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How do I pursue nursing with a Health Science undergraduate degree?

I'm a freshman at a private college with a 27% graduate rate. You only get TWO chances to repeat a class. Due to a low grade in Anatomy, I had drop out of the class during the midterm. With that being said, I do not want to risk going back to the nursing program since it is very risky for me to be kicked out of the program.

Therefore, I am pursuing a Health Science degree. Will this set me back? Any advice? How should I move forward so that I can be a nurse?

Thank you.

Side note: My college is tuition-free for your first four years, so I will not be planning to switch schools.

Edited by tnbutterfly

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education.

With a bachelors degree, you could apply for an accelerated nursing program. However, you will still need to complete all of the programs prereqs, which is going to include A&P. Additionally, most programs only allow 2 repeats- or even only 1. A school with only a 27% grad rate is one that is spewing red flags everywhere. If the grad rate is so low, what is the school doing wrong? Free tuition doesn't necessarily mean you're getting a good deal.

Maybe you could do it self paced. The health science degree is alright but in terms of the prerequisites, the curriculum for that health science degree is gonna be even more work; I did it and I didn't do those prerequisites.

You said you had a low grade in A&P I and you only have one chance. I think if you really want to be a nurse and finish at that school you need to take some time on the courses putting you at risk.

Thank you for the fast reply. Basically, what you're saying is that after I graduate from my undergrad with a bachelors degree in Health Science, I am able to take a nursing program? How long is a nursing program? And when can I start working as a nurse? Do I have to work at random jobs until I finish my nursing program?

Thank you again, you have helped me more than you realize!

Thank you for the response, what do you mean by the health science career being "more work"?

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education.

You can still apply to nursing programs, but you will still need to complete those prereqs. The length of the program will depend upon the program itself. You can start working as a nurse after you complete the program, pass NCLEX, and receive a nursing license. What jobs you work at during the program is up to you- you just won't qualify for any job that requires licensure you don't have.

Thank you for the response, what do you mean by the health science career being "more work"?

WELL i wanted to maintain my grades and in order to do that I had to focus at what was at hand. My focus was on health education but if your focus is more on science and it includes your prerequisites' it seems you have nothing to worry about.

Everyone is different, that's just the way I learned how to balance my academics' goals better. You shall go about it however you like, I'm just sharing my experience.í ½í¹‚

Thank you for the response, what do you mean by the health science career being "more work"?

WELL i wanted to maintain my grades and in order to do that I had to focus at what was at hand. My focus was on health education but if your focus is more on science and it includes your prerequisites' it seems you have nothing to worry about.

Everyone is different, that's just the way I learned how to balance my academics' goals better. You shall go about it however you like, I'm just sharing my experience.🙂

RescueNinjaKy

Specializes in Cath/EP lab, CCU, Cardiac stepdown.

Thank you for the fast reply. Basically, what you're saying is that after I graduate from my undergrad with a bachelors degree in Health Science, I am able to take a nursing program? How long is a nursing program? And when can I start working as a nurse? Do I have to work at random jobs until I finish my nursing program?

Thank you again, you have helped me more than you realize!

whether you finish your health science degree, you need to get into a nursing program to become a nurse. You can either apply now for the one in school, but you seem opposed to that idea. So your other choices include transferring to another school to get into their nursing program or apply to another school with a nursing program when you graduate.

As far as how long it takes to complete the nursing program, it varies depending on the program and the individual. Generally speaking if you have completed all your prerequisites, then 2 years for a standard associates degree nursing program and 4 years for a bachelors program. Of course you can go faster if you take more classes or join an accelerated program. If you are missing prerequisites it will take you longer.

For working as a nurse, you can work as a nurse ONLY when you become a licensed nurse. So that means graduating with your nursing degree, and pass the board exam(NCLEX) and receiving your license. A health science major cannot work as a nurse because they aren't one, similarly, a nursing student or even a nursing graduate cannot work as a nurse because they are not licensed.

And finally I am unsure what you mean by working random job. If you want to get a job to get some money while you're in school, you can do that, and it certainly is feasible, but certainly not a job as a nurse since you're not a nurse yet.

Since you will be transferring to another school to enter a nursing program, you can take anatomy over again at a local community college, (as well as the other nursing prerequisites, if you choose), and then you will submit the transcripts from all the schools you attend to the ultimate nursing program school. There is no reason to have to take all your prerequisite courses at one school. People attend different schools for different reasons. Eventually, you have to send transcripts from all schools attended to your final school and they pick the courses that they will give you credit for toward their degree.

No matter where you retake anatomy, suggest you analyze your weakness in that subject, and restudy, on your own, before the retake. If you feel you must, arrange for a private tutor, or do whatever other measures are necessary to make certain you are successful the second time around. Good luck.

Solution #1:

Consider transferring to a college with a higher graduate rate, and a reputable nursing program (i.e. >85% of the class graduate AND pass the NCLEX).

Solution #2:

Transfer to another college with a better graduation rate. Get a degree in something that leads to a job~ (for instance, finance, accounting, etc.) and do the prereqs for a nursing program. Then, if you are still interested, go through an accelerated BSN program or a graduate-entry nursing program. Side note: if you can afford it, do the accelerated BSN nursing program. Believe or not, getting a MSN without the experience may help you look attractive to HR but a target to nurses with a BSN or less.

Edited by DTWriter

Better late than never to respond.

I was a Health Care Administrator for a long time before I went back to get my nursing degree. I had to take A&P over, stats over, Biology over due to greater than 5 years since my last what I call STEM classes. I am glad I did. When I studied A&P the first time there was one page devoted to HIV...seriously. It was a note about this up and coming disease (I can see you all smiling).

If you want to go this route I strongly suggest you get what you are going through now out of the way. If you need STEM courses take one at a time and devote much studying to that so your grade will be high.

There are a number of accelerated nursing courses you can get into with your background, you just need to work hard at it and be the best nurse you can be. I would not wait to go back I would just keep moving forward until you are where you want to be.

You mentioned about your school and pass rate/graduation rate. I will not comment on that. I will say when you look at education look for regionally accredited NOT national accreditation. Look for nurse associations when you choose a nursing school that they are affiliated with. And finally look at the bios of the instructors, they are the ones teaching I want instructors that have been there, have experience...I prefer nun instructors who have a nursing background as my interaction with them from my experience...is they are tough as nails, that learning with them is painful but wow you will be a nurses nurse afterward. I went back to an accelerated nursing school... one near Chicago and I did receive a great education that has made me a wonderful nurse. Lastly never become stagnated in your nursing career. This is the one thing that frightens me when I start to work with nurses young and old. Always seek out continuing education, always seek out refresher courses, never think you have mastered something because things change and always listen to your patients.

SopranoKris, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

Just something to consider: Anatomy & Physiology are the building blocks to the foundation you'll need to understand the pathophysiology of disease process. Without a solid understanding (aka good grades) in these courses, you will find it likely that you'll struggle in your nursing courses. I can't tell you the number of times I've seen people fail out of nursing school because they barely squeaked by in their A&P courses (particularly Physiology).

If you needed to drop out of the Anatomy course, I would look long and hard at the reason why. Were you not devoting enough time to study? Were you having issues understanding the material? It's important to find out why so you can fix these issues and get the best grade you can achieve when you re-take the class.

WanderingWilder, ASN

Specializes in Med-Surg.

Even though its free I don't think I'd want to spend four years of my life getting a degree I know I won't use, just to try to get into a nursing program in four years. You are still going to have to take those classes ie anatomy to get into a nursing program so why not just do them now.

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