Jump to content

I don't get it

Posted

Specializes in critical care.

So, anytime I've ever read here about people getting "snippy" about "status", it's been over the BSNs thinking they're better than the ADNs, or the BSNs and ADNs being bothered when someone goes for their MSN. Today I got to overhear one that actually got under my skin.

I've been accepted into the local BSN program and begin in the fall. Where I live, there are three programs--one BSN, at the local university, and an ADN and an LPN, at the community college. The LPN is admittedly more competitive to get into. If you complete it, you are usually a shoe-in for the ADN. The BSN is a little less competitive, but only a little. I have a 3.85, had a 93 on the A2, and I got in, whereas a classmate had an A2 in the 80's, same GPA and did not get in. I'm guessing I barely made it.

So anyway, I'm in a CNA class because I'm broke and need to start working while I'm still in school. This guy in the class was talking to this lady and they were basically saying how anyone who would waste their time going in the BSN program is an idiot, and it's so much easier to get into that pretty much anyone could just walk in. I wanted to say to the guy, "Oh, yeah, buddy? We'll see how you feel about that when our resumes are sitting in the same pile." But, alas, part of our grade in this CNA class is based on us being on our best behavior. So, I kept it to myself.

What's the deal, though? We're in this together, right? I don't think my degree is better than someone else's degree. I think my degree is better for what I intend to do with it (go on to masters) but if I had no intentions of stepping foot in a graduate school, I would likely have applied to the ADN program instead. But why should that matter? We all work together. We all have the same goals. We should all be nice and supportive of each other. Right?

I ended up not saying one damn thing to the guy. But seriously.....I wanted to. Today was only our second day, so if he keeps it up, I might say something. Nothing rude (at least, I hope it wouldn't come out as rude) but informative nonetheless. Just because my path isn't his preferred path doesn't mean my path is any lesser or bad. grrrrrr

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 40 years experience.

Consider the source. this argument is as old as the profession. Every Time I think the dead horse can't be beat anymore someone grabs the whip and takes one more lash. Until nursing has one entry level for education this argument will go on. I will say that if you are young, the move is closer for requiring new grads to have the BSN. The job market is tight and competitive. There are new grad BSN that have been looking for work for over a year in some parts of the country.

In a hundred years is this guys opinion going to make a difference in your life? No? then just ignore his ignorance.

Congratualtions on getting in!!!!!! Good luck in school!!:hug:

Scarlettz, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg ICU step-down, Psych. Has 7 years experience.

I wouldn't stress over it too much. Do the best you can in your path - and don't let others bring you down.

I am in an ADN program right now and I am aware that I will need more schooling (I am enrolled for an RN-to-BSN program next fall.) I am not sure what it's like in your area, but many hospitals around me require a bachelors now. So, it is quite possible that this man will have to go onto more schooling anyway. I don't regret my decision to start off with the ADN program. I chose it for a number of reasons that were right for me.

You seem to be the mature person in the situation by not openly criticizing those around you who have chosen a different path. Remain confident in your decision and stay positive!

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

Thank you-- you both are definitely right. It's just hard to hear a perfect stranger say your chosen path makes you an idiot. :\

sharpeimom

Specializes in ortho, hospice volunteer, psych,. Has 20 years experience.

the guy who said that probably has different future plans than you do or he might have been trying to bolster his own sagging ego by

knocking yours down a few pegs. nasty but all too frequent sometimes.

my mom used to tell me not to let whichever kid was bothering me in junior high school, not to gain the upper edge. she'd say not to let

her rent free space inside my head. in other words, mentally tell that person to go to xxxx inside your head! it's very liberating! outwardly, stay polite but don't let the jerks get to you. it isn't worth it -- ever.

just remember how much farther you will go with your m.s.n. than he will as whatever he ends up as (and no, i'm not putting down

those with other education levels.)

The truth is nursing is going to be a second career for me, so I picked going for ASN so I could get done sooner. But I will be going for my BSN and then MSN eventually. Having just an ASN limits a nurses hire prospects since some hospitals will only hire BSNs, never mind the hospitals that are going for magnet status.

veggie530

Specializes in CCRN, ED, Unit Manager. Has 3 years experience.

To each his own, to be honest.

You were right to not say anything -- he's entitled to his opinion. Where I'm at, it's so easy to transition to a BSN after getting your RN that I do feel it's too expensive to pay for a BSN for the entire nursing education and almost pointless. But if I had the disposable income, I might view it differently. That being said, I wouldn't call anyone an "idiot" over it, because if they can afford it then all the power to them.

