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How did you pass nursing school

I am starting the RN BSN program this Spring 2017. Any advice for me? How did you pass nursing school

missmollie, ADN, BSN, RN

Has 4 years experience. Specializes in Neuroscience.

Studying is usually a great place to begin. Read your assignments, learn to procedures, teach back the pathophysiology to another student and listen when they ask a question. Allow them to do the same to you.

Get a great study book that gives you questions. The "success" series is perfect for any class. Understand why you missed the questions, review, and study.

Success series on amazon: Med-Surg Success: A Q&A Review Applying Critical Thinking to Test Taking (Davis's Q&a Series): 978

I studied hard, I didn't procrastinate, I was on time (early, actually) to everything, I was respectful to my instructors, and I was able to accept constructive criticism without getting defensive. And I looked to my clinical instructor to teach me rather than expecting the busy staff nurses to do it.

malamud69, ADN, BSN, EMT-B

Has 10 years experience. Specializes in Emergency.

I did NCLEX questions(numerous sources) from day 1...did not waste "precious/valuable" time reading the textbooks...it's ALL in the nclex format...don't let anybody fool you into believing you must read 600 pages to extract 1 paragraphs worth of useful information...good luck! That's what I did...everybody learns differently...just remember...Occams razor...it's usually the simplest answer...

How was your study habit like?

Nursling17

Has 2 years experience. Specializes in Orthopedics, Med-Tele, Dermatology.

I studied hard, I didn't procrastinate, I was on time (early, actually) to everything, I was respectful to my instructors, and I was able to accept constructive criticism without getting defensive. And I looked to my clinical instructor to teach me rather than expecting the busy staff nurses to do it.

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I showed up to tests and took them.

For me i was never a classroom learner, i showed up to all my classes but mentally i wasnt there. I went to a Christian college so they had alot of rules, one being i couldn't use cell phones in class, and ofcourse i got in trouble for this alot.

Everyday when i got home i self studied the topics that were covered by the instrutors, i made my own notes. I better grasped everything myself, you can't explain pathophysiology to me i have to review this myself. Clinicals were the same i was always the quiet one rarely ask anything, for skills i would practice on friends so i wouldn't seem clueless on Clinicals.

I really began studying for finals 1 week before, i would review for hours until the night before the exam. NCLEX was different considering i studied 2 and half months prior my exam for 5 to 8 hours a day.

Despite my self study approach in college i struggled alot and finished with a 3.2 GPA in the end.

My advice for anyone going through it right now: "kiss the right asses." And by that, I mean your clinical supervisor or instructor. Don't be the overly pushy student that gets in the way. Let your instructors hear what they want to hear, not what you want to say.

I've seen so many posts on this forum where someone comes in crying because he or she does not know how to interact with people.

Or would it be sufficient for me to simply tell you to use common sense?

The academic portion of nursing school isn't terribly difficult. It is time consuming, but there isn't anything in there that you should find to be too difficult.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I knew the syllabus and the objectives. Used rote memorization to achieve the objectives.

Keep your mouth closed and your eyes open.

You can do this:up:

Natasha, CNA, LVN

Has 1 years experience. Specializes in Psych.

Hi talk to former graduates/alumni at your school and get the inside on professors/clinical instructor and how to study best with each specific professor/clinical instructor. Nursing school is all about self teaching, time management, and most important mind over matter...not being afraid to ask questions, make mistakes, lose the thought of perfection, compare yourself to others, and learn to take criticism as strength mechanism. I wish you the best :)

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What is the best way to find the graduates at my school? Facebook?

I can definitely relate to you about not being a class learner. I prefer online classes but I'm trying to break out of that. I don't want to spend hours in class anymore just to be there for the sake of it. I have learned that reading the chapter before going to class really helps me to connect with the lesson. In the classroom, I am also the quiet type that is on the low but that's something I am changing about myself. I'm learning to speak up when I have questions.

Everyone finds something that works for them, so this is what I did when I was on top of things.

I did the readings most of the time. We had Pearson's online text mostly, so I would have that open and make flashcards on quizlet as I went. Then I'd go to lecture with the powerpoint printed on paper or open on my iPad and take notes, and I'd make more flashcards based on the lectures. I'd review both from time to time, with the classroom lecture being the priority of the two. This prep/review left not much actual cramming for tests and I frequently did quite well on tests without really "studying" specifically for them.

For physiology it's helpful to find videos from Khan academy, Simple nursing, etc to break things down to a simple level. Reading physiology books is really dry and unnecessarily complex and I eventually gave up on that, though I still read what Pearson had to say about it.

Assignments count for a lot. Do them.

I'm not always the most motivated of students so I didn't always do all this to a T but these were my goals and it got me through. As others said it's not so much the content being spectacularly difficult, just very time consuming. NCLEX review is helpful as well since a lot of test questions are more about critical thinking than the ability to spit out actual content.

Let your instructors hear what they want to hear, not what you want to say.

And along those lines, when answering test questions (particularly NCLEX style questions), I always found it helpful to think not in terms of what I would necessarily answer, but what do THEY want me to answer? When you put yourself in their shoes, it's easier to find the "best" correct answer.

At least that was what worked for me.

I can definitely relate to you about not being a class learner. I prefer online classes but I'm trying to break out of that. I don't want to spend hours in class anymore just to be there for the sake of it. I have learned that reading the chapter before going to class really helps me to connect with the lesson. In the classroom, I am also the quiet type that is on the low but that's something I am changing about myself. I'm learning to speak up when I have questions.

Are you doing rn to bsn online or by going to class?

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