coming out with the raises the same week i transition from lpn to rn but my raise doesn't carry over. At this point im. Just venting.... Thanks again for the replies.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,244 Posts; 30,651 Profile Views

First thanks for the replies. I have looked a bit into it. As a new rn i know I do need hospital experience.. However the place I work at is a long term disabled home. Schedule is M-F 7-3. I've known the same 5 residents I work with for over 6 years and needless to say i care a whole lot about them.

I guess I need to weigh better pay over hours and enjoying my job. The company I work for is a smaller local company and I guess my dilemma is that all the other care staff got very big raises aside from me as an Rn. Lpns and medication aids got 2.50 more per hour (my house has a total of 2 staff nurses myself and one other lady). So it kinda feels like they are coming out with the raises the same week i transition from lpn to rn but my raise doesn't carry over. At this point im. Just venting.... Thanks again for the replies.

It's well known that the best way to work your way up the pay scale is to hop around a bit.

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Aliens05 has <1 years experience.

132 Posts; 1,937 Profile Views

Sour. Are u meaning get on somewhere.. Then when u leave for somewhere different use your current wage as leverage to negotiate higher at your new job?

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,244 Posts; 30,651 Profile Views

Sour. Are u meaning get on somewhere.. Then when u leave for somewhere different use your current wage as leverage to negotiate higher at your new job?

Exactly. It seems like the nurses who stay in any one place the longest are always the lowest paid. Employers may offer a sweeter deal to get you on board, but if you've been there for ten years and aren't likely to leave, they have little incentive to pay you more.

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3 Followers; 36,950 Posts; 98,120 Profile Views

I would look around to see what other employers offer, but not make any moves until you actually have the RN license so that you don't get shortchanged from the get go again. You are dealing with one of the pitfalls that can befall a person who progresses in their job classifications or who stays at an employer long after newer employers start benefitting from new wage scales. This is happening to many caught up in the changes where the minimum wage is rising.

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JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU.

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Exactly. It seems like the nurses who stay in any one place the longest are always the lowest paid. Employers may offer a sweeter deal to get you on board, but if you've been there for ten years and aren't likely to leave, they have little incentive to pay you more.

Yep, exactly this which is unfortunate to an extent. But I learned this after staying loyal to my first company for 8 years - boy what a difference switching jobs made. And even at my current company that I started in almost 2 years ago, I know I am making a lot more than colleagues who have been here for 10+ years.

It is similar to cruise lines who really have no reason to offer incentives to their customers who have shown loyalty by repeatedly rebooking cruises with that line. Instead, they try to target the new customers from other lines who have never sailed with that company. Loyalty means nothing these days (sorry, I've got my next vacation on my mind!)

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Alex_RN has 4 years experience as a BSN.

328 Posts; 3,983 Profile Views

I have always worked in union environments where my wage was predetermined based upon education and experience. Even in that environment, you are still a new RN. Don't burn any bridges but it always good to look around and see what other places are offering.

When I think about how I like my current coworkers and patients, I remind myself that there will be coworkers and patients at the next job, and I will probably like them, too.

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SC_RNDude has 7 years experience.

533 Posts; 16,581 Profile Views

Exactly. It seems like the nurses who stay in any one place the longest are always the lowest paid. Employers may offer a sweeter deal to get you on board, but if you've been there for ten years and aren't likely to leave, they have little incentive to pay you more.

I once started a new job, and soon met a nurse at my new place who was leaving to go to the exact unit at worked on at another hospital. We both had similar experience, about two years. We were essentially trading places with each other, and we were both getting raises by doing so.

Edited by SC_RNDude
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inthecosmos has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Varied.

493 Posts; 7,173 Profile Views

Congratulations! Discuss this with HR, they'll have the best idea of what they can and will give you.

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