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In Need of Some Advice Please

Nurses   (1,797 Views | 23 Replies)

urijahsmommy has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nurse, Med-surg/Tele.

1,588 Profile Views; 53 Posts

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myoglobin has 12 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro.

728 Posts; 5,040 Profile Views

You might even think about going back for your NP. That is because Hawaii is an IP state and you could probably do well with a clinic on the North Shore. This is especially the case if you offer "evening hours" and some weekends.  Obviously, this is a "long term" plan, but it allows you to have time with your son now and plan for the future without the gloom of "worrying about not getting experience now".  

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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I was a nurse for 20 years (psych and corrections) before I decided to work med-surg.  I was practically hired off the street by the hospital of my choice and was given a great orientation.  I'm sure a certain amount of luck was involved, but the point is you don't need to make any decisions under duress.

When looking back ten or twenty years from now will you be happy having missed your son's childhood for the skills and the money?  Or will you be happier having been there for your son when he needed you the most?

I believe that if you're a conscientious nurse in whatever job you have, your career will come out just fine.  I can't give you the same assurance about your child, especially if you start being mostly absent from his life, and much more stressed and tired when you're present.

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165 Posts; 1,553 Profile Views

I like to read people's pros and cons for decision making. Usually the one they want the most shines through with more positive pros and less negative cons and vice versa. I think you know what you prefer. If you do stay at the school, I would definitely see if you can do per diem or something at the hospital to keep your foot in the door, get extra cash in the summer off, etc. Who knows, maybe you'll find that you do enjoy it more and can switch to full time. Benefits are super important to someone with my needed prescriptions so that's usually on my big positive pros list. Good luck! 

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TAKOO01 has 3 years experience as a BSN.

155 Posts; 2,969 Profile Views

I believe that if you're a conscientious nurse in whatever job you have, your career will come out just fine

 

This comment is very zen and i love it. May it be true for all of us!

Im always worried in the back of my mind about the "losing skills" possibility. I want to start feeling secure in your statement. Gotta just believe, i guess.

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1 Follower; 963 Posts; 6,788 Profile Views

If you can move to where the hospital is, then take the med surg job. I don't think you will last if you are doing med surg and having to deal with that long drive, basically if you take the job and not move closer to it, you are setting yourself up for failure, before you even get started.

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57 Posts; 1,446 Profile Views

I would take the med-surg position for right now.

You could also make a temporary sacrifice and volunteer to work more weekends or nights and hopefully you’d hit less traffic.

You mention needing to find childcare at 5:30am but could you drop your child off with family that morning or have she/he get picked up by family?

Move closer possibly?

Go part time after the orientation?

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421 Posts; 2,017 Profile Views

I understand rush hour but would you hit a lot of traffic with the hours for 12 hour shifts?  Most people don't have to be at work at 0700, nor do they leave at 1930.  I would check this out in person before making my decision.

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myoglobin has 12 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro.

728 Posts; 5,040 Profile Views

You are talking about Oahu folks the traffic is nearly always bad. Also, housing costs near Honolulu are very high gas is very expensive as well. Plus, none of it will make up for lost time with your kid. 

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FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

3 Followers; 1,710 Posts; 15,123 Profile Views

The whole idea that you lose skills unless you work in acute care is just baloney.

You have a different skill set than an acute care nurse. 

If you need to switch for the money or benefits, well okay. 

But if you leave a job you love because of this bogus idea that you'll get more skills from working in a hospital that would be a mistake. Hospitals are frequently toxic work environments. Mass respect to anyone who works in one. 

Don't fall for this nonsense about "skills".

 

 

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urijahsmommy has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nurse, Med-surg/Tele.

53 Posts; 1,588 Profile Views

@myoglobin are you from Oahu?  Everything you said is absolutely true!  Unless you live on Oahu or have been here longer than a 2 week vacay, It's hard for anyone to understand just how bad traffic is on this island.  You also mentioned the cost of living...I rent an itty bitty 2 bedroom apartment ~24 miles from downtown and pay $1600/mo.  If I moved closer to downtown I'd expect to pay over well over $2000 for a 2 bedroom place.  Again something I don't expect anyone to understand unless they are from here or have lived here before.  

@hardworkpaysoff I never thought to work part time after orientation.  I assumed that orientation would be a full time commitment in which the hospital would require me maintain even after the program.  This is something I should definitely look into.  I could probably pay a family member to watch my son at 530am if its only for 12 weeks.  Anything longer than that I would be asking for too much.  I don't know too many people that like waking up that early lol.  

Thank you everyone else for your input!  Please keep them coming!

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KCMnurse has 36 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in Educator.

1 Article; 281 Posts; 7,741 Profile Views

what about a PRN position in LTC, dialysis or something similar to 'keep your skills up'. Do not however underestimate the skills you have and are still developing in your current position. Critical thinking is crucial when you are the only clinician on site and having to make appropriate decisions. I wish you the very best!

 

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urijahsmommy has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nurse, Med-surg/Tele.

53 Posts; 1,588 Profile Views

Hi all!  Just wanted to give an update!  So...I decided to take the med-surg/tele new grad position. I have completed my twelve weeks of precepting and have been on my own for 2 months now.  Although I have learned so much in the past six months and have been told that I’m doing a great job, have made the decision to resign. I have realized that bedside nursing in a hospital is NOT for me. The hours are long, the days are stressful, my family is having a hard time adjusting, and most importantly I have lost that joy of going to work. I have been told countless times that the first year is rough and that it will get better. I have been told many times by coworkers and patients and their families that I am a great nurse and that it reflects in the care are I provide but I am not feeling that sense of happiness I felt when I worked with kids at a school. Yes the pay is better at the hospital, and yes the benefits are better, but all of that is not worth my happiness and most importantly my family’s happiness. I have learned that bedside nursing is not for everyone and I give you all major props for doing what you do. 

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