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If your teacher says you should go home, you're probably ok to stay

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nursex23 has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

1,312 Profile Views; 65 Posts

I had a teacher bring a student down to my office. Teacher says "she was in here earlier but I think it's time to go home." Student had been in earlier with cramps and we called home to bring her ibuprofen but dad said it would be about an hour. Now she's crying. Teacher keeps repeating that she should go home. I asked the student if it's still cramps that have gotten worse or is this something new. Student said it was just the cramps. Again, teacher says she should go home. I told the student in front of the teacher that she can be in school if it's just cramps but I asked the student what she wanted to do, call dad and see where he is with pain medicine or see if he can pick you up? The student said the medication always works for her so she wants to wait for the medication. Called dad who said he was outside parking the car. Teacher had nothing to say after that. 🤔

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tining has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nurse.

1 Follower; 877 Posts; 13,809 Profile Views

Drop mike!

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k1p1ssk has 9 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in pediatrics.

345 Posts; 4,645 Profile Views

Why couldn't the teacher just leave her with you and butt the heck out of it????? Jeez...

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nursex23 has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

65 Posts; 1,312 Profile Views

4 minutes ago, k1p1ssk said:

Why couldn't the teacher just leave her with you and butt the heck out of it????? Jeez...

I'm actually a little happy about it. Hopefully she spreads the word - the new school nurse is taking care of business. 

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

3 Followers; 2,657 Posts; 10,875 Profile Views

High five, Nursex23.

I wonder if the teacher wasn't being overly sympathetic. I had drop-to-the-floor bad cramps as a teen (and this was before Ibuprofen so I am before Ibuprofen old). I am a little more sympathetic on occasion.

However - why would that teacher want to send a message that we stop everything when we menstruate?

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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2 minutes ago, ruby_jane said:

High five, Nursex23.

I wonder if the teacher wasn't being overly sympathetic. I had drop-to-the-floor bad cramps as a teen (and this was before Ibuprofen so I am before Ibuprofen old). I am a little more sympathetic on occasion.

However - why would that teacher want to send a message that we stop everything when we menstruate?

Because the teacher didn't want the girl doubled over and crying in class.    The girl should have been allowed to wait in the nurse's office until the Dad arrived with the medication.   Or, if severe cramps are a regular problem for this girl, she should be able to bring the med to school with her, or keep it in the RN office, or whatever the policy is for students who need to take meds regularly.

When I was young, I suffered from terrible cramps -- some of which were totally overwhelming.   I wasn't able to do anything during those times.   If she is really suffering, she shouldn't have to sit in class.

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nursex23 has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

65 Posts; 1,312 Profile Views

1 minute ago, llg said:

If she is really suffering, she shouldn't have to sit in class.

I agree. I offered but she said she was ok to go back until dad brought meds. 🤷‍♀️

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tining has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nurse.

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Offer heating pad for 10 minutes.

Personally I would not have kept in office if med was going to be a while.  Student is missing instruction time, a big non-no in middle and high school.  

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CanIcallmymom has 4 years experience.

302 Posts; 980 Profile Views

19 minutes ago, tining said:

Offer heating pad for 10 minutes.

Personally I would not have kept in office if med was going to be a while.  Student is missing instruction time, a big non-no in middle and high school.  

This is how I would have handled it as well. Especially if the kiddo is insistent that she can go back to class to wait, as in this case. An hour of missed instruction in our high school is almost 1.5 class periods. That is a lot of missed instruction.

If they are in too much pain to go back to class to wait for the med, then they just need to be picked up.

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tining has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nurse.

1 Follower; 877 Posts; 13,809 Profile Views

Ditto

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1 Follower; 295 Posts; 1,153 Profile Views

Any student that says they are good to go back to class is more than welcome to do that!!! Unless they have an excludable condition...

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JenTheSchoolRN is a BSN, RN and specializes in School nursing.

2,594 Posts; 24,080 Profile Views

This is why I have the long heating packs. They cover the length of the abdomen and are great for menstrual cramps. 

(MacGill has them: https://www.macgill.com/economy-reusable-hot-cold-gel-pack-5-x-11-24-case.html)

But I also have the perk of OTC orders that include ibuprofen and acetaminophen - great to have for cramps. But if I did not have these orders, If student were in so much pain that they could not stay in class, I'd dismiss (have a few students in that category). If not, I'd sent them back with heating pack and call them back when Dad arrived with meds. Then I'd look into order from student's doctor and for Dad to provide ibuprofen so this isn't a future issue. 

I've also encouraged parents to have a discussion with their child's doctor if cramps are very severe and affecting their child's ability to learn/function on a regular basis. Because they don't always have to. 

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