OMG--is US$32 per hour as starting too good to be true or really true in Los Angeles? - page 3

is US$32 per hour as starting for RN too good to be true or really true in Los Angeles?... Read More

  1. by   suzanne4
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Will experience also play an important factor when being considered for hiring except towards extra pay? I just can't tie it up.
    Sometimes, depending on the area of experience, for you, it should help with your area.............with med/surg definitely not.
  2. by   mark3274
    Quote from tridil2000
    i am always surprised that nurses get all excited over $32 an hour! hello!!! you're worth MORE!!!! who are you comparing yourselves to to think that's good money?... cashiers? lab techs?? unit clerks??

    compare yourselves to physicians, speech therapists, cpas, lawyers, business leaders, teachers, and all educated professionals. you'll soon see $32 per hour is cheap. if we could bill per procedure etc, we'd be paid more in the range of $50 - $75 an hour.... our true worth and proportionate to what we do for our patients!

    (back to the bsn min req to support my opinion... but that's another old beaten thread)
    How true its rather sad that as a new grads we have to look at 20.50 as a starting wage...
    20.50 in todays world is really sad.

    They wonder why more males are not going into nursing with the wages lowlike this to start thats a big part of it.
    The first semester in nursing also scares many male students away...
    they are wearing what? and you want me to change them I've seen male students leave just because of that.
  3. by   suzanne4
    You need to take into account the cost of living in an area, and what the tax rate is.

    San Francisco area pays in the $40s per hour as a starting rate, but the cost of an apt is extremely high and the taxes are quite high; so someone may actually come out ahead with their take home pay by living someplace where apts are not close to $2000 per month and more and the taxes do not take such a big bite of your pay.

    This thread is also more than 15 months old as well so the rates have increased as well.
  4. by   jonRNMD
    starting salary in our hospital is $31.50/hr but will increase to $33/hr next month and will increase again to $35/hr by mid year 2008 BUT the cost of living here in NY is so high that car payments, rent,food and utilities gobbles up 65% of my net salary. dont forget that I also have to pay City tax aside from Federal and State taxes. good thing my wife is working in the same hospital so we get to save on gasoline

    next year would be a different situation though :uhoh21:
    Last edit by jonRNMD on Dec 21, '07
  5. by   suzanne4
    Thanks for sharing this, my point exactly. Where there are higher salaries, there are usually higher costs associated with living there as well. And we do see this in the US.

    And Happy Holidays to you.
  6. by   jonRNMD
    Quote from suzanne4
    Thanks for sharing this, my point exactly. Where there are higher salaries, there are usually higher costs associated with living there as well. And we do see this in the US.

    And Happy Holidays to you.
    HAPPY HOLIDAYS to YOU too
  7. by   chocokitten
    to OP-
    I would not be surprised. COL is HIGH in Cali.
    Quote from tridil2000
    i am always surprised that nurses get all excited over $32 an hour! hello!!! you're worth MORE!!!! who are you comparing yourselves to to think that's good money?... cashiers? lab techs?? unit clerks??

    compare yourselves to physicians, speech therapists, cpas, lawyers, business leaders, teachers, and all educated professionals. you'll soon see $32 per hour is cheap. if we could bill per procedure etc, we'd be paid more in the range of $50 - $75 an hour.... our true worth and proportionate to what we do for our patients!

    (back to the bsn min req to support my opinion... but that's another old beaten thread)
    ditto. It pisses me off that my husband could make $80k/yr in tech support with no college degree and I make $50k/yr with 5 years experience AND I keep people ALIVE :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
  8. by   Ventjock
    [QUOTE=chocokitten;2606372]to OP-
    I would not be surprised. COL is HIGH in Cali.

    ditto. It pisses me off that my husband could make $80k/yr in tech support with no college degree and I make $50k/yr with 5 years experience AND I keep people ALIVE :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire[/QUOTE]

    my friend is 24 and only completed around 20 college credit hrs. he dropped out and got a job as an apprentice iron worker. this past year as a journeyman ironworker he made over $80K.
  9. by   labrador4122
    Quote from nurse2be2008
    It's probably true since California is one of the states with the highest nursing salaries. I hear that it's because the cost of living up there is pretty high.
    we have a very high cost of living here in miami, and we still do not get paid enough!

    for a new grad. $22.53/hr for day shift
    an apartment to rent cost over $800 + fees for a 1/1
  10. by   TAB_RN
    Quote from IampattyRN
    we have a very high cost of living here in miami, and we still do not get paid enough!

    for a new grad. $22.53/hr for day shift
    an apartment to rent cost over $800 + fees for a 1/1
    I paid $750.00/mo for rent in Massachusetts in 1988 before I moved to South Florida (which I lived for 8 years). That price didn't even include my electric. The cost of living in Massachusetts (Boston) is probably double what you are paying, for a studio apt., so as you can see, the cost of living may be high to you, but that is probably because you are comparing it to your pay. But I believe it is all relative. High cost, higher pay. I now again live in Massachusetts. The cost of living is still ridiculous here, but I do love living here.
  11. by   rn4ever?
    If it were true, I wouldn't be surprised.....given the high cost of living in CA. If you convert $32 to Philippine Peso that would be around P1280 an hour right now...but sadly you are also spending in US dollars, and whatever you earn is most likely calibrated to the cost of living in the area where you live in the US.
  12. by   traumahawk99
    if you're going to work day shift three days a week, you'll probably make in the
    40's. if you go to nights, then it's pretty wide open. i've been a nurse for 2 years, and my best paycheck for 2 weeks was over $8,300, for working 13 out of 14 nights in a row (7p to 7a).

    so in short order, if you work nights and work 72 to 84 hours a week, you can indeed make quite a bit. and i think you can do that in most large metropolitan areas. the question becomes whether you'll live long enought to enjoy it .

    i can't see myself doing this for more than another couple of years. i'm really thinking of working hard for 6 months of the year and taking the next 6 months off.
    how many careers can you do that with, plus get to travel?

    despite all the complaining that goes on in nursing, this really isn't so bad .
  13. by   Daly City RN
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    I know this thread was begun quite sometime ago, but I can tell you that in our large acute care hospital here in San Francisco, Calif., RN's starting salary in 2008 is around $40/hr. for those RN's with no experience. It goes much higher for experienced RN's.

    After six months of probationary period, an RN can work as many OT hours as he/she wants.

    At the top tier of our hospital's staff RN pay level, assuming you work the 7pm-7am shift you can earn as much as $67/hr. that includes the 20% night shift differential. (There are even higher RN salaries in some of the SF hospitals I heard about.)

    RN's in our hospital get paid double-time-and-a-half when working on a legal paid holiday. That is a little over $1,000 for ONE 12-hour night shift work for some RN's with enough seniority. Don't believe this? Google RN salaries in the SF Bay Area's acute care hospitals.

    Benefits for RN's is great. Health insurance programs cost from zero to a few dollars per pay period. There is visual and dental insurance as well. Add paid vacation time off (number of days depending on the length of service), paid holiday off, paid educational leave, paid floating holiday, paid longevity day off, generous sick leave, etc.

    Sure the job is hard and very stressful, but the recently implemented state of California mandated staffing ratio of 1 nurse to a maximum of 5 patients in Med-Surg, units has made the life of nurses that much better.

    The cost of living here in California is astronomical compared to other regions of the country and the rest of the globe for that matter. If you are an RN in an acute care hospital in any major city in California you can lead a comfortable life, and possibly even better than the typical middle class American family.

    Thankfully nurses in major California cities are now better compensated for all the hard work we do. Is the pay high enough now to ease the nursing shortage? Only time can tell.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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