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MAGNET Designation

Professionalism   (9,369 Views | 53 Replies)
by kgg6 kgg6 Member

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You are reading page 4 of MAGNET Designation. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

stickit34 has 5 years experience and specializes in Pediatrics.

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I work at a Magnet hospital, and I can tell you the nurses at our hospital are not content with their jobs. Management demands more research projects, education, policy changes, public relations reports and more, all without more pay, if you're lucky to even receive any type of compensation for it. This is on top of a serious understaffing issues, which has caused a shift of more nurses to look elsewhere and move. It could be different elsewhere, but where I am currently working, the Magnet status has decreased our quality of life and eventually it will impact the quality of care our patients receive.

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tokmom has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff.

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Anecdotally I can share that I have worked at three magnet hospitals and although the nurses at one of them seemed very happy and proud of the designation the other two were a fairly miserable bunch overall. I personally believe it is largely hype and that if the benefits they are trying to sell floor nurses is involvement in things like "nursing research", posters and committees done on their free time they are out of their ever lovin minds, lol.

Actually, by being on committees and being involved in the profession, can decrease burnout in the profession for some nurses. Part of burnout is not feeling in control of the work environment.

Edited by tokmom

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

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For me, working at a Magnet facility has been a breath of fresh air. I know *I* am happier, and as a float nurse, most of the nurses I work with throughout the hospital are happy. However, I have friends who have worked at other Magnet facilities who absolutely hated it, said it was all too political, and they high-tailed it out of there. I'm not sure that being Magnet is the definitive factor. If a hospital has established a culture of shared governance, nurse empowerment, EBP, etc. it will be a great place to work. I don't think becoming Magnet automatically brings all of those things.

I don't doubt that you work at a good hospital. My observation is that good places to work are good places to work, and that bad places are bad and that there is absolutly zero corrolation between good, bad and Magnet. With the exception that some bad places to work try to use Magnet as a bandaid to cover up how bad they suck.

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Jules A is a MSN and specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

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Actually, by being on committees and being involved in the profession can decreaseburnout in the profession for some nurses because part of burnout is not feeling in control of the work environment.

Sure and like I said I know nurses who are very proud of their hospital's magnet status but speaking only for myself I don't do anything for free and I did not feel the many poster projects, bulletin boards or committees that RNs were "encouraged" to participate in did anything to empower the nursing staff or improve conditions. Personally it seemed more about the hype for the facility than benefit for staff.

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by Guest

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But it is a way for someone somewhere to make $$ in healthcare...marketing special designations.

Kind of like endless certifications for nurses...

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tokmom has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff.

4,568 Posts; 48,258 Profile Views

Sure and like I said I know nurses who are very proud of their hospital's magnet status but speaking only for myself I don't do anything for free and I did not feel the many poster projects, bulletin boards or committees that RNs were "encouraged" to participate in did anything to empower the nursing staff or improve conditions. Personally it seemed more about the hype for the facility than benefit for staff.

That's why I italicized the word "some". There "some" nurses that feel as though they are making a difference and will do those projects for free because it's value added to them and their own personal reasons.

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ArtClassRN has 8 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Med Surg.

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Now I know what REALLY makes a nurse empowered. A good union.

You oughta try both (Magnet and union). It's pretty good.

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101 Posts; 3,684 Profile Views

I don't doubt that you work at a good hospital. My observation is that good places to work are good places to work, and that bad places are bad and that there is absolutly zero corrolation between good, bad and Magnet. With the exception that some bad places to work try to use Magnet as a bandaid to cover up how bad they suck.

That is exactly my point! :)

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Jules A is a MSN and specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

2 Followers; 8,863 Posts; 47,377 Profile Views

That's why I italicized the word "some". There "some" nurses that feel as though they are making a difference and will do those projects for free because it's value added to them and their own personal reasons.

Yes but I wonder why nurses would feel it necessary to do things for free when I have yet to ever hear any administration ask a physician to do something without being compensated in the interest of "personal enrichment". If these tasks are so beneficial why aren't they worth compensation? Again just my opinion but I find it insulting and think that if we collectively insist on safe working conditions and fair compensation for everything we do it benefits our profession and our patients.

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tokmom has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff.

4,568 Posts; 48,258 Profile Views

Yes but I wonder why nurses would feel it necessary to do things for free when I have yet to ever hear any administration ask a physician to do something without being compensated in the interest of "personal enrichment". If these tasks are so beneficial why aren't they worth compensation? Again just my opinion but I find it insulting and think that if we collectively insist on safe working conditions and fair compensation for everything we do it benefits our profession and our patients.

I agree with you. I do a lot of committee work, however I charge for my time.

If the majority request payment for work completed and are denied, then I wouldn't be signing up either. But if a select few enjoy the work because it helps them feel in control of their work environment, which lessens burnout, I say let them.

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sistrmoon specializes in Oncology.

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I DID notice that the Magnet hospital's policies and procedures are more up to date with the latest standards of evidence based practice. For example, the non-Magnet hospital has a policy to change a peripheral IV site every 72 hours (or was it 96? Some set number.) The Magnet hospital's policy is to change peripheral IV sites only when necessary. I did not look up the research, but supposedly this policy is based on evidence that unnecessarily changing IV sites actually introduces more bacteria and increases risk for infection for the patient.

My experience was opposite. The non-magnet hospital is much better about constantly changing to follow evidence based practice, including the example you mention.

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27 Posts; 2,295 Profile Views

The Magnet designation is pure fiction. I work at a Magnet hospital in the East SF Bay, and the only way we got Magnet was by buying it. No sooner had the Magnet surveyors left, then Management went back to understaffing the floors, starving us for supplies, ignoring patient needs, while being paid HUGE bonuses. My hospital has gone from Magnet into the mud in three years, and nursing staff are being run into the ground. And those plum committee slots go to junior RNs who are related to senior management so they can be groomed for advancement. Payroll fraud is rampant (i.e. forcing RNs to work off of the clock), training fraud is rampant (forcing RNs to sign off on training they have not received), anyone who doesn't "go with the program" is threatened with counseling for time management/negative attitude. Hospitals are business, and cr@p rolls downhill, where it drowns bedside nurses.

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