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Is Giving 2 Weeks Notice Ancient Practice?

Nurses   (5,228 Views 33 Comments)
by staple1027 staple1027 (Member)

462 Visitors; 25 Posts

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There are just some jobs that do not work out. If I've been at a job a decent amount of time and plan on including it on my resume, I give two weeks. A couple times in my career I walked into a frying pan, and left within the first week. Shat happens. No notice. A couple of other times I gave 2 weeks only to then be fired on the spot. One job was so miserable, I reported off to the supervisor, left mid shift, then wrote a scathing resignation effective immediatley. I have seen employers in and out of healthcare fire people during their 2 weeks notice, and am wondering if 2 weeks notice has gone out of style like the curly cord wall phone? Of course this all depends if you have a PTO balance that needs to be used or paid, or any other benes in the pot. I have heard that nurses giving 2 weeks are then terminated immediately, and this is becoming more the norm than the anomoly. I think that we can all agree, the 30 year career at one job, then retiring has all but vanished, and now its common game to have a dozen or more jobs, and 1, 2 or even 3 different careers. After 20 years in this field, I have also learned that an employer will never hesitate to abuse the heck out of nurses with unsafe staffing, so long as the nurse allows him or herself to be abused. Any thoughts?

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AnnieOaklyRN works as a RN, Paramedic.

1 Follower; 33,746 Visitors; 2,577 Posts

I have only had three nursing jobs in 11 years, and have given two weeks notice to the first one (I still work at the second two). I was per-diem at the first one and gave them three weeks, since the schedule was out that far. I always attempt to give at least two weeks and I would put that in a letter of resignation just to have proof of that, in case I got a bad reference etc.

You don't want to burn bridges. If it is a job you were only at for a few weeks, and you are still on orientation it might be ok to leave sooner. Just remember not to burn bridges and that the hospital you are leaving may own the one you want to work at in the future!

Annie

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a school nurse.

11,079 Visitors; 1,116 Posts

It's an interesting paradox, as more and more employers are "requiring" 4 wks/a month's notice. That doesn't square with letting people go early after they give notice, but maybe in those cases there are stories behind the story...

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

3 Followers; 112,757 Visitors; 13,045 Posts

I have never personally seen a situation where a nurse gave 2 weeks' notice and then was immediately fired. The only time I would terminate the 2 weeks early is if the nurse were on orientation, then it just doesn't make sense for her to continue to orient to a position she is not keeping. I certainly expect every person quitting to give 2 weeks' notice. 4 is even better, but I won't hold anyone to that.

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462 Visitors; 25 Posts

I have never personally seen a situation where a nurse gave 2 weeks' notice and then was immediately fired. The only time I would terminate the 2 weeks early is if the nurse were on orientation, then it just doesn't make sense for her to continue to orient to a position she is not keeping. I certainly expect every person quitting to give 2 weeks' notice. 4 is even better, but I won't hold anyone to that.

Sadly, its hapenned a whole lot around here, where the market is over saturated and nurses are a dime a dozen, regularly abused, and often sent packing when a cheaper new grad enters the picture.

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Pixie.RN has 18 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and works as a ED/Trauma, Educator, IP/Nurse Epidemiologist.

7 Followers; 32 Articles; 126,093 Visitors; 12,898 Posts

I was required to give two weeks, I gave three. Only management has to give four weeks where I am, which makes sense. I am not management, but not bedside either as an educator, so I felt good about three weeks.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

3 Followers; 112,757 Visitors; 13,045 Posts

Sadly, its hapenned a whole lot around here, where the market is over saturated and nurses are a dime a dozen, regularly abused, and often sent packing when a cheaper new grad enters the picture.

I don't understand - sent packing? If they've already given their intent to quit, and the department has enough staff, then I guess I don't see anything wrong with the practice. If they don't need them those last two weeks, why have a person stay who is obviously unhappy with their current job? I've just never been in a situation where we didn't need that outgoing nurse to work her final shifts.

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6,338 Visitors; 525 Posts

I believe in giving notice according to policy , usually the standard is two weeks. If the person was on orientation, then they usually don't continue with orientation. Other times , if a person falls sick and is unable to come to work at full capacity in a timely manner for the hospital , they will be forced to resign or be fired.

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2 Followers; 102,882 Visitors; 14,620 Posts

Usually when people are let go as soon as they resign, and are told they don't have to work their notice, it's because the employer is happy to get rid of them (I'm not referring to people who resign while still on orientation; I mean if they have been there for some time).

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psu_213 has 6 years experience.

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The only time I would terminate the 2 weeks early is if the nurse were on orientation

This is the only situation that I have seen one of my employers terminate a nurse before he/she worked out his 2 weeks.

To the OP, sorry that you work in a area that holds nurses in such poor regards.

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psu_213 has 6 years experience.

27,467 Visitors; 3,869 Posts

Usually when people are let go as soon as they resign, and are told they don't have to work their notice, it's because the employer is happy to get rid of them

Regarding having never seen anyone let go without working there 2 weeks: I did see, once, where someone called off their first 2 shifts while on their 2 week notice. That person was let go immediately. In that case, it is better to fill the staffing hole for next week rather than having to scramble 1 hour (or less) before the shift.

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Buckeye.nurse has 13 years experience.

3,723 Visitors; 295 Posts

I don't think that the 2 week notice has gone out of practice at all. Like a few previous posters, I've only left a handful of jobs (I've resigned a total of 2 times in my career). The first was my CNA job at a nursing home. They knew, months before my graduation, that I was leaving to work at a hospital as an RN when I passed boards. There were no issues, and I continued to work there until the week before I started my job as an RN.

I gave a 4 week resignation the second time because I was a charge nurse. Again, there were no issues, and I continued to work (and train a new charge nurse) until I moved out of state.

Giving notice always makes you look better, and nursing is a small world. As Annie said, don't burn bridges!

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