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How I had multiple offers as a New Grad RN in a saturated Market

Job Hunt   (9,428 Views | 21 Replies)
by Fitnessgal123 Fitnessgal123 (New) New

1,278 Profile Views; 10 Posts

Hello All!!

When I was in the hunt for a new grad RN position, I used AllNurses to help guide me in my job hunt endeavors and I want to take the time to help others who are looking for their first RN job.

I went to nursing school out of state to where I live currently. Knowing that I may have a harder time finding a job as a new grad, because of my out of state schooling, I thought to myself how I could make myself different and stand out compared to the rest of the applicants who would be applying for the same positions I eventually would be applying to. This school of thought really helped me snag my first job in a saturated market. Here is what I did:

background: I have a previous bachelors degree and completed an accelerated nursing program with above a 3.50 GPA. I also passed NCLEX the first time.

Me: prior to nursing school, I obtained CNA certification and worked in home health for a year and a half. During nursing school I volunteered at a clinic as a student nurse for ~10 months.

What you can do: CNA certification is easy to obtain and can be completed over a Summer break easily. So if you can do this, it is a bonus! You also don't have to work in a hospital to be a CNA.

I sought volunteering opportunities now matter how busy my schedule was with my program. I consistently volunteered at the clinic and built rapport with the staff and other volunteers. In the end, I advanced my nursing skills r/t assessing, documenting, giving report to MD, edu. Pt etc. I also walked out of there having an instant reference too. The main thing I realized when talking to recruiters is that having additional experience in a healthcare setting shows that you are comfortable being around patients.

Me: Prior to graduation I went to the state board of nursing website and figured out what was needed exactly to be eligible to sit for the NCLEX. I also compiled a list of hospitals in the city I would be moving to with HR phone numbers. I called every single hospital in the area and asked to speak with the new grad recruiter. Sometimes I got lucky and caught one on the phone. I asked them many questions and wrote down anything and everything they said. I also started applying to Nursing Jobs, even without my licensure it got my resume and name in front of HR recruiters. Apply apply apply

I also used used career services at my university to help me format my resume and cover letter. This was helpful because I was able to creatively format my resume that really made it stand out.

What you can do: make sure your ducks are in a row with your eligibility to sit for the NCLEX. Stay on the ball with I because each state has a different process and length of time for paperwork to be processed. Call HR in hospitals to start getting your name out there. If your university or college has a career services dept. they most likely have a resume or cover letter workshop that you can participate in that will really make your strengths stand out. Apply even if you're not qualified, I had a lot of phone interviews because HR recruiters found my resume in their databases.

Me: post graduation I scheduled my NCLEX as soon as possible. A lot of the hospitals in the big city where I live have new grad programs that require licensure by a certain date. I didn't want to put the test off because I wanted my licensure to add to my resume to be more competitive.

What you can do: take your NCLEX as soon as possible. Don't forget to keep applying throughout this stage too! Apply apply apply!! Call HR too!!

Me: interviewing for positions, I wore a suit and bought a portfolio w where I had multiple copies of my resume, cover letter, and references. I engaged them and took notes while they were interviewing me. I did my research on the hospitals and wove t that into my answers. I asked them questions, on average about 5 questions that I really cared to know. I was genuine, myself, and showed that I truly enjoy the nursing profession. I ended all of my interviews on a positive note.

I literally did all of this and I had 5 job offers. One of the hospitals I had offers from was a MAGNET status hospital. So, be diligent, market yourself, get experience, have a good GPA, work hard, and apply apply apply. This really made the difference. I kept applying for months before I was offered a multiple positions.

I hope this helps you and that you will be offered multiple positions as well!! Good luck!

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25 Posts; 1,664 Profile Views

Thank you and congratulations! This is very helpful and inspiring. Do you mind telling us the general locale where you did your Job Search?

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,555 Profile Views

Good job and strong work!

FYI no surprise about the Magnet hospital. In my area they are the easiest hospitals to get hired into since they have the poorest working conditions and highest staff turn over.

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flyersfan88 specializes in Trauma, Orthopedics.

449 Posts; 8,256 Profile Views

PMFB-RN said:
Good job and strong work!

FYI no surprise about the Magnet hospital. In my area they are the easiest hospitals to get hired into since they have the poorest working conditions and highest staff turn over.

That's not true where I live. I also live in a saturated market, but the hospitals that are the most sought after around here are also coincidentally magnet (University of Pennsylvania, Cooper, Jefferson, etc) and are notoriously great places to work. Not sure where the OP lives but I definitely wouldn't automatically correlate job offers to magnet status.

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255 Posts; 6,022 Profile Views

Great Story! goodluck on ur RN career!

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10 Posts; 1,278 Profile Views

I am so glad this helped you nt2002!!

I moved to the West to the Phoenix area!!

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IndiCRNA has 1 years experience and specializes in ICU, transport, CRNA.

100 Posts; 7,681 Profile Views

PMFB-RN said:
Good job and strong work!

FYI no surprise about the Magnet hospital. In my area they are the easiest hospitals to get hired into since they have the poorest working conditions and highest staff turn over.

I will second this. When I hear "Magnet" I write that hospital off as a potential employer. Among my friends and colleagues, all experienced ICU & ER nurses, many of whom have now gone on to CRNA school, Magnet = crappy place to work.

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10 Posts; 1,278 Profile Views

Thank you all for the congrats!! I hope this helps others find a job and opportunities!

Positivity and good vibes to those seeking employment as a new grad!!

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IndiCRNA has 1 years experience and specializes in ICU, transport, CRNA.

100 Posts; 7,681 Profile Views

flyersfan88 said:
That's not true where I live. I also live in a saturated market, but the hospitals that are the most sought after around here are also coincidentally magnet (University of Pennsylvania, Cooper, Jefferson, etc) and are notoriously great places to work. Not sure where the OP lives but I definitely wouldn't automatically correlate job offers to magnet status.

I heard from a friend who is in clinicals there that U Penn wasn't going to seek recertification. Have you heard that too?

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IndiCRNA has 1 years experience and specializes in ICU, transport, CRNA.

100 Posts; 7,681 Profile Views

OP you sound like a real go-getter who will have great success regardless of what you choose to do. Good job and thank you for posting your story so that others may learn and benefit.

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flyersfan88 specializes in Trauma, Orthopedics.

449 Posts; 8,256 Profile Views

IndiCRNA said:
I heard from a friend who is in clinicals there that U Penn wasn't going to seek recertification. Have you heard that too?

I work there and that is not true. All they talk about is the excitement around recertification of all 3 facilities (HUP, Presbyterian, and Pennsylvania Hospital).

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32 Posts; 1,957 Profile Views

As recent New Grad in the last year I can say that of all the things you listed, the CNA work experience was probably the most useful.

Anyone who is a Nursing Student should be working in the field already as a CNA or PCT, preferably at the hospital or facility that you would like to eventually work at. It opens doors that would otherwise be closed.

Every student from my class that was already working as PCTs got jobs working for the hospital they were at. Other students that were NOT working had difficulty even getting an interview.

Work experience is a big +++++++

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