No Nursing Positions - page 2

Staffs full, nurses struggle for work Recession hits a once-sure thing I hear everyday that many nurses have lost their jobs, it hasn't been this bad in a very long time. So much for nursing... Read More

  1. by   Falkner
    In a related note I have a question concerning Nursing school in Cincinnati Ohio. I left NKU's program years ago and I am considerin taking again. My neighbor informs me the she is taking a LPN/RN program through Hondros in Cincy and it is from like 2 to 11pm daily. I called the school for more info and nothing exists. Is anyone aware of such a long program in Cincinnati Ohio?
  2. by   Ginger's Mom
    The evening PN program is from 3-9 one evening class, and 3-10 two evenings leaving other classes to the other two days. This is a two year program.
  3. by   Ginger's Mom
    Redranger could you post your nursing qualifications to all of us. It seems like you have many opinions but not much fact to back up your claims.

    More importantly how can you evaluate nursing education ? Are you a RN ? Or are you an educator? Or have you been a long term patient in both the American system and the Philippine system ?

    It seems to me from my trained observation you only know one nurse ( your wife of a few months). I have been married for over 30 years, my husband met me in my Junior year of nursing school and I don't think he would feel qualified speaking about nursing education in the US or any other country. It seems like he has had plenty of exposure to nurses, phone calls from work, social occasions, talking to students who call my house not to mention talking care of elderly sick parents. Yet he does not voice any opinions on nursing or nursing education since he does not feel qualified.

    And he certainly would not lecture experienced nurses on nursing practice or nursing education. I guess he respects nurses and the nursing profession.
  4. by   Kosmonavt
    In my opinion, it's crazy to pay $100,000 for BSN. She could get for $10,000 in California.
  5. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from valerie salva
    when i see graphs and read the stats about the age of the average nurse, and the number of nurses declining due to retirement- i wonder- are the people who compile these numbers taking into consideration the huge increases in nursing students, nursing school capacities, new nursing programs, and the surge of new graduates?

    it doesn't appear that they are. therefore, the stats could be waaaaay off.

    yes, the 2004 survey of rn's took into consideration age of students:

    age

    the aging of the rn workforce in the united states has continued. as of 2004, the average age of the total rn population (including those who are retired and not employed in nursing) was estimated to be 46.8 years. this is the highest average age since the inception of the survey, more than 1 year older than the average age estimated in 2000 (45.2 years) and more than 2 years older than the average age estimate in 1996 (44.3 years).
    the aging rn workforce reflects fewer young nurses entering the rn population, large cohorts of the rn population moving into their 50s and 60s, and older graduates from initial nursing education programs entering the rn population. in 2004, only 8.0 percent of the rn population was under the age of 30, a decrease from 9.0 percent in 2000 and 25.1 percent in 1980. at the same time, in 2004, 41.1 percent of rns were 50 years of age or older, a dramatic increase from 33.0 percent in 2000 and 25.1 percent in 1980 (see appendix a, table 1). the increase in the number of older nurses who returned to the workforce in response to the higher salaries and reported shortages may have contributed to the trend.

    the average age of rns at graduation from initial nursing education also varied by type of program. graduates of diploma and associate degree programs in 2000 or later were the same age (31.8 years) and were older than graduates of bachelor’s degree or higher programs (26.3 years) during this time period. in other graduation years, graduates of associate degree programs were older than all other graduates. across survey years, the age of diploma graduates has steadily been increasing across graduation cohorts. baccalaureate degree recipients graduating after 1989 were the youngest (see chart 10). however, the average age at graduation is lower since 2000 among recent graduates of associate degree and bachelor’s degree programs (declining by 1.5 years and 1.2 years respectively, compared to those who graduated during the 1990s (see appendix a, table 2).
  6. by   pinkroyalty18
    after months of hibernation,i have to speak up....

    seriously,why is is that the same people here are talking about the same thing over and over against Philippines? dont you ever get tired with your "usual speech"? just wondrin... Is there something new that u can talk about PI aside from "substandard education,low NLE and NCLEX passing rates,incompetent nurses,blah blah blah".. It has been months like that since I last visited and it came no surprise at all to read the same comments from the very same people...

