Is this a good new grad NP offer?

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I have received multiple offers (which I'm very thankful for). I wanted to know if new grad offers between $100K-$110K base are reasonable for a specialized acute-setting (Pediatric ICU, ICU, Cardiac ICU, Pediatric Cardiac ICU, etc) in the New York/Connecticut/Boston area is reasonable? To me it seems low due to the higher cost of living, high state taxes, specialized setting etc.

My profile is 10 years PICU RN experience, 5 years CVICU experience, 7 years Transplant experience, 5+ years Charge Nurse, 4+ years Nurse Preceptor, 4.0 GPA MSN program, Honor society, multiple awards at my current hospital for preceptorship and patient advocacy (please, this is not bragging just providing my full profile since I'd like honest feedback 🙏)

I also have offers in the same range ($95K-$105K) from southern states with no taxes which is the expect range I believe but I was under the impression NE area was a higher range due to higher living expenses.  

I'd be relocating if I accept this. offer. Any guidance if this something that should be negotiated, if so, what would be a good range, or should I accept?

Thank you!

NurseBlaq

1,753 Posts

Here's a Forbe's article from 2019 listing NP salaries by state https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewdepietro/2019/11/19/nurse-practitioner-salary-state/?sh=4e73f65523cf

No one on this site knows what's best for your situation (expectations, family, cost of living, lifestyle, etc), but I would suggest choosing an area with a salary reasonable to that area. Also, be aware some areas are oversaturated with NPs and salary reflects that. There are some NPs on here from all over so maybe someone in the NE area can be more specific to the info you seek. Good luck!

ArmaniX, MSN, APRN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 9 years experience. 339 Posts

The offer seems.. low for the area but I am not certain. As a new grad > 2 years ago I was offered 90K annual for a well known hospital in the south (ICU - lots of responsibility). Another new grad offer in Maryland (~105k, ICU). 
 

After a year I moved to the west coast and now make 200k (ICU).  But much higher COL. 

Your experience, while annoyingly (kidding) superb, does not hold much weight in making you ‘worth’ a higher dollar (my opinion). I relocated for my past two jobs and it took a lot of work on my own to determine if the salary was appropriate for the area. Also consider what you will gain from that first job and how it will benefit you in potential future jobs.
 

Don’t accept dirt offers, but understand right now you are a new fish in the pond.  Also from experience it is very difficult to negotiate salary for hospital inpatient jobs. The more ‘famous/known’ a hospital the less they think they need to offer you to get you to sign. 

Neuro Guy NP, DNP, PhD, APRN

Specializes in Vascular Neurology and Neurocritical Care. Has 10 years experience. 371 Posts

Don't lump New York and Boston in the same category for pay. Boston is known for low salaries in health care across many disciplines including medicine. I'd say 115 as brand new grad in NYC is reasonable. If money is important, avoid NYC Health and Hospitals as they under pay by quite a lot because of their public status status funding issues.

I agree with someone else that your RN experience, including being charge, preceptor, etc don't matter here. It's impressive for your nursing career but contributes nothing to being an NP. I lived in Georgia previously and can say from personal experience that 105k I'm that area certainly isn't the norm especially for new grad so I wouldn't hold that salary out to be a universal starting point for the south.

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in Long term care; med-surg; critical care. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 1,904 Posts

Good luck. I'm in CT and my preceptors have indicated that the starting salary you mention is right in the range that I should expect for an acute care position. The outpatient specialty clinics will likely be a little less around here. Hope you find a position that meets all your expectations!

Babyboss 19, MSN, APRN

Specializes in in primary care pediatrics and NICU. Has 31 years experience. 34 Posts

On 12/30/2020 at 8:18 AM, ArmaniX said:

Your experience, while annoyingly (kidding) superb, does not hold much weight in making you ‘worth’ a higher dollar (my opinion). I relocated for my past two jobs and it took a lot of work on my own to determine if the salary was appropriate for the area. Also consider what you will gain from that first job and how it will benefit you in potential future jobs.

