Is it possible to get back into bedside nursing as an NP?

Updated | Posted
by amalay amalay Member

back-bedside-nurse-practitioner.jpg.223e5132b69b53f9d1a04b3758172ab3.jpg

I've been an NP for the past 7 years but I've been thinking about doing bedside nursing for the past 4 years. I keep trying and trying to change my NP jobs to see if I'll find better satisfaction, but I've come to realize that I'm just not happy with it. Unfortunately, I did a direct entry program so don't have any previous hospital experience as an RN (outside of clinicals 8 years ago). 

1) Is it possible for me to get into bedside nursing by applying to new grad programs? Or is there another way for me to make this career pivot? 

2) If I can apply to new grad programs, what do you recommend I do for my resume - do I leave off all the NP stuff somehow? Or try to word it to highlight characteristics/skills that translate over? 

chare

3,433 Posts

7 hours ago, amalay said:

[...]

1) Is it possible for me to get into bedside nursing by applying to new grad programs? Or is there another way for me to make this career pivot? 

[...]

I think it highly unlikely that you would be considered for any new graduate program.  Your only option would be to apply for open staff nurse positions.

7 hours ago, amalay said:

[...]

2) If I can apply to new grad programs, what do you recommend I do for my resume - do I leave off all the NP stuff somehow? Or try to word it to highlight characteristics/skills that translate over? 

As for you resume, If I recall correctly, I believe you posted in another thread that you have worked as an RN while you where completing the NP portion of your program.  Definitely include this information, even though it is not current.  As for your NP experience, I definitely think you need to include this as this prevents you having a gap of several years in which you haven't worked.  While it is advanced practice, it is nursing experience.  And, depending on which unit you're applying to I think  you can present this in a very favorable way.

Best wishes.

amalay

amalay

142 Posts

Thank you for your advice! I did work as an RN while in school- outpatient settings only though. I knew someone that worked as an RN in a long term care facility for years but was still accepted into a new grad program because it wasn’t in the hospital. 

HiddenAngels

HiddenAngels

Has 8 years experience. 316 Posts

Yea, I agree with the other person's post, start entry level at any facility, before you hit the floor they give you a month or two, sometimes three of training..  

I just want to see your post after you've hit the floor with us a while and then want to go back to being an NP..LOL

amalay

amalay

142 Posts

10 hours ago, HiddenAngels said:

Yea, I agree with the other person's post, start entry level at any facility, before you hit the floor they give you a month or two, sometimes three of training..  

I just want to see your post after you've hit the floor with us a while and then want to go back to being an NP..LOL

LOL thank you for the response! I was discussing this on another post, and one of my reasons for going back to bedside IS to get more experience that might help me get into acute care roles as a PNP—if that’s what I really end up wanting to do. I feel like I’ve have been an NP (outpatient) for so long that I at least know I’m not as interested in it as I thought I was when I first went to school for it. 

But, getting experience is also NOT the only reason. I’d say it’s about 10-20% of the reason why I want to give bedside a good try. Ultimately I can’t say I know enough or have experienced bedside enough to say I would or wouldn’t leave it.  It’s been a career change I’ve thought about for years, so if I ever do switch, it’s definitely not something I’m doing on a whim. 

HiddenAngels

HiddenAngels

Has 8 years experience. 316 Posts

The mere fact that you want to get the scope of what really goes on bedside and then possibly bridge into an acute care/inpatient NP tells me one thing, you’re going to be Great!

amalay

amalay

142 Posts

1 hour ago, HiddenAngels said:

The mere fact that you want to get the scope of what really goes on bedside and then possibly bridge into an acute care/inpatient NP tells me one thing, you’re going to be Great!

Thank you so so much! This means a lot to me, more than you know! 

Jeff EDRN

Jeff EDRN

Specializes in Emergency Nurse. Has 17 years experience. 3 Posts

I could get you a primary RN job working in a pediatric ED in about 2 seconds in Massachusetts. The labor market is so good for nurses you can pretty much work anywhere you want. We are mostly hiring NTP nurses so any experience is valuable.

amalay

amalay

142 Posts

12 hours ago, Jeff EDRN said:

I could get you a primary RN job working in a pediatric ED in about 2 seconds in Massachusetts. The labor market is so good for nurses you can pretty much work anywhere you want. We are mostly hiring NTP nurses so any experience is valuable.

 

Hi! Thank you so much! At the moment I’m going to try applying broadly where I am and see if that takes me anywhere. I think if push comes to shove, I wouldn’t be opposed to relocating for a short period. I just want to know, are there EVER California hospitals with this type of demand?? It feels impossible to ever get in the hospitals over here. 

Jeff EDRN

Jeff EDRN

Specializes in Emergency Nurse. Has 17 years experience. 3 Posts

It's not California but it's on the coast. There are 4 seasons (Winter can be snowy and cold) but many of my coworkers can walk to the beach and skiing is a 3 hours drive. There is currently a pedi ED (and fast track) position and several general ER. Unless you have issues with your work history you would definitely get a position. Busy ED, trauma center. Not the money they pay in California but cost of living is lower. About $35/hr for new to practice but they might count some of your NP years. Decent apartment is $900-1500, 1-2 BR. Let me know, they would expect you to say you would stay at least 1-2 years.  .  If you want me to send you more job info: jeffedrn@use.startmail.com . If you list me as a referral, I get a bonus.

Spinmass

Spinmass, ADN, BSN, RN, EMT-B

Has 6 years experience. 96 Posts

Quote
Quote
Quote

 (Winter can be snowy and cold) but many of my coworkers can walk to the beach and skiing is a 3 hours drive.

 

Jeff, are you done the cape? I'm in Northeast CT and we are basically giving away jobs through Northeast CT and Worcester. However, I just heard from a friend the other day that an ED position in the Framingham area was offering a relative new grad 57/hr.

 

amalay

amalay

142 Posts

On 3/27/2022 at 6:45 AM, Jeff EDRN said:

It's not California but it's on the coast. There are 4 seasons (Winter can be snowy and cold) but many of my coworkers can walk to the beach and skiing is a 3 hours drive. There is currently a pedi ED (and fast track) position and several general ER. Unless you have issues with your work history you would definitely get a position. Busy ED, trauma center. Not the money they pay in California but cost of living is lower. About $35/hr for new to practice but they might count some of your NP years. Decent apartment is $900-1500, 1-2 BR. Let me know, they would expect you to say you would stay at least 1-2 years.  .  If you want me to send you more job info: jeffedrn@use.startmail.com . If you list me as a referral, I get a bonus.

Thanks so so much! You and Spinmass are doing a great job with advertising the opportunities and benefits outside of CA haha