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$8.25 an hour...*** is this normal?

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You are reading page 4 of $8.25 an hour...*** is this normal?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Specializes in Wound Care. Has 1 years experience.

avi8tor69

Specializes in OR-ICU. Has 16 years experience.

Lol...I am AWARE of my scope, as well as the art of delegation...and handling medicine is a "NO NO" for unlicensed personnel...Just like you think my ASSUMPTION of your respect for the scope is WRONG...please don't lecture me on scope of care, and what is WRONG...Again, my original post states what is in "scope" that is if FACILITY policy...ie "by the book." Again, your TONE sounds like you continue to undermine people with limited scopes, as well as the nurse who DELEGATE CORRECTLY...like myself...No adverse reactions, near misses, or lawsuits or license revocation because I HONOR MY LICENSE, as well as RESPECT MY TEAM...that is what being a part of a healthcare team is all about...working together WITHIN ACCEPTABLE SCOPE and FACILITY POLICY, NOT cutting corners...again, your comments are coming from a place of NO EXPERIENCE or inadequate experience respecting the healthcare team...you still have a lot to learn, in my opinion.

Why dont you re read your post. You are the one who insinuated that since one can learn a skill, its good enough for you if your around to watch them perform the skill. That was the gist of your argument. My argument was simple, a team member perform task that is within the scope of their work. Nothing more. You don't do anything that you weren't formally trained/educated or licensed to do. I never undermined anyone. You on the other hand, launched personal attacks instead of arguing the facts. Sigh....

avi8tor69

Specializes in OR-ICU. Has 16 years experience.

In my hospital it is allowed. CNAs otherwise known as techs insert foleys, start IVs, do EKGs etc in the ER and on some med surge floors. Under no circumstances would anyone but a nurse administer medication of any kind. On my floor we are too busy getting people up and down and up and down to do Much else...we don't even do vitals, although we can. Nevertheless, when a nurse wants to let me do something under her supervision I jump at the chance and it is not illegal.

"No day but today"

Your hospital allows CNA to start IVs, EKG, Insert Foleys etc? Wow.

Sorry aviator but I disagree. While the RN is who actually does the assessments' date=' the iv's, administers the medications, etc, the CNA in her "limited scope of practice" as you call it, is the one who gets her resident up in the morning for bathes, gets dressed, breakfast and morning activities, changes the bed, straightens the room, spends time with the resident and their family. The CNA has a connection that sometimes the RN doesn't even get to have because what they do is actually the limited part of the care. I'm not saying it is not important but it is true that most of the patient daily care is done by the CNA while the RN charts and takes care of other patients. Being a CNA opens doors in so many ways, deign with the patient, families, other CNA's, nurses, their institution, the way things are done, how Mary maybe like to bathe before bed and Becky likes to wear her pink scarf to the dimming room that night for dinner. How old Larry's grand kids are and how long until they visit again. The experience being a CNA brings is absolutely invaluable and no one can take that away from who has it. Then before bed her resident likes to say a prayer and loves that her CNA can be the one saying it with her. This is priceless. This CNA will become the best nurse because she sees her resident as much more than a patient but a family member and manages to give that kind of care to every resident she has to.[/quote']

I love it!

While I agree "practicing" things are a "no no" (as you said), lemme CLARIFY the scope of a CNA:

In fundamentals class, you practice ADLS, foley insertion, foley care, vitals, etc. As a CNA, my first job was in a community hospital's ER. I put foleys in using the sterile technique, EKGs, phlebotomy, even perfumed in codes (bagging and chest compressions), oral suctioning, point of care testing such as blood Glucose monitoring. Yes, a CNA can build upon their "scope" and based on the experiences of my CNAs, if they were competent in aspects of advanced care, I DELEGATED to them...and I still do. I'm not sure how long you have been in your nursing career, but from my "limited" scope of CNA to my "limited" scope of an LPN to a RN, I have been able to expand my scope based on my institutions that saw the value of a competent individual, and you will have plenty of people that you are going to have to delegate to, so please get to know them and RESPECT their experience, so you will be able to work as a team. As for the poster before you, I would have her help on my team. And if facility policy, if she is able to put in the foley, the by all means I would be in the room and be with the individual, have them "practice" with me, then, when I'm confident, I can sign off her competency...that's how effective delegation works. I rather uplift and help members of my healthcare team maximize their skills, especially if the facility allows...makes better patient care when team work is involved...and each time I have utilized delegation, there have been ZERO adverse effects, near misses or misses that effected the pt...they actually GOT BETTER. So SAFE effective DELEGATION can work.

