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12 Month ADN Program-No Bachelors or Waitlist

Hello,

I am an undergraduate student with biology as my major. I am interested in entering the nursing field to become an NP (ADN-NP). I literally have one class to complete for my bachelors degree, and have finished all my nursing pre-reqs. However, I was wondering if there were any 12 month ADN programs that do not require a bachelors in another field (or that just "prefer one") that are under $10,000 for the whole program (including out-of-state students). The reason for me choosing this route is because I have 2 yeas left of undergraduate financial aid, but cannot receive any grants if I finish my last class and already possess a bachelors degree. I plan on getting my ADN first, finishing my last class for my bachelors, and then doing an ADN with non-nursing bachelors to NP program. Thanks for your help!

Note: I also do not want to be put on a wait list.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 9 years experience.

For-profit schools do indeed have options for "no wait list". However, none of them are going to be 12 months only and all of them are going to be far more expensive than is reasonable to pay for an ADN degree and most of them are substandard in terms of quality of education that leaves you able to pass NCLEX on the first try and many to most of them are going to leave you with a degree that is unable to transfer credits toward your goal of getting into NP school eventually.

There are no good shortcuts, in otherwords.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

You are looking for a unicorn.

As not.done.yet stated, you're not going to find that type of shortcut.

Mine was 10 months but I was an LPN first and it was a transition program for LPN. That's the only situation I've seen where it's less than a year.

I have only seen and know of 1 year or less programs that are for LPNs. Otherwise you have to have a bachelors for an accelerated program.

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 8 years experience.

I just deleted my post. Oy.

I have BS Biology. I opted for 2yr ADN to get my RN. Then I worked for a year before doing RN-BSN. ADN is cheap if you do a comm college. The BS will get you ahead b/c you shouldn't need any pre-reqs. I did that in 4 semesters and it was cheap ( you can get subsidized Fed loans even with a BS). My first job gave tuition reimbursement as a sign on bonus. ADN was

I would finish the BS and do an ADN so you can get your RN and get to work. ADN to NP is going to be tough. I had to have a minimum of 2 years nursing experience to apply for MSN.

Hope you find something that works for you!!

Thanks for your feedback. I was wondering why I would not be able to do the NP. There seems to be schools that have ADN with non-nursing bachelors to NP.

Thanks and congrats on the MSN! This comment really helped a lot. I was trying to decide between 2 years vs 1 year ADN, but most community colleges have a wait list and are 2 years :/ I want to start working ASAP. I will give this thought and see how life goes.

adventure_rn, BSN

Specializes in NICU, PICU.

Given your background and goals, perhaps PA school would be a better alternative? If you aren't interested in working as a bedside nurse and prefer to go straight into advanced practice, PA might be faster and less expensive.

SopranoKris, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 5 years experience.

Given your background and goals, perhaps PA school would be a better alternative? If you aren't interested in working as a bedside nurse and prefer to go straight into advanced practice, PA might be faster and less expensive.

I was going to make the same suggestion. Finish the BS and then apply to PA school. NPs & PAs are similar in practice and it would be the shortest route for you, if that is your main objective for an expedited education. Most PA schools do require a certain number of direct patient care hours, so you may have to work as a CNA, phlebotomist, etc., to gain those hours.

Good luck with your decision :D

bgxyrnf, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Tele; ED; ICU. Has 10 years experience.

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bgxyrnf, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Tele; ED; ICU. Has 10 years experience.

12 Month ADN Program-No Bachelors or Waitlist... that are under $10,000 for the whole program (including out-of-state students)

Ask Santa... I'm sure he can hook you up.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

Hello,

I am an undergraduate student with biology as my major. I am interested in entering the nursing field to become an NP (ADN-NP). I literally have one class to complete for my bachelors degree, and have finished all my nursing pre-reqs. However, I was wondering if there were any 12 month ADN programs that do not require a bachelors in another field (or that just "prefer one") that are under $10,000 for the whole program (including out-of-state students). The reason for me choosing this route is because I have 2 yeas left of undergraduate financial aid, but cannot receive any grants if I finish my last class and already possess a bachelors degree. I plan on getting my ADN first, finishing my last class for my bachelors, and then doing an ADN with non-nursing bachelors to NP program. Thanks for your help!

Note: I also do not want to be put on a wait list.

This is not the route you want to take to the end goal.

This remind me of the old joke about the auto repair shop with the sign that reads: Good. Fast. Cheap. Pick two

OP, a program that is good and fast will not be cheap. A program that is fast and cheap won't be good. A program that is good and cheap won't be fast.

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 8 years experience.

i didn't have to wait to get into the ADN program. I got in the first year I applied because of the BS in Biology.

bitter_betsy, BSN

Specializes in Emergency / Disaster. Has 1 years experience.

My understanding is that schools that have wait lists do so for those students that don't make the "first cut". It isn't - you automatically get in next semester - its - well if Sally, Bobby and Joey don't accept our offer then Nancy, Marcy and Jack get offers. Once the semester starts - everyone starts over. It also isn't an apply and start thing. Right now I can't apply until September of 2018 to begin in January 2019 or I can apply in January 2019 for August of 2019. It takes time. No matter what - there just aren't short cuts. Also - your Federal Loans tap out at $57,500 (I think - maybe $52,500) whatever that number is - thats the amount of aid you can take - it doesn't go by years. You can still get Perkins Loans and possibly some government stuff. I have my BS and I'm in my repayment period - when I start nursing school - I have to come up with $16,000 out of pocket, get personal loans or hope for scholarships in order to finish. I'm paying for pre-reqs out of pocket in order to save the student loan $$ I do have left.

Thanks for the reply! True, true. I just think NP may have higher earning potential and more flexibility since in almost half the states, an NP can open up his/her own practice. Not sure though...

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 8 years experience.

but you still have to have an RN to get into an NP program

Also, I have 2 AS, 2 BS and MS and an MA. All Fed loans. Not a $57K limit.

Neo Soldier, BSN, RN

Has 5 years experience.

There are no ADN programs that are only one year. They are usually two years. You can apply for scholarships and there are the ones specific for nurses. I think you should speak to a counselor to see if there's a possibility of an appeal for financial aid. When I got into my nursing program, I had to do that and so did most of my classmates. It was a quick and easy process and I didn't even have to write a letter. About the no wait list, there is no guarantee on that but your best bet is to apply to multiple schools and also, find out what they're looking for. In California, some schools have what is called the point system. It's a rubric that tells you where you rank and your chances of getting into the program. Some schools will give you points if you have a CNA, EMT or paramedic license, or if you have taken statistics and passed with a C or better. There are schools that have minimum enrollment and so you may have a higher chance of getting in. For example, I applied to a school way in the desert. It was a two hour drive from where I live. i got in with minimal effort. I didn't go because I got into somewhere else. That's extreme but it's something to look into. Good luck.

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