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Leaving before 1 year? Don't know what to do..

Nurses   (1,168 Views 22 Comments)
by Birdsofprey Birdsofprey (New) New

567 Profile Views; 18 Posts

Hi All,

I have been working on a telemetry unit in a public hospital in NYC and this month makes 6 months experience for me as a new RN (I was an LPN prior to this but it was in a clinic setting). I am so stressed out and burned out already due to short staffing and caring for 10-12 patients per night (many of which are severely ill and should be in a stepdown or even ICU). I am learning by sheer force. I know that nursing does not have to be as bad as this, but in a way I just want to run and do home care or something that still in the nursing field but is not as stressful as this. I have trying to get in with private hospitals but they want me to call back at 1 year of experience(6 more months from now). A friend recently told about her experience as a UAS assessment RN and enjoys it. I am wondering several things-

1) Is leaving a hospital job prior to 1 year of experience going to bite me in the a## later? 

2) If I leave for a less demanding/stressful position (UAS, dialysis clinic, or home care gig or something like that), I am concerned that this will make it very difficult for me to return to the hospital setting later (ideally I want to do ICU or ER)?

NOTE: Further complicating matters is that I am finishing my RN to BSN program online and am less marketable due to this. I feel kind of stuck in my current position until I finish it, or get a year of experience. I just don't really know what to do here. I almost want to plow thru my BSN course work just to be more marketable but this will add even more craziness to my schedule of working 12 hour night shifts and already being a student at the same time.

I could just tough it out for another 6 months... but a large part of me would rather just take another job ASAP. Perhaps I am being too impatient?

I know there are many posts about things like this. I know that adjusting to an RN career is difficult. But I know it is not this bad in other places. I guess if anyone has advice or words of encouragement, this can help. Much appreciated. Even if it is just to politely say this is "how it goes".

 

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inthecosmos has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Varied.

493 Posts; 7,168 Profile Views

Can you internally transfer?  If so, this may be a more viable option for you and your situation.  A change of scenery without burning bridges or setting a poor tone for your career.  Leaving when you're not in a good headspace is entirely OKAY!  In order to optimize patient outcomes, we need to provide ourselves with plenty of self-care first.

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18 Posts; 567 Profile Views

Thank you for your input- I cannot transfer internally until 1 year (believe me, I have checked). Nice Daria avatar by the way.

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RNNPICU has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PICU.

1,032 Posts; 12,233 Profile Views

One thing to consider is that you are now with just 6 months experience and you are getting used to working as an RN.  Some of what you are experiencing is just getting used to your role, I think you definitely should wait until the 1 year mark.  It sounds like you are just now learning the realities of hospital work and it is going to take time to build a routine and become established. Again, you only have 6 months as a new RN in a hospital, there is still so much more to learn, and with each shift you work, you are learning to juggle responsibilites and become more proficient in your practice.

Answers to your questions:

1. Is leaving a hospital job prior to 1 year of experience going to bite me in the a## later?

Yes. with only 6 months experience you are like a new grad. It could be viewed as negative if you "only lasted" 6 months in a hospital setting.

2) If I leave for a less demanding/stressful position (UAS, dialysis clinic, or home care gig or something like that), I am concerned that this will make it very difficult for me to return to the hospital setting later (ideally I want to do ICU or ER)?

it will make it very difficult to return to the bedside if you leave now.  If you eventually want the ICU or ER, stay on the unit you are in and get that experience. POsitions such as home care cannot prepare you in the same way tha in-patient hospital experience does.

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Undercat has 41 years experience as a BSN, MSN, CRNA and specializes in Retired.

78 Posts; 399 Profile Views

The first year is miserable for EVERYONE:)  If you are doing it right, si much time is spent second guessing. Yes, your staffing is terrible and I'm sorry any hospital does that to their nurse but stick with it for the year ....if you can.  Make time for a class at a gym, eat clean and make sure you do something dedicated to relaxation every day.  Learning self care skills is an essential survival skill of nursing.

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LibraSunCNM has 10 years experience as a MSN and specializes in OB.

1,294 Posts; 25,290 Profile Views

You have 10-12 patients at a time per shift?  On telemetry?  

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18 Posts; 567 Profile Views

Yes, on telemetry. They get away with it by calling it a combination med-surg/telemetry floor. But my hospital has no step down units so patients are often sent to my floor from the ICU whether they need tele monitoring or not. I know I must be learning a lot but it feels like I'm just mediating the most pressing situations as opposed to learning a ton about skilled care. 

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,242 Posts; 30,626 Profile Views

That sounds absolutely miserable and scary, but as a new graduate ADN in NYC, do you realistically have better options? The problem is any place that would hire a new grad who left their first job after six months will probably be just as bad- maybe worse. You might do better to stick it out in "survival mode" and hope for greener pastures at a later time.
 

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RosesrReder has 15 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN, RN.

8,433 Posts; 26,438 Profile Views

Honestly, stay.  6 months will be here in a blink of an eye and by then you will have that year and a BSN.  Make it your short-term goal.  Much luck!

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18 Posts; 567 Profile Views

15 hours ago, Undercat said:

True- realistically I can only leave if a really good opportunity comes my way. But yes, 6 more months will be here soon enough. Thanks!

 

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18 Posts; 567 Profile Views

I may not have better opportunities elsewhere, though I can try. I won't leave unless something really good comes my way. But as others have said, 6 more months will likely be here sooner than I think and then I have a year under my belt. Thanks!

15 hours ago, Undercat said:

The first year is miserable for EVERYONE:)  If you are doing it right, si much time is spent second guessing. Yes, your staffing is terrible and I'm sorry any hospital does that to their nurse but stick with it for the year ....if you can.  Make time for a class at a gym, eat clean and make sure you do something dedicated to relaxation every day.  Learning self care skills is an essential survival skill of nursing.

True, thanks.

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12 Followers; 3,682 Posts; 27,316 Profile Views

On 11/26/2019 at 8:04 AM, RNNPICU said:

One thing to consider is that you are now with just 6 months experience and you are getting used to working as an RN.  Some of what you are experiencing is just getting used to your role, I think you definitely should wait until the 1 year mark.  It sounds like you are just now learning the realities of hospital work and it is going to take time to build a routine and become established. Again, you only have 6 months as a new RN in a hospital, there is still so much more to learn, and with each shift you work, you are learning to juggle responsibilites and become more proficient in your practice.

While the above will be true for almost any new grad anywhere, no one should be dealing with 10-12 inpatients per shift.

I agree the rest of your information may be reality (unfortunately).

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