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

I think here it ends up being six one way half a dozen the other. The only difference is the time. The ADN by itself will be cheaper probably by a good $10k-$15k. But if you decide to go ADN-BSN, you would end up paying more and spending probably another year longer than just going BSN because the university requires the gen eds, and then a year of nursing classes. It's absurd, to tell the truth. If you never want more than ADN, then it makes sense to go that route, but if you want BSN in face to face classes, you just have to do it from the starting line.

So, anytime I've ever read here about people getting "snippy" about "status", it's been over the BSNs thinking they're better than the ADNs, or the BSNs and ADNs being bothered when someone goes for their MSN. Today I got to overhear one that actually got under my skin.

I've been accepted into the local BSN program and begin in the fall. Where I live, there are three programs--one BSN, at the local university, and an ADN and an LPN, at the community college. The LPN is admittedly more competitive to get into. If you complete it, you are usually a shoe-in for the ADN. The BSN is a little less competitive, but only a little. I have a 3.85, had a 93 on the A2, and I got in, whereas a classmate had an A2 in the 80's, same GPA and did not get in. I'm guessing I barely made it.

So anyway, I'm in a CNA class because I'm broke and need to start working while I'm still in school. This guy in the class was talking to this lady and they were basically saying how anyone who would waste their time going in the BSN program is an idiot, and it's so much easier to get into that pretty much anyone could just walk in. I wanted to say to the guy, "Oh, yeah, buddy? We'll see how you feel about that when our resumes are sitting in the same pile." But, alas, part of our grade in this CNA class is based on us being on our best behavior. So, I kept it to myself.

What's the deal, though? We're in this together, right? I don't think my degree is better than someone else's degree. I think my degree is better for what I intend to do with it (go on to masters) but if I had no intentions of stepping foot in a graduate school, I would likely have applied to the ADN program instead. But why should that matter? We all work together. We all have the same goals. We should all be nice and supportive of each other. Right?

I ended up not saying one damn thing to the guy. But seriously.....I wanted to. Today was only our second day, so if he keeps it up, I might say something. Nothing rude (at least, I hope it wouldn't come out as rude) but informative nonetheless. Just because my path isn't his preferred path doesn't mean my path is any lesser or bad. grrrrrr

First of all congrats on getting into the BSN program :) Well Done!!!

In my vey limited experience to survive on the floor one must do a lot of smiling and waving....know what I mean? Dont let people goad you to anger.....

This guy is more than likely just jealous....

Just do your thing and dont let anything stand in your way.

I wish you the very best!!

In my case, it didn't make sense to do the ADN. With my previous bachelor's degree, it worked out to about the same amount of time to do either degree. I got credit for all my pre-reqs from degree 1, so it ended up being only about 1 semester more to get the BSN. Made me smart to do it that way, not at all "an idiot." ;)

I would not let him bother you. I am still working towards my classes to apply to an ADN program, knowing full well that I will immediately have to get into an RN-BSN program after that. I really wish that I had the ability to go into a BSN program from the start. Congrats on making it into the program and good luck!

bbgirlmil

Specializes in Geriatrics. Has 2 years experience.

My instructor told me once in LPN school that "nurses love to eat their young". So far (2 years now) I have found this to be true, sad, but true. One nurse always wants to be better than the other.

To me it doesn't make a difference. Good for you for going for your goals! Proud of you!

I completed my ADN program, and although a local BSN program does require more pre-reqs, I am able to bypass most of them at the university since I took classes for my AA in liberal arts while on the waiting list for the nursing program..actually I am finishing my last two classes now. I will be able to get into the RN-BSN program with only 10 nursing classes to complete online- saving a few thousand dollars by taking most pre-reqs at the community college where I got my ADN (many of my ADN classes fufill required "core" areas) There are so many different paths in Nursing- I see that the trend is torward BSN prepared RN's, but the ADN program got me started on building my nursing experience a two years earlier! Plus that RN paycheck is better for paying university tuition!! Best of luck to you and all other students (like myself!) :)

ivikatasha

Specializes in trauma and neuro.

I think here it ends up being six one way half a dozen the other. The only difference is the time. The ADN by itself will be cheaper probably by a good $10k-$15k. But if you decide to go ADN-BSN, you would end up paying more and spending probably another year longer than just going BSN because the university requires the gen eds, and then a year of nursing classes. It's absurd, to tell the truth. If you never want more than ADN, then it makes sense to go that route, but if you want BSN in face to face classes, you just have to do it from the starting line.

I am an ADN student. I happen to be taking the gen eds for the BSN while getting my ADN degree. And in the long run I am saving a TON of money. I get grants which 100% cover my classes while getting my ADN, that would not have been the case if I started with BSN. Also the gen ed are much cheaper at the CC then the 4 year school. I do plan on getting my masters one day. So not sure what this extra time is that you are talking about or the extra money that I would be paying......