I had 25 + yrs Nursing experience prior to completing my APRN.  It carried no value in my NP interviews.  Nobody cared. (That hurts) You can't compare apples to oranges. It stinks, I know.  I was capped out as RN, in ICU.  Remember, highly paid RNs have hit their ceiling, entry level NP will have way more income potential over time.  You're just starting.  QOL is important too, keep it in mind. 

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 30 years experience. 9 Articles; 4,328 Posts

If you're willing to relocate, look at UCSF (2 Children's Hospital sites - SF and Oakland).  Your RN experience is counted towards your compensation (based on pre-agreed upon union contract). The cost of living sucks but you'll start higher than those figures (NP 1 starts at $160,000 but you'll be higher based on your RN experience).

 

HAEC_AGO_UT_ALII_VIVANT

Specializes in Pulmonary Critical Care, COVID 19 ICU, SICU, MICU. Has 12 years experience. 9 Posts

If you are happy and pleased, meaning all factors to include but not limited to: you love the job, career path, benefits, localities for fun, growth, future potential, then do it. The pay does seem quite low, especially for those areas. Remember, your happiness and job satisfaction should be of paramount importance. If you enjoy going to work every day, feel challenged, and believe this is the job that will fulfill your inner drive, I say do it!

God bless you, and I wish you greatness in your future endeavors.

myoglobin, ASN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro. Has 14 years experience. 1,453 Posts

These offers might be okay for the region, but why stay in such a high cost, high tax area for such low pay?  You could probably equal that offer here in Florida and not have income tax.  We pay $1800.00 per month for a four bedroom house with a pool in a gated community (We had a 6 bedroom, but the owner finally sold that house). You would earn close to 175K plus in California and could probably earn 140K in Washington with no income taxes. You could probably earn 120K in Nevada with no income tax.  Also, in my experience NP's get much more respect and autonomy in the West than in the East Coast. 

Neuro Guy NP, DNP, PhD, APRN

Specializes in Vascular Neurology and Neurocritical Care. Has 10 years experience. 371 Posts

On 1/3/2021 at 9:26 PM, myoglobin said:

These offers might be okay for the region, but why stay in such a high cost, high tax area for such low pay?  You could probably equal that offer here in Florida and not have income tax.  We pay $1800.00 per month for a four bedroom house with a pool in a gated community (We had a 6 bedroom, but the owner finally sold that house). You would earn close to 175K plus in California and could probably earn 140K in Washington with no income taxes. You could probably earn 120K in Nevada with no income tax.  Also, in my experience NP's get much more respect and autonomy in the West than in the East Coast. 

California is a restrictive practice state and taxes and prices are just as outrageous (if not more) as the Northeast, so no benefit there over here. And I lived in Georgia so I'm surprised to hear that salaries in Florida are competitive with the North. I have colleagues in Florida and we've swapped numbers, and their offers aren't competitive with mine. I could be wrong about other areas, but if they were competitive with the North at the time I lived there ten years ago I wouldn't have come North. I can't speak on Washington or Nevada.

I will say that Maryland and Delaware don't have salaries that are that great.

Edited by Neuro Guy NP

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care. Has 4 years experience. 2 Articles; 1,394 Posts

On 1/7/2021 at 6:10 AM, Neuro Guy NP said:

California is a restrictive practice state and taxes and prices are just as outrageous (if not more) as the Northeast, so no benefit there over here.

California NPs are the highest paid in the country.  An FNP with a few years' experience can make $150K per year, specialty NPs can make up to $200K per year.  Cost of living varies widely within the state and much of California is quite affordable.  I just moved to Bakersfield and bought a beautiful 4 BR, 3 BA house, 2600 sq feet on 0.25 acre for $399K.  There are plenty of nice, smaller homes here for $200 to $250K.

Alicia777, MSN, NP

Specializes in Surgery. 310 Posts

Agree with others this seems low. I’m in Boston too but graduated 7 years ago. 
Given your experience 115-118K sounds more appropriate. Ask! You never know until you try and negotiate. 
What were you making as an RN? I bet more. You could at least ask them to match that.