Jump to content

I.C. and Glove use

Home Health   (3,128 Views 12 Comments)
by Rizpah Rizpah (Member)

Rizpah specializes in LTC / SNF / Geriatrics.

3,092 Profile Views; 121 Posts

I have a friend that recently started a new position in home health and made an observation regarding glove use. She says that she has watched the nurses that she is following give IM injections without using gloves! and at some sort of health fair where they were performing blood glucose checks, the supervisor told them they should not be changing gloves so often - every 15 minutes is enough. :nono: I think some remedial infection control training is in order here. Problem is, one of the offenders is the supervisor.

Has something in Universal precautions changed that I'm not aware of? I don't think so! :uhoh3: A drop of blood is a drop of blood is a drop of blood.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

renerian is a BSN, RN and specializes in MS Home Health.

5,693 Posts; 15,194 Profile Views

I have never done an injection without gloves.............the HH policy your company has might say how to administer an injection. What is the policy?

renerian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jmgrn65 has 16 years experience as a RN and specializes in cardiac/critical care/ informatics.

1,344 Posts; 12,072 Profile Views

I don't usually glove for injections either. wash my hands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CapeCodMermaid has 30 years experience as a RN and specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health.

1 Follower; 6,061 Posts; 59,862 Profile Views

The Joint Commission AND DPH standards of practice mandate the wearing of gloves any time there might be contact with bodily fluids. Since there is the potential of that with both an injection and blood glucose testing with a glucometer, you MUST wear gloves when performing either of these two things AND change your gloves and wash your hands in between patients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

canoehead has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

2 Followers; 6,608 Posts; 48,722 Profile Views

If we wear gloves any time there might be contact with body fluids, we'll never take them off. I try to live with a happy medium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cattitude has 20 years experience and specializes in Lie detection.

695 Posts; 5,499 Profile Views

I do wear gloves w/injections. I was taught that they are an extra layer of protection especially if by chance there is a needlestick. Say perhaps there's a drop of blood on the needle and you have gloves on and prick your finger.

The glove acts as a mini barrier and "wipes" off the drop somewhat before the needle sticks you. Not foolproof by any means just a little extra protection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CapeCodMermaid has 30 years experience as a RN and specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health.

1 Follower; 6,061 Posts; 59,862 Profile Views

Gloves will not protect against a needle stick. If there is any blood on the needle and you get stuck, the glove WILL NOT protect you against anything. Any stick with a used needle should be treated as a medical emergency. Call your supervisor and have her call the local hospital ER to tell them you are coming post stick and will require prophylactic medicines based on their policies and protocols.

Anyone who gives care such as injections, IVs,glucometer checks and the like is just foolish to go gloveless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MadisonsMomRN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Addictions, Corrections, QA/Education.

377 Posts; 3,908 Profile Views

I ALWAYS wear gloves when the potential for contact with body fluids is evident.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cattitude has 20 years experience and specializes in Lie detection.

695 Posts; 5,499 Profile Views

Gloves will not protect against a needle stick. If there is any blood on the needle and you get stuck, the glove WILL NOT protect you against anything. Any stick with a used needle should be treated as a medical emergency. Call your supervisor and have her call the local hospital ER to tell them you are coming post stick and will require prophylactic medicines based on their policies and protocols.

Anyone who gives care such as injections, IVs,glucometer checks and the like is just foolish to go gloveless.

I never said they protect you completely against a needlestick, I'm not a dummy. I said it's a little extra insurance. A TEENSY TINY bit, that's all. Of course any stick should be treated as an emergency.

If you read through my post what I *did* say was the gloves could wipe off any residual blood on the outside of the needle and that COULD decrease the possibiltiy of transmitting a disease if a stick were to occur. That's what I was told by the ID nurse at my old hospital. It's all speculative of course but if wearing glove can help then why not? If I had to choose between a needle sticking my plain finger and a needle first having to penetrate a glove, I'll take the latter.

Also, checked up on WHO and OSHA, they both say that it's not necessary to wear gloves with injections unless a lot of blood is expected. I guess it's just personal preference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

clemmm78 has 25 years experience as a RN.

440 Posts; 6,852 Profile Views

I had to do a day of doing sticks for glucose and I tried to wear gloves. I can wear them for cleaning patients, pericare, etc, but I am not comfortable at all wearing them for things like finger sticks.

I've also never worn them for injections. When I still worked in the hospital, I did start wearing them for IVs but that was so awkward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

272 Posts; 9,049 Profile Views

I had to do a day of doing sticks for glucose and I tried to wear gloves. I can wear them for cleaning patients, pericare, etc, but I am not comfortable at all wearing them for things like finger sticks.

I've also never worn them for injections. When I still worked in the hospital, I did start wearing them for IVs but that was so awkward.

yes they are awkward, mostly because the gloves most places use are cheap and hang off due to serious misfit. I'm sorry, I can't start an I.V. with a freddy krooger hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×