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I do not want to go back

Specializes in med-surg.

Hello all I just feel like sharing some thoughts with people who understand. i am a new nurse who graduated in May and worked as a RN for three months my first nursing job did not work out. However, this is not what this post is about.

I have been out of work for 2 months and will be beginning a new job at another hospital in December. And the truth is...I do not want to go back!!! I have seen what it is like to be a professional nurse in the real world and am not interested at all.But I have a degree,loans to pay back and need to make a livlihood for myself so I will be going back to nursing.

Since I have been off I have seen how others my age live. They are happier, have less responsibility. I feel the responsibilty of nursing and the stress has aged me beyond my years. I just do not want to go back to this profession. I have no desire. I have come to the conclusion that I need to give it a year and if I still feel this way I will pursue other options.Just felt like sharing.Thanks for listening

Pay off your debt and sock money away in savings while you gain more experience on the job and explore other options. After a year your viewpoint might change about nursing. You might have decided upon another path and even started taking courses to follow that path. Whatever you do, keep in mind that if you keep your nursing license active by taking any required CEUs and paying the fee, you will always have a backup employment option should life throw you another whopper. Do what is best for you and enjoy yourself. Good luck.

07302003, ASN, RN

Specializes in Tele, Med-Surg, MICU.

Yeah, the first year sucks, hospital nursing can be awful at times.

I chose nursing as a second degree. Maybe because I spent 15 years in the non-nursing workforce, know how awful the economy is now, I think nursing is a good choice and work through all the crud I put up with.

Other jobs have downfalls too. Are you in your early 20's? Have you worked at anything besides nursing? Is this more about being out in the workforce (which can be hard, period) or about your career choice?

Think about where you want to be in 5 years and what it will take to get there. There are a lot of opportunities in nursing but you may need to "do your time" to get to where you want to be.

Best of luck.

1styearsucks

Specializes in med-surg.

Yeah, the first year sucks, hospital nursing can be awful at times.

I chose nursing as a second degree. Maybe because I spent 15 years in the non-nursing workforce, know how awful the economy is now, I think nursing is a good choice and work through all the crud I put up with.

Other jobs have downfalls too. Are you in your early 20's? Have you worked at anything besides nursing? Is this more about being out in the workforce (which can be hard, period) or about your career choice?

Think about where you want to be in 5 years and what it will take to get there. There are a lot of opportunities in nursing but you may need to "do your time" to get to where you want to be.

Best of luck.

Yes I am in my early twenties. i am 23. And the other jobs I have had were simple jobs like a cashier at a grocery store.So it may be just getting used to all of the administration and politics that goes with having a job. As I think about it that is the part I hate the most. It is not interacting with the patients.

Well, you have a little taste of nursing in an acute care setting. I've been a nurse in that setting for more than 12 years now and, quite frankly, I think I began to find a comfort level in the last 6 or so (years, that is). Fortunately, nurses aren't all relegated to work in hospitals...so, please reconsider throwing in the towel and try other settings...home care, long term care, primary care, camp nursing, and the list goes on and on. Take Care and Good Luck!

PiPhi2004

Specializes in Trauma ICU, Surgical ICU, Medical ICU.

I think most people dread working those first few months as an RN. I have just gotten through my 'hell year'. I spent most of that year guzzling the pepto bismol because the thought of going to work made me sick. It is really hard being so young (I am 23 now as well) and doing such a rough job when you see all your college buddies seeming to live it up. I felt all these emotions when I started and there were days I wanted to turn that car around and never go back.

I also do know how it feels to accomplish that first year and to have it all 'click' in your brain after a year or so. You will also have so many more options if you just stick it out for a year. Also, the bills gotta be paid. If it seems to be the atmosphere in the particular unit is impossible to work in, management is unsatisfactory, or its unsafe, then by all means leave ASAP. However, if its just a bad case of the jitters, know that this is normal and no one expects you to know everything whether you have 1 year or 20 years experience. There are always people there to help you and you will learn who the 'go to' people are who wants to 'eat their young'. Just know that most new grads feel the same way you do and that there IS a light at the end of the tunnel. I would stick it out a year or longer and see if nursing really is for you and try to pinpoint things you like and don't like and move around to find your niche.

I do not think 3 months is long enough to really grasp what you need to grasp, heck, in 3 months you're lucky if you've found the bathroom! I would say give it a chance, you may be suprised how you feel a year from now.

november17, ASN, RN

Specializes in Ortho, Case Management, blabla.

Get out of med-surg. Work nights.

