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I am a new grad and got a job as ALF director position!

Geriatric   (22,301 Views 91 Comments)
by eve5483 eve5483 (Member) Member

eve5483 has 1 years experience .

2,609 Profile Views; 56 Posts

You are reading page 2 of I am a new grad and got a job as ALF director position!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

bagladyrn is a RN and specializes in OB.

1 Follower; 2,286 Posts; 18,537 Profile Views

The fact that they would hire a new grad for this position is scary. I see one of two likelihoods:

1. They are clueless as to the true requirements of a director position and just want to fill the position with the correct position. (I'm being generous here) or

2. They are setting you up to be the "fall guy" for unpopular/unfair management decisions because you don't have the experience to realize what is safe and/or appropriate care and they see you as someone they could easily manipulate.

This is not meant to denigrate you! You need and deserve the time to hone your skills with experienced nurses before being put in a high stress/high possibility of blame position.

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SanFranSRNA has 5 years experience and specializes in CIC, CVICU, MSICU, NeuroICU.

134 Posts; 3,516 Profile Views

I am happy for you. Know your limitations and know where you can seek help. Good luck

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119 Posts; 3,063 Profile Views

My first job in my previous career, I was hired for a Director position. The position description was the same as what I studied for and what my classmates were doing elsewhere but the title changed because I was the only one in the building. It was a steep learning curve but the title helped advance my career and paycheck :) This was also during a recession. I was chosen for my energy, willingness to learn and motivation-plus they were willing to train me. So it sounds like you were the right candidate for the position regardless of experience.

Just a CYA-I personally would look out for warning signs and follow gut intuition. Write everything down/email detailed descriptions to yourself JUST in case you need it.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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I think the other posters are jealous....

Oh, puleeze.

Really, it's just common sense - how can you lead people when you don't even know how to do the job you're leading?

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520 Posts; 7,743 Profile Views

Congratulations on the new position! I want to be encouraging and not negative, but my first job out of nursing school was not a positive start and after that I wanted to quit nursing all together. Just know your limits and ask a lot of questions!

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455 Posts; 5,247 Profile Views

My mentor (the one who is a director at this moment) said she will train me for 4 mons:)

4 Months?

Or 4 Mondays?

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eve5483 has 1 years experience.

56 Posts; 2,609 Profile Views

4 Months?

Or 4 Mondays?

Sorry 4 months

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150 Posts; 4,499 Profile Views

Congratulations on your new job -

Good luck with the transition. I hope that this is not a case of being hired to take the fall like another poster pointed out. That happened to me once (not in nursing) and it took me a very long time to recover, emotionally and professionally. I think everyone just wants you to be aware of the possibilities.

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29 Posts; 1,285 Profile Views

I am a new nursing student and, while I admit I have ZERO nursing experience, I'm feeling compelled to offer insight after being a corporate manager in several high pressure corporations and managing over 40 employees.

In some ways, and I truly mean no disrespect to anyone, it's no wonder many folks have trouble finding and keeping jobs--the level of cynicism on these boards is overwhelming. This new graduate gets hired and many folks find a reason to be negative and chastise? New nurses start out and others pitch in just to say how miserable they are? How is that contributing to the field?

Trust me when I say I've been miserable in jobs before (hence the reason I opted to change careers!) but, I've always recognized when I've had areas of opportunity to improve--something that seems severely lacking here. I've also been a patient more times in one year than most people are in their lifetimes, and I can't tell you how many times I've been demeaned and belittled by nurses. This cynical, negative attitude seeps over into patient care and is bred into new nurses, too. When I was a new manager, I didn't have a bunch of Senior Managers telling me all of the things they didn't like about the job...obviously those things exist in EVERY JOB and in EVERY INDUSTRY. Further, when I was a Senior Manager, I practiced the same discretion. Just because something bothers me doesn't mean I'm entitled to diminish the viewpoint of another with my negativity.

In short, to the new grad just hired, CONGRATS to you--clearly your hiring manager saw something in you that the found to be a good fit for them and, while you will surely have plenty of challenges, you will likely grow and develop into an even better nurse. I interviewed hundreds of candidates over my time as a manager and oftentimes the person with experience didn't have the coachability and positive attitude that the "new graduate" had, thus truly making them a better fit.

It seems like what this industry needs is folks to start fostering an environment of positive, less entitled attitudes. When nurses say, "Oh, it will never change," that is a choice.

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eve5483 has 1 years experience.

56 Posts; 2,609 Profile Views

Thank you everyone! After I had my first interview, I talked to my fellow nursing graduates that I probably wouldn't even be qualified for this job. Well, now here I am :) I am just thankful to have this job. I am a geriatric nurse to the bone!! It is a beautiful assisted living and everyone is passionate (so far). Hopefully after 4 months of training, I will post something positive on here- I will remember to learn how to save my butt also!!!!

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KeechieSan has 8 years experience and specializes in ICU, MICU, SICU.

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I am a new nursing student

And would you want to do clinical time in a facility that has a new grad as a director? No, you wouldn't. Policies won't be enforced because the person who is tasked with enforcing them doesn't understand them. I'm sorry..it is exciting that you got this job since I realize that it is harder out there now, but reconsider. Its like the old saying "if it sounds too good to be true, then it probably is". A new grad has no business being a director! You don't even know how to be a nurse yet! Do you really think that the nurses under you are going to respect you or be able to take direction from you? Heck no! They might like you as a person, but really they know that you have no clue what is going on! If they need to come to you about problems that are clinical related, how are you going to give them answers? Sure, you can be trained in the administrative aspect of the position no problem, but you cannot be trained in the clinical part of your job (and believe me, no matter what they tell you there is a clinical part!) without hands-on experience.

Oh, and this post is not written out of "jealousy" as a previous poster stated. I am truly concerned that they are not preparing you for what is going to be a very difficult and frustrating job if you don't have experience. Hell, its difficult even if you do! Please, reconsider!!

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18 Posts; 1,490 Profile Views

"Basically all the Nursing Jobs will be done by an lpn or CNAs with Qmap. Pretty much no nursing skills other than assessment and TB shots"

Since when does LPN/CNA do NURSING ASSESSMENTS?

I strongly suggest you learn your state's nursing code before you begin this job. In addition, how could you possibly consider yourself experienced enough to handle all staffing, handle all patient family concerns and do so with confidence??

I will admit there are those RARE new nursing graduates that might be able to handle this position right out of the gates...but boy oh boy talk about stress.

GOOD LUCK. AND, I am in NO way jealous. Been there done that as DON of LCT for a grand total of one week once I saw how the place was run..

Edited by JennaJonRN
additional comment.

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