    And by the way Alex49,we DO NOT BUY our maids.they get paid every month and they are treated with respect. Here in our house,they got to eat the same thing we eat and we never thought of them as our property. They can leave anytime they want..We even encourage them to go to school..so there,hope that's clear. THEY ARE NOT FOR SALE... you should be careful with your words. they are not slaves for sale.
    Last edit by pinkroyalty18 on Apr 19, '09
  7. by   redranger
    Quote from Nurse!Nurse!Hello?
    I certainly hope you are joking, redranger! If not, you are very out-of-touch with the mindset of the American public. I don't know a single 22-year-old Bostonian who would ever even consider moving to a Third World country to attend nursing school. The proliferation of sub-standard nursing schools and subsequent high failure rate for students taking both the NLE and NCLEX speaks volumes about the current problems in nursing education in the Philippines. For you to continue to assert that the PI is "best" in training quality nurses is just plain silly.
    Funny How Hospitals in USA have Philippine Nurses working there, It says something for their education system and work ethics.

    I have read on this board about Nursing Programs in USA where people say in their Clinicals they clean bed pans or bath patients, Now that is crazy.
  8. by   redranger
    Quote from Nurse!Nurse!Hello?
    I would hazard to say that there are very few Americans who consider the Philippines to be anything like "the 51st state." Most Americans probably can't even find the Philippines on a map! There are also plenty of other countries with citizens fluent in English. And if the Philippines is hanging onto the values and culture of the 1950's...they sure have a lot of catching up to do!
    Catching Up. USA/Canada/England and other Western Cultures are the minority not majority as far as World Population. Don't assume just because it's the way or custom where you live it's the same around the world:spin:

    USA granted Philippines Independence after WW2, and they could of easily been another state just like Hawaii. Check out Bataan Death March and you will see how much US and Philippines Troops suffered during WW 2.

    I for one couldn't find Philippines on the map a couple of years ago, I took a trip over there to see a house my cousin had built, and I had little to no knowlege of PI.

    If you talk to any older people men who served in the Military in your area, You will find they know a lot of PI. More than likely they fought or trained over there. My Neighbor trained in PI for the Korean War.
  9. by   redranger
    Quote from pinkroyalty18
    after months of hibernation,i have to speak up....

    seriously,why is is that the same people here are talking about the same thing over and over against Philippines? dont you ever get tired with your "usual speech"? just wondrin... Is there something new that u can talk about PI aside from "substandard education,low NLE and NCLEX passing rates,incompetent nurses,blah blah blah".. It has been months like that since I last visited and it came no surprise at all to read the same comments from the very same people...
    I think more Philippines would speak up, but it's not their nature or culture to argue or disagree in public places or forums.

    Maybe we should discuss why so many U.S. Trained Nurses quit or can't handle working in USA, and to me the blame should go on the Education System that is followed in US.

    In my opinion, they don't train or prepare US Nurse for real life and working conditions they will be working in.

    Philippines Nurses are trained to work in conditions they drive away US nurses in USA.
  10. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from redranger
    I have read on this board about Nursing Programs in USA where people say in their Clinicals they clean bed pans or bath patients, Now that is crazy.

    Why is that crazy?
  11. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from redranger
    I think more Philippines would speak up, but it's not their nature or culture to argue or disagree in public places or forums.

    Maybe we should discuss why so many U.S. Trained Nurses quit or can't handle working in USA, and to me the blame should go on the Education System that is followed in US.

    In my opinion, they don't train or prepare US Nurse for real life and working conditions they will be working in.

    Philippines Nurses are trained to work in conditions they drive away US nurses in USA.
    US nurses leave the profession because of how they are treated. Not because in your opinion they are not prepared for 'real life.' I know I wanted to work in the US but it used to frighten me on how easy it is to fire someone and the lack of support in most cases there are for nurses. In some states the ratio of nurse to patient is bad and to work in a nursing home and be responsible for over 30 patients is hard. How can you dispense medication to patients in the time window allowed is beyond me with no allowance to emergencies and I think is more open to errors.

    I feel, reading the Philippine forum, that for some there are some schools that are just there for the money and do not provide proper training and clinical experience, this is what I am reading. We read facts that less than 50% pass the local exam, schools that fare bad like this should be looked at and standards need to be improved. The Philippine nurses many years ago had a good if not excellent reputation unfortunately we are seeing more complaints against them especially in the press which is bringing it down for the Philippine nurses that are excellent and caring now.
  12. by   redranger
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    Why is that crazy?
    Cuz, That is the bulk of their training........
  13. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from redranger
    Cuz, That is the bulk of their training........
    Then I suggest you ask this question in the student nurse forum and see what they have to say regarding their training. I am not seeing this

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