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Is LPN a good first step?

Nurses   (2,621 Views 16 Comments)
by dari98 dari98 (Member)

2,453 Visitors; 23 Posts

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currently i work as a cna in a ltc facility and i will be starting my

prerequisites to nursing in august. i was told that i should consider going for my lpn first then doing bridge program for lpn to rn. do you think this is a good idea for me to consider.

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KellNY specializes in High Risk In Patient OB/GYN.

7,433 Visitors; 710 Posts

Working as an LPN is great experience for people considering getting their RNs. it's also a lot cheaper to obtain usually.

Having said that, if you know you want to be an RN, and you can "afford" the extra time and financial investment (yes, it might be tight, stressful, and you may need loans), then I'd just go ahead into the RN program instead of delaying it even longer.

I personally think that going for LPN 1st is best for people who are not sure about wanting to be a nurse, are unable or unwilling to put in the extra time, or financially absolutely cannot swing it.

Of course, LPN as a final career choice is a viable option as well.

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761 Visitors; 26 Posts

I think thats a question only you have the answer for. I choose LPN route because I needed to see results sooner. I plan on graduate september 12 and starting at the local cc september 18 for the bridge. Good luck either way!

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 146 Articles; 187,035 Visitors; 20,756 Posts

I say go straight for the RN. I did the LPN then RN and am so very sorry now (15 years later) that I did not pursue the BSN first. It gives you many more opportunities.

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nursenpnk specializes in MSICU starting PICU.

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Don't forget that there is an associate's degree nursing program that can also be utilized. I have even seen hospitals help fund the next two years to get your BSN if you so desire. I went straight through because I didn't want to take any stops, however, if you need to decide if nursing is for sure for you or any other reasons there is always the 2 year program as well as the LPN. I want to say that the 2 year associates program may be harder to fit in the two year period as opposed to the lpn program, correct me if i am wrong. good luck whichever path you may choose :-)

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1,616 Visitors; 63 Posts

I think you should just go for the RN. I'm not speaking from personal experience, but I do know some LPN's that are in my BSN program right now, and they basically get no credit clinically or class-wise for having this experience. Most of them say they wish they would've just gone for the RN first.

Also, just for practicality, money is a lot different.

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Trophywife81 specializes in Med-Surg, gynecology.

3,184 Visitors; 88 Posts

There is no magical "right answer" to your question; you just have to examine your circumstances and choose the option that is right for you.

Is there a long waiting list for RN programs in your area? If so, I recommend an LPN program (this is what I'm doing--ADN programs in my area have about a two year waiting list). Personally, I chose to be a "lower level" (don't flame me, LPNs, I just mean a nurse with a lower level of licensure) nurse within a year rather than wait two years to even START an RN program.

Are you absolutely sure that nursing is the career you want? If not, again LPN is a good option b/c if you find that you dislike nursing, you've only spent a year in school, versus the 3-5 years it would likely require for an RN program.

Do you need to work sooner rather than later? Starting with the LPN will put you out in the workforce in about a year; then, you can be earning a decent paycheck while you take RN prerequisites, etc. If this is not an issue for you, having an RN license WILL open up many additional doors for you, so keep that in mind.

Don't be swayed by anyone who wants to state unequivically that ADN or BSN is the only way to go--they aren't living your life, you are. Just look at your circumstances and make the decision that works best for you and your family. LPNs and RNs are both nurses, and you will do fine whichever route you take. Good luck!

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Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

2 Followers; 47,443 Visitors; 28,919 Posts

It's a good route if you stick with it and go the LPN to RN immediately after getting your LPN. Otherwise I agree with Trauma above, go straight for the RN. There are mroe job opportunties and higher pay for RNs.

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1,532 Visitors; 163 Posts

I think you should just go for the RN. I'm not speaking from personal experience, but I do know some LPN's that are in my BSN program right now, and they basically get no credit clinically or class-wise for having this experience. Most of them say they wish they would've just gone for the RN first.

Also, just for practicality, money is a lot different.

That's right, you get very very little credit. I have been a nurse for 18 years and would love to go backand get my RN. But I can't afford to start over. For having such a nursing shortage--helping experienced LPN's to get become RN's seems like a great solution.......but I don't see any help available. :angryfire

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1,910 Visitors; 68 Posts

this is very interesting.. thanks for posting this!! i had this question also!

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2,329 Visitors; 92 Posts

I'm with TrophyWife. I am going to get my LPN first, and then work a few days a week while I take the Excelsior online LPN to RN bridge course. I just can not afford not to work for two years straight. Also, competition to get into local community college and state college RN programs - the cheap programs - is fierce, and it can take several years to get in AFTER you finish all of your prerequisites. For some reason, it doesn't seem quite as competitive to get into the LPN programs.

However, if I had enough money to not work for two years straight, and if I could get into an RN program right away, I would do that, because everything I've heard indicates that RNs make way more money and have more job opportunities. I'm definitely doing this to get my RN in the end.

P.S. - If you do consider the online LPN to RN program, make sure your state board of nursing accepts it. It's not acceptable in all states.

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1,337 Visitors; 29 Posts

I agree with Trophywife81. Is the same advice I can give. In my situation, I just received my LPN entrance for August yesterday and I'm so excited and a little nervous to start in August. I chose to do the LPN because is only 12 months, I can start working sooner and I can bridge to the RN while working as a LPN and is less money to go to school. Is a very intense full time program and I'm willing to give it a try while working part time as a CNA/HHA. Good luck with your decision and let us know what you decide..

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