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How do you command respect at work?

Posted

Has 8 years experience.

I am talking about coworkers' looking up to you as a leader and respecting you as a good nurse.

I would appreciate your input as I believe this is something I need to work on. Perception is everything, right? I have seen excellent nurses persecuted at work because they give the perception of being clueless and disorganized, when, if you look at their actual patient care, this is not the case. This has never happened to me, but I am interested in going one up and actually being looked up to by my coworkers.

I know the way one carries oneself matters. Do certifications matter? Committee participation?

Note that I am not talking about sucking up to management, rather, lateral respect.

Thanks in advance for your dialogue.

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

I admire any peer who demonstrate the following:

*Low-key, steady demeanor

*Always seems to be working. If her patients don't need her, she's helping someone else.

*Is always willing to answer questions/mentor the new nurses.

*Doesn't participate in gossip sessions.

Committee/organization involvement doesn't really impress me, although I should probably not admit that. I guess I've met too many nurses who cover up a lack of basic nursing ability/desire by hiding behind organizational activities.

I also guess I've never met a nurse who gave the perception of being "clueless and disorganized" yet was an excellent caregiver.

travel50

Specializes in LTC, geriatric, psych, rehab. Has 26 years experience.

I definitely agree with roser13. I don't care one bit what, if any, committees someone is one. I also have no respect for anyone who yells at co-workers (except for emergencies).

They must be able to listen.

They must be trustworthy. I cannot stand to be lied to.

They must show respect to others.

Calm and patient even under stress.

Kind to others when they don't know it is noticed.

And it is hard to be a good caregiver when you are clueless and disorganized.

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

I also think that consistency and honesty is important. Don't be afraid to say that you are not sure, you have to investigate before you answer. Integrity...be a person of your word. I had to call upon all of skills mentioned by the two above responders plus this when I was assigned to be a team leader (something that I really did not want to do, mind you) and it works so far.

showbizrn

Specializes in Behavioral Health, Show Biz.

a smile and introduction

upon initial contact

followed by an upbeat personality

and positive demeanor

and completion of my assignment

laced with the golden rule:

do unto others as you would like them to do unto you

treat others as you would like to be treated.

:yeahthat:

(i apprecaite gentle firmness so that's what i give)

:rcgtku:

Lacie, BSN, RN

Specializes in jack of all trades.

I admire any peer who demonstrate the following:

*Low-key, steady demeanor

*Always seems to be working. If her patients don't need her, she's helping someone else.

*Is always willing to answer questions/mentor the new nurses.

*Doesn't participate in gossip sessions.

Committee/organization involvement doesn't really impress me, although I should probably not admit that. I guess I've met too many nurses who cover up a lack of basic nursing ability/desire by hiding behind organizational activities.

I also guess I've never met a nurse who gave the perception of being "clueless and disorganized" yet was an excellent caregiver.

In full agreement!! Respect isnt commanded it is Earned! Never expect anyone especially your techs to do anything you yourself wouldnt get out and do yourself. Respect each other the same as you would expect others to treat you. Use a little sugar to draw those bees not salt! I've seen too many nurses who look at thier name badge and say "I'm the RN and shouldn't have to do those things" well guess what that is the furtherest from the truth. Very good question.:yeah:

I think respect is earned, not commanded. That said, I try to conduct myself in any work environment by doing the best I can under any given circumstances. Treat people fairly and kind of the "do unto others" motto. I've found that you earn respect by doing a good job, and lose respect by whining and complaining and cutting corners. I've never sucked up to anyone in the workplace, management or coworkers. There is no reason to do that, IMHO. Just do your job. I do recognize that a good ahrd days work can go unrecognized by management. If that persists, I also understand the need to find a position where hard work is recognized, even if only on your evaluation. I often tell new grads to reallytake a close look at the management of the unit where they are interviewing, and make sure you can work for that kind of a person/team.

How does one exhibit a calm and good demeanor?

canoehead, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 30 years experience.

In addition to all the others be ready to say that maybe you are incorrect, and then go look it up instead of just insisting. You could very well turn out being right, but that extra step earns you respect instead of resentment.

If you are a great nurse, but easily flustered, make sure you stock your rooms well, and you know where everything is and how to use it. Turn things on and figure them out when you aren't in a crisis and you'll look so competent and organized in an emergency your coworkers will swoon. For common crisis moments, like chest pain, initiate the standing orders, have the 12 lead ready, and meds in your pocket when the doc arrives.