I thought you were my daughter posting at first. She finished school in May also. I agree w/ the above poster. Med-surg is a thankless job, there is no way to get it all done. Get out of Med-surg ASAP and if you can really sleep, often night shift is better. I have been doing this for almost 22 years now and I know how hard it is for me some days. I am just amazed and appalled at how downright nasty some of the experienced (often not highly experienced) nurses are to new grads. All I can say is give yourself time. Know it is not you. Those who tell you they were "doing way better than you at this point" are either sufferring from early onset dementia or telling the biggest lies of their life. No one comes out of school ready to hit the ground running. If the new grad thinks so, they need a psych evaluation. I think the truth of it is that some nurses feel they have earned the right to treat others the way they were treated when they were new. Try to focus on the positives and the positive people. Usually it is just a few who are nasty, but this seems to be magnified many times over when you are the target. Though school didn't prepare you or any of us to function completely, do not sell yourself short. You have a lot to offer. It is just that your learning is not complete (not that is ever is) at the moment. Time will make such a difference for you. Nursing is a huge responsibility, in time you will feel up to the task, but you should never slide into total comfort with the job. You always have to be alert for potential problems. That can be stressful but once your other ducks are in a row, it is usually okay.

Nights may be a good option for you. On days, you have all of management, doctors writing orders, irritating families, etc. Many times, you can learn more on days, but it can be overwhelming. I spent three long years in med-surg cardiac, and the past 18+ in Ob, many of them nights. I have never regretted changing specialties. It is a much more doable job, but certainly there are many others. I have a former co-worker who works for an insurance company 9-5, wears nice clothes and loves her job and lifestyle. Finding your niche, is the biggest task and can be hard. There are many things you can learn along the way. Honestly, I had a terrible time as a new grad, but I am very glad I stuck with it. I hope I never lose sight of how hard it is to be new. I wish you all of the best. ((((HUGS)))):

catshowlady

Specializes in ICU.

I have also recently finished my first year as a nurse. I, too, dreaded going in to work at first. New job, new work environment, new people, new profession - it's a lot. And I had five years experience as a tech/unit clerk, so taking care of patients and the hospital workflow were not new to me, just the RN role. I am also older than you (36), and I had been working jobs with a fair amount of responsibility before I changed to nursing as my career. So I can only imagine how you might be feeling.

Remember that a new job ranks as one of the top life stressors a person can go through, right up there with a divorce. I can't think of a single job I worked at that I felt halfway competent at before being on the job at least six months, let alone something as challenging as nursing.

Give yourself some time to adjust. I still feel pretty green most days, but the pieces are starting to fit together better. So have faith, it does get better, and don't be too hard on yourself in the meantime.:icon_hug: It isn't easy, but (I think) it's ultimately worth it.

debi49

Specializes in psych,maternity, ltc, clinic.

Hope for the best with this new job. It may be way better. And if find hosp. nursing isnt for you, try clinic, group homes, assisted living,school nurse, home care., privated duty....try to stick this out for a year tho, as most jobs want a years experience. Good luck!

Melinurse

Specializes in LTC, case mgmt, agency.

Hope for the best with this new job. It may be way better. And if find hosp. nursing isnt for you, try clinic, group homes, assisted living,school nurse, home care., privated duty....try to stick this out for a year tho, as most jobs want a years experience. Good luck!

I agree. Maybe it is just that hospital nursing is not your thing. Try other feilds of nursing too. I'm a new grad too working LTC and agency. I feel much more confident and happier. Good luck.

I found working on my "med-surg escape route" plan helped me get through my first year.

Don't be too quick to give up on nursing.

I'm curious about what type of jobs your friends have.

femilydia

Specializes in Occupational Health.

just follow your heart,and do what your heart tells you.

1styearsucks

Specializes in med-surg.

Med-surge escape route...lol. that was hillarious!!! To answer your question my friends do not nessecarily have fabulous exciting jobs, they have jobs with less stress and responsibility.:)

Responsibility for someone's life is a big deal. It's sometimes overwhelming for those of us who are much older and more experienced; I can't imagine how terrifying it can be for those in their early 20s.

I love, love love working medical floor. I love it. I can never understand why people hate it. One thing I love is my coworkers. We have such a great group of people. Staffing is more than adequate most days. Hmm, maybe the problem is your facility?

Three months is not enough time to figure out if you like something or not. And about your friends? Well, I guess you can either be jealous that they have less meaningful jobs with less responsibility, or you can be proud that you have a more meaningful job with more responsibility. Is the cup half empty or half full for you? I personally can never be jealous of my paper-pusher, cubby working friends. I feel sorry for them.

ineedcoffee

Specializes in ICU, PACU.

I had those thoughts about my friends when I was right out of school too. That maybe an office type job was the way to go. But now I realize that with nursing there are SO many options to specialize in which DON'T suck. Also the scheduling is great for parents and many of those office jobs are not. Also, those same people that appear to be loving life right now may not have job stability or make as much money as you, esp after a few years and they are bored. Give it some time.

