Jump to content

How honest to be when quitting a job

Posted
by Caramarie Caramarie (New) New

I wanted to hear people's experience when it comes to taking to a manager/supervisor about quitting. I have only been at my current position for about 6 months and have really disliked it since about the 2nd or 3rd month. A new opportunity came up and I was offered a new job, at a better place, that is a unit I would much rather work on and I accepted.

Part of the reason I dislike my current job is our manager is kind of awful, is not fair, takes sides, and gives out different information to employees. She also does not seem to care about our unit at all (we're the smaller of 2 units she oversees). How honest can/should I be with her about my reasons for leaving? I don't expect to ever come back to this unit specifically, but hate to burn bridges.

Also, I'm required to give 3 weeks notice but have the opportunity to give 4 weeks. Has anyone ever been let go from a nursing job as soon as they turned in their notice?? I know it happens in the business world but I've never personally heard of a nurse being let go so quick since it's hard to find/train a new nurse to a unit.

Edited by Brian S.

I would not tell the manager that you are leaving the job because you do not like how she acts. Don't forget that you have to list her name as your supervisor on future job applications, so why get on her bad side on the way out the door? I can almost assure you that she would not take any constructive criticism to heart and change her ways anyway, so no sense in hurting yourself.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Never burn bridges. Some ways to say it:

I appreciate the opportunity this job afforded me in terms of developing my time management skills (or whatever this job helped you to accomplish) but I have an opportunity to move to a unit where I will be able to hone my critical care skills (or whatever the new job will provide).

I would give 4 weeks notice if you can....

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

You do not have to TALK to your manager about quitting. Follow your facility's protocol. You should be able to email your resignation to HR and cc NM from Hades.

If you get an exit interview, that would be the time to give YOUR review of NM from Hades.

If nurse manager from Hades will not let you complete your 3 weeks... take it HR.

You are lucky to get a new job...

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

Follow protocol and resign with as much notice as possible. There is absolutely ZERO benefit for you in telling your manager all the way she stinks at her job prior to you resigning or even afterward. If you get contacted by HR for an exit interview, that would be your opportunity to discuss it but even then I would use caution. Nursing is a small, small world. You do not have to give a reason for resigning.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

Follow protocol and resign with as much notice as possible. There is absolutely ZERO benefit for you in telling your manager all the way she stinks at her job prior to you resigning or even afterward. If you get contacted by HR for an exit interview, that would be your opportunity to discuss it but even then I would use caution. Nursing is a small, small world. You do not have to give a reason for resigning.

Yeah, many people have told me that venting during an exit interview is counter-productive, and not to trust HR.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Yeah, many people have told me that venting during an exit interview is counter-productive, and not to trust HR.

Venting in this case needs to be done. The powers that be DO want to know about toxic management, and it is the right thing to do.

I also trust HR as far as I can throw them, but if OP is not allowed to work her last 3 weeks, HR MUST be informed. Nurse manager from Hades would be in effect, firing her in advance of her end date . HR might be useful for a change.

Unless you are absolutely leaving the state, the country, or the industry, as tempting as it is, do not burn bridges. Maybe the hospital you're going to will be bought out by the current hospital. These are things to consider. You never know. Your mgnr sounds like mine. She knows what she's doing, what she's capable of getting away with, and that people like you will eventually leave and she'll just find a replacement. No use in telling her her faults when she is cognizant of it.

cyc0sys

Specializes in EMS, LTC, Sub-acute Rehab. Has 6 years experience.

I'd follow the appropriate protocol for sending your resignation to HR as everyone suggests. I'd let your UM or DON know you're leaving as a professional courtesy. Be vague as possible.

If your manager is as incompetent as you say, upper management is probably aware of it. They are probably choosing to do nothing about it or waiting for the right opportunity to replace her. Alternately, if they aren't aware of it, it means they're probably incompetent as well and you're just wasting your time.