Edited by ivikatasha

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

AAAARGH!!!! I could scream!!!!! I just wrote this massive response and it got eaten! Boooooo allnurses.com, BOOO!!!! :doh:

ivikatasha, I'll write it all out in detail again if you'd like, but basically, the price difference between ADN-BSN, and just straight BSN, if you do all of your prereqs and gen eds at the community college, is $19,200 for the ADN-BSN, and $21,000 for the straight BSN, so you're right about that route being cheaper, although not by very much at all. The difference in time, though, is pretty significant. The ADN program is 5 semesters, the gen eds for the BSN take 4 semesters, and then the BSN nursing classes are another 2. So you're looking at another year, unless you decide not to do your prerequisites as co-requisites before getting into the LPN/ADN program. If you do your prerequisites before starting nursing classes, you're looking at another 1-2 semesters. You'd be in school for at least another year doing the ADN-BSN program.

ivikatasha

Specializes in trauma and neuro.

I am wondering about the math there. The 4 year I plan on getting my BSN from (which is local and automatically accepts grads from the CC program) their credit hour cost is 3 times that of the CC credit hour. I wouldn't be taking any extra classes, so I would save way more then you say.

60-90 credits at the CC and then 60-30 credits at the 4 year at 3 times more vs 120 credits at the 4 year at 3 times more.

I would just have 2 years of nursing classes, and combined with 5 semester CC program, that is just a single extra semester of time vs a 4 year BSN. Which is a very small price to pay considering the thousands of dollars this route has saved me so far.

Also, with the ADN, I get my RN license before the BSN. I can work during my ADN-BSN and get the experience I need.

*I live in fear of my posts being eaten, happened too many times, so I copy the whole post I typed before hitting post comment*

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

I am wondering about the math there. The 4 year I plan on getting my BSN from (which is local and automatically accepts grads from the CC program) their credit hour cost is 3 times that of the CC credit hour. I wouldn't be taking any extra classes, so I would save way more then you say.

60-90 credits at the CC and then 60-30 credits at the 4 year at 3 times more vs 120 credits at the 4 year at 3 times more.

I would just have 2 years of nursing classes, and combined with 5 semester CC program, that is just a single extra semester of time vs a 4 year BSN. Which is a very small price to pay considering the thousands of dollars this route has saved me so far.

Also, with the ADN, I get my RN license before the BSN. I can work during my ADN-BSN and get the experience I need.

*I live in fear of my posts being eaten, happened too many times, so I copy the whole post I typed before hitting post comment*

I definitely feel you on the experience of it. I've actually been in a CNA class because I am so nervous about not having hands-on. I used to be a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator. I was a master at all of the theory stuff. I could tell you forward and backward the process of birth. But if you put me in front of a class, I was like a deer in the headlights. I was terrified! I can relate and teach well, one-on-one, but my lack of experience with groups made me choke. It was terrible! Experience is sooooo important! And if I'm putting this much time into something, I want to know I'm going to kick a** at it.

Okay, for all of the math stuff. I broke those numbers down like this. If you do all of your prereqs and gen eds at a CC no matter which program you do, it saves you money no matter what school you're looking at. So my calculations are based on the cheapest options I have available to me here where I live. The CC is roughly $100 per credit hour.

ADN program (which is LPN, then ADN): 70 credits, $7000

ADN-BSN bridge program: roughly 40 credits of gen eds (@ CC): $4,000

2 full time semesters of nursing classes at university: $7,300 (they charge a flat rate for full time)

Total: $19,300

BSN gen eds at CC: 60 credits, $6,000

BSN program: 4 semesters full time at university, $14,600

Total: $20,600

(My numbers are different by a few hundred because I decided to not be lazy and actually looked it up this time. :lol2:)

I participate on another board that eats posts all of the time, but I've never had it happen here before. The other board eats partial posts, though, so instead of losing the whole thing, you end up looking like a moron who can't complete a sentence. :bugeyes:

ivikatasha

Specializes in trauma and neuro.

ADN-BSN: 33 nursing credits $9900 (4 year rate $300 an hour) + $5400 (54 credits at 100 an hour, I can take all the the other classes at the CC expect for maybe one or 2) + 3300 (33 nursing credits imported from ADN program, taken at CC) = $18600 (may be $1000 high due to some gen eds not being able to take at CC)

BSN: (includes all nursing classes and geneds) 120 credits at $300 an hour = $36000

I am guessing it is just a huge difference in the way our schools work here and how they charge for tuition and what can be trasnferred in, but I am saving over $15,000 here.

Lets say I took all the gen eds at the CC, 54 of them, and just the nursing credits at the 4 year = $25200. Still saving $6,000ish.

I looked up my stuff too, the classes and such and rates, rounded a little, but both rates would be a little higher.

*shrug*