I understand how you feel. I remember when I started about two years ago, I almost quit three months into the job. I was overwhelmed and I felt that I had too much responsibilities and I was not that mature to handle it. Add to the fact that even the NM said that I am the youngest member in the team. But I hurdled it---I stayed and I learned many things along the way. When I was starting out, one experienced RN told me that whenever he switched from one job to another, he also feels that "uncomfortable feeling" but it goes away (about 6-12 months) as you become more confident as each day passes by. That stuck in my mind. And whenever I feel that it is a hard day, I just think of what he told me. Now it's been almost two years, I am glad I stayed and I listened. Maybe one thing that helped too was that I started out doing Psych---and that's what I always wanted to do.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I had those thoughts about my friends when I was right out of school too. That maybe an office type job was the way to go. But now I realize that with nursing there are SO many options to specialize in which DON'T suck. Also the scheduling is great for parents and many of those office jobs are not. Also, those same people that appear to be loving life right now may not have job stability or make as much money as you, esp after a few years and they are bored. Give it some time.

Ineedcoffee and others have offered great advice. Hang in there, consider other types of nursing jobs/shifts and if you still aren't happy quit and become a barrista while its fun! Just don't ever let your nursing license lapse. Kudos to you because at your age I wasn't even responsible enough to finish college.

Hello all I just feel like sharing some thoughts with people who understand. i am a new nurse who graduated in May and worked as a RN for three months my first nursing job did not work out. However, this is not what this post is about.

I have been out of work for 2 months and will be beginning a new job at another hospital in December. And the truth is...I do not want to go back!!! I have seen what it is like to be a professional nurse in the real world and am not interested at all.But I have a degree,loans to pay back and need to make a livlihood for myself so I will be going back to nursing.

Since I have been off I have seen how others my age live. They are happier, have less responsibility. I feel the responsibilty of nursing and the stress has aged me beyond my years. I just do not want to go back to this profession. I have no desire. I have come to the conclusion that I need to give it a year and if I still feel this way I will pursue other options.Just felt like sharing.Thanks for listening

Ok, I'll offer my thoughts here, even if they aren't likely to be the most popular response you'll see. But they are honest.

Anything worthwhile in this life, meaning any job or career, anything you do at all, comes with a fair share of responsibility and stress. The paychecks that are the most attractive also come with the greater share of responsibility and effort. The jobs that you describe as carefree, low-stress, low-responsibility also mean low wages and typically low satisfaction.

If you wish to spend your life with the least amount of stress and the least amount of responsibility (an attractive option at 23, I'm sure, especially after seeing the "real" world!) you can also expect to have the least of material things in this world, and the least meaningful existence. By this I mean that yes, you can work as a cashier the rest of your days, punch a clock in and out and that's that, but you also have a meager paycheck to show for it and a pretty limited satisfaction. At the end of the cashier's day (and, at the end of 15 years of cashier's days) do you think your friend will be looking back on the rewards of her career? How she bettered the world because she was there? That the fact that she WENT to work mattered at all? Somehow, I seriously doubt it.

We all have the desire to do the least amount of work for the greatest reward. Human nature. But having that nursing license allows you to FIND what that means--to you. It allows you to find a position you DO like, doing what you DO like, and still earning a viable means of support. Your friends who have minimum wage jobs do not have those options. They will be forced to take whatever job is there, doing whatever needs to be done, because that's all they can do. And it gets old FAST. The 'who cares' job at 19 doesn't look or feel the same at 29. A dead end job is just that.

That cashier job you covet at the moment because of its breezy lack of responsibility also does not come without IT'S fair share of grief: do you think your friends always have great bosses, and always work the schedule they want, and never get stuck because someone called out--or had a co-worker who was so lazy that more work was had by the rest of the staff? All the time.

Look around at nursing options, try different places, try different shifts. Look where your niche might be, and give yourself a chance to MAKE something of this.

The world can wait for another gas station attendant, fast food fryer, or cashier.

Virgo_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac Telemetry, ED.

I remember those feelings all too well. The butterflies would start fluttering about in my stomach as I put on my scrubs, found my ID badge, packed my lunch, and headed off to work. In the locker room, as I pulled out my stethoscope and med key, and began the walk up the hallway to the report room, those butterflies turned into a "feeling of impending doom", not knowing what I would be faced with today. Of course, once I hit the floor, I was way too busy to bother with those feelings. I had work to do; a lot of work. If it was a horrible night, I would think "I want OUT!", and start looking at other job openings, or fantasize about working at Taco Bell.

It's been over a year, and you know what? I'm okay. I'm glad I saw it through. I have toughened up more than I thought possible, and though I feel pretty solid on the basics, I still have much to learn, and the thought of all that I have to learn no longer scares me, but it is exciting!

I know this is not where I want to be forever. I do not want to retire from floor nursing. By the time I retire, I want to have done many different things, many advanced practice things. I don't want to retire completely burnt out on the human race with a broken back and a body riddled with stress related illness.

But, for now, and for the next little while, this is a great place to be.

So I guess what I would say is tough it out! Nursing is HARD, especially the first year. These feelings you have are so common among new nurses in their first year. Your friends might seem happier with their lower stress jobs, but you have an opportunity to go places you never imagined.

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