Agree 100%!!!

Scopes of practice differs by state, and facilities. What is allowed in one state may not be allowed in another and the same goes for facilities.

I haven't met a person yet who said that they didn't benefit from having CNA experience helping them in NS. And those who are in NS now and those who are new grads and working at their first nursing job, who never had CNA experience said that they wished they did.

My mother has been a CNA for over15 years and worked numerous types of positions in healthcare all except nursing she is currently department head of medical records and central supply at a LTC facility and just with her background she is very knowledgeable about a lot of things. Ive witnessed RN's coming to her office asking her for help or advice about how to do their job. I'm currently in my second semester of LPN school and I get help from her about anything from procedures to care plans.

I think its insulting to assume that just because you know how to do something you dont know why! Delegating is making sure that they understand every aspect as well.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Scopes of practice differs by state, and facilities. What is allowed in one state may not be allowed in another and the same goes for facilities.

I haven't met a person yet who said that they didn't benefit from having CNA experience helping them in NS. And those who are in NS now and those who are new grads and working at their first nursing job, who never had CNA experience said that they wished they did.

My mother has been a CNA for over15 years and worked numerous types of positions in healthcare all except nursing she is currently department head of medical records and central supply at a LTC facility and just with her background she is very knowledgeable about a lot of things. Ive witnessed RN's coming to her office asking her for help or advice about how to do their job. I'm currently in my second semester of LPN school and I get help from her about anything from procedures to care plans.

I think its insulting to assume that just because you know how to do something you dont know why! Delegating is making sure that they understand every aspect as well.

^^^Thank You!!!

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Why dont you re read your post. You are the one who insinuated that since one can learn a skill, its good enough for you if your around to watch them perform the skill. That was the gist of your argument. My argument was simple, a team member perform task that is within the scope of their work. Nothing more. You don't do anything that you weren't formally trained/educated or licensed to do. I never undermined anyone. You on the other hand, launched personal attacks instead of arguing the facts. Sigh....

^^^Again, seems like the INSINUATION is coming from your own "tunnel vision" I NEVER stated ANY of what YOU have interpreted...again, the FACT is that you still have a lot to learn about delegation...WHY do you see it as a personal attack??? We are typing in a forum!!! Again, if it is STATE and FACILITY policy, the Nurse who delegates to healthcare member MUST observe FIRST...AGAIN IF they are able to complete the task ACCORDING to POLICY and WITHIN SAFE CARE, then they are allowed, and I would sign off...My emphasis is to help you UNDERSTAND. Which, again, sounds like you have new nurse "tunnel vision" based on not having previous nursing experience, which happens. LOL....besides, I'm not the ONLY one who thinks your viewpoint is offensive...your posts sound like a hint of projection perhaps?? Instead of you worrying about my insinuations, which are FALSE ask for clarification, to better UNDERSTAND. I'm over your lack of understanding. My point is, get to know your policy, LEARN to DELEGATE, RESPECT your healthcare TEAM then get back to me on what someone can't do...and as another poster says, we are not just in one section of a country, states, city...what I stated was based on MY experiences...just because I challenged you on something you felt you had knowledge on, does not erase the fact that what you wrote is base on someone who does not know how to delegate..Again, respond to me when you have ACTUALLY DELEGATED, then we can have a conversation about it...thanks! :)

Now, back to the OP instead of this discourse...:)

In IL we have to have our CNA as a preq before you can apply to the LPN or RN program. CNAs do back breaking work. I respect every aspect of the medical field. If I hv time I will toilet, lay down or feed a patient. I have no problem helping a patient or cna. I got into this business to help, not flaunt a degree. I hv enough credits to bridge to the RN program- just can't decide if I want to deal with the stress of school and the responsibility that follows being an RN, BSN etc.

