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I say this patient is being abused...

Nurses   (4,481 Views 35 Comments)

DutchgirlRN has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in OB, M/S, HH, Medical Imaging RN.

1 Article; 21,647 Profile Views; 3,932 Posts

I assessed a patient last week who was very quiet and timid. Her dh was loud and bossy. I would ask the pt a question and he wouldn't let her answer, he did all the talking. When he spoke loudly I could see that she was cowaring. I almost got the idea when she looked at me that her eyes were asking for help. She did try to answer one question and he told her "NO! I told you that's not how it was be quiet". When she left her appt with her dh she looked at me again with that help me look on her face. I'm not allowed to report anything without talking to my immediate supervisor. He/She was out of town. I will talk to Him/Her tomorrow and hopefully something will be done.

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Sabby_NC specializes in ICU, SDU, OR, RR, Ortho, Hospice RN.

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Unfortunately she will have to do something herself. What is there to report Dutch other than the behavior of the husband and the look in the patient's eyes. My mother was abused and we all knew it but our hands were tied until she herself did something about it.

A child you can get the courts involved but with a consenting adult your hands are behind your back hon.

It is very sad when you feel that something is going. Now witnessing him hurting her in some way maybe then you can report it eh?

I do hope she is going to be ok though. :(

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168 Posts; 2,815 Profile Views

That is abuse, the patient should be able to speak because the pt is the subject that needs to be treated and remember about 80% of communication is conveyed through body language. Do what is right and report it to your supervisor mainly because they're paid extra to handle matters such as this.

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santhony44 is a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in FNP, Peds, Epilepsy, Mgt., Occ. Ed.

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After talking with your supervisor, you could try reporting to Adult Protective Services.

Unfortunately, I think you are very probably right about the patient.

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meownsmile is a BSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

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The patient has the right to be interviewed and assessed in private. Maybe if you explained that the privacy act dictates that she be assessed and interviewed in private he might back off for a few minutes. I know a long shot but could be a trump card to shut him up a bit.

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SharonH, RN has 20 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, Geriatrics.

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There is absolutely nothing you or your supervisor can do about this. If she wants/needs help she will have to make the first step at the very least. So far all I have heard is that the husband is an overbearing jerk. Looking you with needy eyes is not enough for anyone to take any action whatsoever.

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caroladybelle is a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/Haemetology/HIV.

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The DH should have been taken out of the room, and patient been given privacy to discuss issues. The reason can be due to privacy issues.

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4,700 Posts; 38,051 Profile Views

If in doubt report your concers to the county, your supervisor via an incident report

Depending on how the abuse and neglect laws are written in your state the equirement that you discuss concerns with your supervisor prior to reporting may be illegal. (After all you are probably a mandated reporter as a licensed nurse which would trump any employer policy.)

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muffie has 25 years experience as a RN and specializes in cardiac med-surg.

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oh my

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kstec has 1 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Geriatrics/Family Practice.

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I had a patient who came in and I actually told to spouse to leave the room that this appointment was about my patient and not him. He did leave and afterwards I did wonder what price my patient had to pay. But I did find out that she was in a horrible relationship and suffered from major depression. Next time I would not ask but tell the husband to leave the room. He's not your priority. And then just hope for the best. The favorite motto is "Do your best and bless the rest" We can't do everything but we can do our best for that moment.

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Sisukas has 12 years experience and specializes in Med Surg.

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Document the spouse's behaviour and the patient's mannerisms in her chart and suggest that information about shelters and battered spouse information be kept handy for her next visit. Then when she comes in again, either you or whoever is caring for her can explain the new "privacy policy" so he will leave the room. Do not give her the option of letting him stay. Make it the doctor's policy and really put it on yourself and not her and she is less likely to have to pay later for having him leave. Make sure any information you give her fits into her wallet and can be easily hidden.

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