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Manager Insists....

Specializes in Critical Care Emergency Room. Has 29 years experience.

On a new position for 7 months....last week the manager told me that to comply with the policy day shift nurses (12 hour) stay on the unit until 1930. Typically in a high acuity area after you give report and check in with the patient you can leave. The manager derives her view from those 7 minutes totaled up are a lot of hours of wasted labor. So even after clocking out at 1923 she wants nurses to stay.I point out that the unit is steady and many of us have lives which benefit from leaving a few minutes after report is completed...and yet she is adamant and insistent. I pointed out that I will have to pull back from full time to a .6 next year. She was clearly shocked.

First time in 25 years as an RN I've ever heard of this. Anyone else?

NurseCard, ADN

Specializes in Med/Surge, Psych, LTC, Home Health. Has 13 years experience.

Well, then you definitely should be clocking out at 1930 then, not 1923.

If you are expected to be there and be on duty... a lot can happen in

seven minutes.

Other than that, I don't see that an extra seven minutes is that big

of a deal. I understand the part about having a busy life, believe

me. I have a 10 year old, and a 15 year old daughter who would

just as soon I never left her side! But... it's seven minutes.

NurseCard, ADN

Specializes in Med/Surge, Psych, LTC, Home Health. Has 13 years experience.

OTOH, it is a high acuity unit? So, if someone happens to code

within that seven minutes... you are expected to help with the code,

and then you are stuck there for a while. So in that regard, I

see your point. If it were a lower acuity unit, or a nursing home

it would be different.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 14 years experience.

If she wants you to stay until 1930, then you should not clock out until 1930. I think she's being ridiculous, personally. Pick your battles.

Emergent, RN

Has 27 years experience.

I think you are sweating the small stuff here.

alaskaman

Specializes in Critical Care Emergency Room. Has 29 years experience.

I've just never heard of it. Managers typically will be flexible. If something happens there are plenty of nurses to help out. I wonder if I told her that after the year (to repay 25k relo) I'll be leaving if that would make it easier. Sometimes I will only have one patient at the end of a shift. Its a nice feeling to get home early. =)

NurseCard, ADN

Specializes in Med/Surge, Psych, LTC, Home Health. Has 13 years experience.

I honestly have never heard of it either.

Emergent, RN

Has 27 years experience.

You are dealing with a time obsessed soul. I know, because time is my personal hang up. Humor her...

Davey Do

Specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge. Has 41 years experience.

I've just never heard of it.

At Wrongway Regional Medical Center, the Director of the Psych side vacillates from allowing us to to clock out at 0723, to staying until 0730, to contacting the CEO if we have one minute of overtime!

I just usually clock in at 1853 and clock out anywhere from 0723 to 07whatever.

Edited by Davey Do
typo

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

On a new position for 7 months....last week the manager told me that to comply with the policy day shift nurses (12 hour) stay on the unit until 1930. Typically in a high acuity area after you give report and check in with the patient you can leave. The manager derives her view from those 7 minutes totaled up are a lot of hours of wasted labor. So even after clocking out at 1923 she wants nurses to stay.I point out that the unit is steady and many of us have lives which benefit from leaving a few minutes after report is completed...and yet she is adamant and insistent. I pointed out that I will have to pull back from full time to a .6 next year. She was clearly shocked.

First time in 25 years as an RN I've ever heard of this. Anyone else?

So she doesn't like rounding in the employee's favor, but she's probably OK with rounding in the employer's favor? Maybe she needs to make changes and pay by the minute, instead ...or the second. She sounds like a petty moron. I probably wouldn't quit a job if that were the only issue, but it would definitely annoy me.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

I don't think it's unreasonable to expect someone to stay for the entirety of their shift. Shift change is a big risk time for falls at my facility. If day shift is there til 7:30 that could give nightshift a chance to look over charts or pull meds while days still has eyes on the unit, and vice versa in the morning. But you should absolutely be clocking out the time you leave.

crazin01

Specializes in tele, ICU, CVICU. Has 12 years experience.

if you're on the unit floor you must be clocked in. Heaven forbid you or a colleague injure yourself at work and you have already clocked out, time clock shows you as off-duty.

I have seen the 7 minute window at quite a different facilities.

Good luck; she sounds like a peach!!! :-)

I was pulling myself together and heading for the door three or even two minutes before the official end of the shift. The client jumped me one day, so I told her off, so to speak, and immediately stopped coming in up to 40-45 minutes early. Now I sit in my car until it is the top of the hour on the dot. Anal retentiveness can go in both directions. I was giving a lot of free labor in those 20 to 45 early minutes before the official start of my shift.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

What time keeping system is in use? I work from home using Kronos and understand that I cannot sign out early,have a 5 minute window to sign out or they have to pay me OT. Pick your battles, this should not be one of them.

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

If you're scheduled until 1930 then you've got nothing to complain about, if you're done with report at 1923 then you still need to finish your shift, even if at that involves is putting out fires for 7 minutes so that the oncoming shift can finish getting their report or just get their plan together.

There are few things that annoy me more than having someone who's clocked out 7 minutes early tell me that my patient needs help with this or that while I'm still giving report because they can't help me with it because they've already clocked out and have their jacket on to go home. Finish your shift.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 25 years experience.

Of all the potential work issues in nursing jobs, I don't think the 7 minute thing is something to go to the mat over. Particularly if you're scheduled until the half hour.

Actually, if this is the worst thing you have to complain about, you're pretty lucky...

KRVRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU.

Everything gets rounded to the nearest quarter hour. 1922 rounds to 1915 and 1923 rounds to 1930. If you are to work 12 hrs you have to clock out no sooner than 1923, otherwise you only worked 11hrs 45 min. (off clock 30 min for lunch). Definitely stay long enough or you might be docked 15 min of PTO.

But she wants you to clock at 1930 instead of 1923? Maybe that's so she doesn't feel like you got 7 free minutes.

missmollie, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Neuroscience. Has 4 years experience.

I'm guessing that the facility you work at automatically takes your half hour break for lunch out. Staying until 7:30 fulfills the requirement of 12 hours shifts. You clock out at 7:23, and you're getting paid for 7 minutes that you didn't work.

If she needs you to stay until 7:30, then do it. Just make report a little more detailed. It's 7 minutes.

If you're being paid through 1930 you should be there on the floor until 1930.

Ready to work. Help someone to the toilet or whatever.

It kind of isn't right because you've likely given up lots and lots of breaks over the years. but the

purpose of shift overlap is to give report and steady the ward while oncoming staff get finished with

report.

be sure to take all of your breaks and don't give away any more free work. but as PP said, pick your battles.

AutumnApple

Specializes in M/S, Pulmonary, Travel, Homecare, Psych.. Has 12 years experience.

Early in my career, my manager responded to pettiness (gossip gone too far for instance) with a "If this is what concerns you, you don't have enough to do" point of view. In a lot of cases she was right too. I kept that approach in mind as I became an ADON later on.

I think this theory applies to your manager. Seriously, she needs something to do to occupy her.

Perhaps for Christmas get her one of those activity bibs to wear. You never know, it might help.

It's not about '23 vs '30 punch times. What I'd be concerned about is whether your nursing was taken care of. Yes, if you're punching out at '23 and there are orders left undone and/or patients on the call light for pain coverage, I'd have an issue. If no such issues are present, well, she needs to find something more constructive to do.

Edited by AutumnApple

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