Nursing is a small world unless you relocate to another state or coast. Others are most likely aware on what's going on with your facility/ manager already. No use to beat a dead horse.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

Unless you are absolutely leaving the state, the country, or the industry, as tempting as it is, do not burn bridges. Maybe the hospital you're going to will be bought out by the current hospital. These are things to consider. You never know. Your mgnr sounds like mine. She knows what she's doing, what she's capable of getting away with, and that people like you will eventually leave and she'll just find a replacement. No use in telling her her faults when she is cognizant of it.

Or maybe the person the OP plans to tell off will turn out to be her coworker at her new or another future job. Or worse, she'll end up being the OP's manager again at another facility. Think it can't happen? It most certainly can.

So, OP, while I understand your reasons why you want to be brutally honest, you may want to keep this in mind. If you insist on airing your grievances, use as much tact as possible...and remember that what you say could come back to haunt you.

Best of luck at the new job.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

When I left my hospital job 5 years ago, about 25% of our staff had left or were leaving. Several people did exit interviews with HR and specifically told them that our manager was the reason they were leaving. HR did nothing and this person received a promotion and is now director of the department. The unit is still a revolving door. I heard recently that people still go to HR complaining about her and they never do anything. Unless you are in a Union, complaining about your manager is not going to accomplish anything. Best to just move on and not burn bridges.

Just DO NOT DO IT.

There is absolutely nothing to gain. Probably the most compelling reason to give this type of feedback would be simply to "have your say" - but the smarter person knows that the smart thing to do is walk away. Misery loves company. Don't be the company.

Jolie, BSN

Specializes in Maternal - Child Health. Has 35 years experience.

I admire your desire to share your concerns in the hope/belief that they will be used to improve conditions in this facility. However, it won't happen. Administration knows the performance of your supervisor and has chosen to accept it. If they were serious about making changes, they would have already done so. Venting on the way out the door won't improve anything for anyone. It will just get you labeled as a whiner, and possibly not eligible for rehire.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I admire your desire to share your concerns in the hope/belief that they will be used to improve conditions in this facility. However, it won't happen. Administration knows the performance of your supervisor and has chosen to accept it. If they were serious about making changes, they would have already done so. Venting on the way out the door won't improve anything for anyone. It will just get you labeled as a whiner, and possibly not eligible for rehire.

Not true. I worked with an NM from Hades. Administration was aware what was going on, because NM was involved in 75% of grievances. She was eventually walked out the door.

We MUST report these issues. As with any problems.. documentation is the key.

DowntheRiver

Specializes in Urgent Care, Oncology. Has 7 years experience.

I've had it go down in both situations.

I left a job after 1.8 years due to crappy management. During exit interview, I reported my grievances; the manager was promoted and now oversees the territory! I also left this job due to scheduling and "needing weekends off to be with my husband who travels", which was my out in the open reason for leaving.

I left my state job after 8 months. I was honest about why I was leaving (hours + pay) but sad to leave my wonderful managers. I have an open invitation to come back any time (which I probably will heading towards retirement) with several recommendations.

If it is a manager gripe and poorly organized unit, I'd probably not be as upfront and honest. Is there something you can use, like some kind of excuse, like travel time, childcare, going back to school, etc?

FurBabyMom, MSN, RN

Has 8 years experience.

I agree with the others. Be careful not to burn bridges. Even though it seems impossible now, you never know when your paths might cross in the future. In general, health care isn't that big of a universe. It seems like everyone knows someone who knows someone who worked with someone else that and that someone is common to your life for complex reasons. The other reason I wouldn't be bluntly honest is that you don't want your current manager to make you ineligible for rehire. Again, it might not seem like it matters, but with the way health care systems are expanding, you never really know how this might affect you later, it's impossible to predict.

Now, if HR does an exit interview you can be honest without being unprofessional. You can cite work culture issues without being super specific and get your message across.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

DON'T DO IT!

In all my gazillion years working, I have seen just about every scenario that PPs have reported.

It will NEVER work out to your advantage.

Be civil with a "thank you very much" as you walk out the door.