^^^Thank You!!!

You're Welcome!! And Thank you as well!!

I think being a CNA has helped me. For one, I did not have to do a Basic Nursing Skills class.

My CNA class cost around $300; testing was a little more.

My university offers basic nursing skills...for a price. It is a 5-credit course. Now you do the math. Since nursing school costs $400 per credit hour...multiply that by 5, and you'll be shelling out a whopping $2k for a class that won't even let you sit for your state CNA test. Not only that, but the class didn't even have a clinical portion. So theoretically...most of my classmates don't know how to change a brief on an actual person.

Yes, it is blood pressures and ADLs... But it is also up to you to take initiative and observe everything you can. Your learning is what you make of it!

A lot of nursing schools require applicants to be CNAs. At least my school did. I was a CNA for 4yrs then a nurse. I use those skills everyday. Sure I learned them in nursing school but my CNA experience made me a better nurse.

In response to whoever was saying they can't get calls back, I have to say, I spent weeks sending in online applications only to eventually call the places and find that they didn't even get them. The best thing to do it go through Google and write down all the addresses to facilities you can potentially work at, visit each one and fill out a job application in person. I spent a week going around town and physically walking into places and had 4 calls back within 3 days. Seriously, it works.

Also, I live in the middle of nowhere in Ohio and the first place that called me back was a nursing home and offered to start me at $10.15/hr with no experience and no GED... I'd continue looking if I were you, you deserve more than that with all the qualifications you've got.

AM326

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 2 years experience.

In IL we have to have our CNA as a preq before you can apply to the LPN or RN program. CNAs do back breaking work. I respect every aspect of the medical field. If I hv time I will toilet, lay down or feed a patient. I have no problem helping a patient or cna. I got into this business to help, not flaunt a degree. I hv enough credits to bridge to the RN program- just can't decide if I want to deal with the stress of school and the responsibility that follows being an RN, BSN etc.

first of all I have to say that is amazing. I wish our state pushed on pre reqs for nursing is a CNA license, it just makes sense. I worked at a LTC and out of the 8 nurses in my wing...only 2 actually went out of their way to help me or any of the other CNA's. That's because they started as a CNA themselves and knew how hard it can be at times. I think it's important for many if not ALL of the nurses to start as a CNA and work up...you seem to appreciate them more when you are a nurse :3 Now to get back to the topic itself, when I started as a CNA I got 8.75 w/ no experience. I live in TN, it was low even in my area...so for them to offer you 8.25 w/ no benefits...and you have experience?...It's an insult.

Why not try to work as a PCT at a hospital?... That's what I plan on doing :3 Working as a PCT is different from Hosp to Hosp. Many of the PCTS do the regular turning, feeding, toileting, and Bathing, but then there are some that will trin to on EKG's, Telemetry, and Phlebotomy :D You get paid more (Avg starting wage is about 11-13-depending on what unit and training/experience) and you just need your CNA :D

I wish you the best and I hope you find a pos in healthcare so you can use your CNA skills!

Alisonisayoshi, LVN

Specializes in LTC.

The school I really want to attend pre-req's a CNA. In California. I also know, from research in MY COMMUNITY, that the likely hood of getting a job is increased with patient care experience. I enjoy being a PCT. I love my residents. I work in a psych ALF. I feel like I'm learning how to deal with patients in a caring way. I think that's possibly one of the most valuable skills one can have. I learn so much from my nurses. I feel like they are models for behavior and professionalism. I can learn procedures in nursing school. I'm where I am to learn grace, kindness, and dignity (for my patients).