I think also, in addition to all of the above, as a newer nurse, I've really had to call others on their disrespectful behavior. I have had to speak up. I use "I" messages, don't attack them, just attack their behavior, etc. and just VOICE it. I doubt I have made friends with these people, but they sure do leave me alone now and don't pull what they did before. My good friends I keep and I think that's about the best anyone can do.

I had an experienced male nurse decide to chastise me in the nurses station at change of shift in front of everyone for something I was passing onto him he didn't like. I approached him later and asked him not to do it again and to stop treating me like an idiot. I was pretty heated -- but kept it respectful. He hasn't done it since.

I think people will treat you how you let them. Don't let them. Usually it only takes one time to speak up and call them on it and they will stop.

I wish everyone could just be born being respectful, but some people just don't have the upbringing, the class, the skills to BE good communicators and to be respectful of others. They are often also very self centered. But they have to be TAUGHT that others DO matter and have a right to co-exist. I honestly don't know what's wrong with people myself.

Hmmmm.....

Learn about conflict management NOW

Have neutrality that rival's Switzerland

Do not participate in gossip (by the way, participating includes listening)

Know your stuff

Don't fake it...ever

Be direct

Be supportive

Only reprimand in private

Never panic/get hysterical it helps nothing

Have humility/be teachable

Learn how to take feedback like a pro

Learn to give feedback like a pro

Sonia,RN

Has 8 years experience.

When I said clueless and disorganized, I did not mean they ARE that way. They are not, but manage to come across that way to some. Easily flustered would be a better description.

Any specifics on body language, behaviors?

No eye rolling, deep sighing or making faces when one of your colleagues/subordinates walks in or is speaking in a meeting -- or ever. It is aggressive and rude.

Of course there is a ton more.

Why don't you find a solid leadership course?

diane227, LPN, RN

Specializes in Management, Emergency, Psych, Med Surg. Has 32 years experience.

Confidence, ability to deal with different situations in a manner that allows a positive outcome for everyone. Able to act as a resource. Calm and in control. Treats everyone with respect. They don't talk down to anyone. They welcome all new people in a positive manner. They introduce themselves to new people and let them know what they can expect from the charge nurse. They maintain accountability and stand up for the decisions they make. They never try to blame anyone else. Assist staff with procedures that they are not familiar with. They maintain a positive atmosphere at work and they don't get the "big head" like they know everything.

AOx1

Specializes in ER, ICU, Education. Has 15 years experience.

For me it is easier to pinpoint things that make me lose respect for someone:

If everytime you are assigned an admission, drama that rivals that found on Broadway ensues, I'm not impressed.

If you feel the need to whine continuously about everything and how you have it tougher than anyone, go away. It makes me want to put you out of your misery :)

If you are the kind who needs to compete verbally and try to "top" what others say (ex- a coworker has a headache and you feel a need to say "that's nothing, let me tell you about the time I...."), ok, already, you win. You truly take the prize.

If you feel a need to cry hysterically and defend yourself whenever things don't go your way, this might not be the profession for you. I don't have time to be your counselor, I am trying to keep my critical patients alive.

If you know it all and are an expert at everything, then why don't you share the wealth instead of just acting superior?

That pretty much sums it up for me. I like people who are pleasant, hardworking, and care about the patients.

Hmmmm.....

Learn about conflict management NOW

Have neutrality that rival's Switzerland

Do not participate in gossip (by the way, participating includes listening)

Know your stuff

Don't fake it...ever

Be direct

Be supportive

Only reprimand in private

Never panic/get hysterical it helps nothing

Have humility/be teachable

Learn how to take feedback like a pro

Learn to give feedback like a pro

I work as a cna, and am from Africa, of coz the accent when I go to the break room and I just don't listen or participate in gossip, they ask if do I think am better than them, then what?

I work as a cna, and am from Africa, of coz the accent when I go to the break room and I just don't listen or participate in gossip, they ask if do I think am better than them, then what?

Change the subject.

psalm, RN

Specializes in Staff nurse.

Re: Only reprimand in private. I prefer to do it in private...but have been told that sometimes you need to have a witness (ie, the aides are union but the RNs aren't).

No one likes to be corrected with others around.

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