Jump to content
Additional Hardware Upgrades Read more... ×
Toreylogan17 Toreylogan17 (New Member)

Help! Pre-MSN?!?! Is there a point?

Pre-Nursing   (590 Views 11 Comments)
22 Visitors; 5 Posts
If you find this topic helpful leave a comment.
advertisement

Hi everyone! I'm desperate for some insight and advice!

I graduated with my Bachelors of Science in Exercise Science. I was thinking PT or PA but have decided that's becoming an NP interests me way more! There is a 2-year program where you can get your MSN/CNL with any Bachelors degree/without being an RN. I was told this makes the most sense as it would be pointless to get another Bachelors, and having a Masters would put me closer to my end goal, NP. I would be able to sit for the NCLEX at the end of this program as well to get my RN.

Im wondering if there is anyone that has done this program who can give me insight? I assume it's harder than a regular MSN program because you're also taking classes to become an RN on top of the Masters degree classes. I have a 2 year old and am a single mother. I understand free time will be non existent, but will I be able to work at all? I have daycare and a decent support system, but his father has no custody, so I wouldn't have extended periods of kid-free time outside of getting babysitters for x hours. I also have to pay bills to keep a roof over our heads.

Is this possible at all? Am I better off waiting until he's older and more self sufficient? I really would prefer to do it now instead of being out of school for years... ANY advice from ANYONE with experience in nursing programs would be much appreciated!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that I would have to continue on after this to become an NP. They just suggested that I go this route to get my RN since I already have a Bachelor's degree, as an MSN would put my farther ahead than a BSN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would look into NP programs in your area and see what they require. I was considering a similar path due to having my bachelor's in another field. However, upon looking at the NP program in my city, it is a DNP program which you can enter into with a BSN. So for me it makes more sense to save the extra money that the MSN program costs vs the BSN and just get a second bachelors. The only issue is that financing a second bachelors degree can be hard and usually requires private loans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's actually a really good idea.... lol..... this is why I need outside advice hahah I just took what the advisor from my college said and figured it was the only way! Thank you so much, I'll be looking into that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also beware of any BA-to-BSN/MN program without a clinical component, or that requires you to find your own clinical experience. I did a BA-to-BSN in 18 months, and knowing what I know now...I wouldn't do it again, nor do I advise people who really want to learn nursing to do so. Because of the clinical component. You may get "enough" clinical hours for the program but that did not necessarily translate into enough clinical experience. Best of luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A MSN in leadership won't get you any closed to NP than doing a BSN, and will likely cost more. A traditional BSN can be done as a post-bach student in 18-24 months (depending on if the program runs through summer or not) as you'll only need core nursing classes, and accelerated BSN in 12-16 months. Given your need to continue working and limited support I'd advocate for the traditional BSN as this spreads the cost out over more terms, and tends to have a little bit more time available for working than an accelerated program. You'd still be an RN in two years (same as the MSN/CNL program) and likely with less debt. The only advantage to an MSN-entry program is if you have exhausted undergrad financial aid and were planning to finance your studies through federal aid (in which case the next degree needs to be higher than a previously earned degree). However, given how much more expensive graduate tuition it may still not be worth it. Traditional ASN and BSN degrees tend to be much more affordable than ABSN and MSN programs and it is possible that as a single mom you'll meet criteria for aid or scholarships other than federal grants and loans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting a non-clinical MSN won't really help you get there faster. Most school's limit the number of credits you can transfer in (if they match their curriculum exactly), so you are looking at a 3-4 class advantage for a lot of extra money. You won't get paid any differently either.

You could do an accelerated BSN in about 18 months. That might actually be a quicker route for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would definitely say go for the entry msn! I did the second bsn route, and now 5 years later want to go for np, but the msn component is alot longer of a program for a bunch of fluff leadership courses.

The second bachelors is very similar to the ms entry. There are 3 core courses: advanced assessment, adv patho and adv pharmacology. These you may need to take when u eventually start the np, but the rest is stuff that u just "need" for the msn and will save you time later.

You will start nursing the same: a new grad with a bsn or a new grad with an msn. As far a work at this point you will be at the same skill level, but when u get experience and decide you are ready for the msn you will be thanking your lucky stars to have that msn already!

That has been my experience!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The counselor I've been speaking with also seems very attiment that i go this route (hopefully not just because they will make more money off of me). Do you know/think that the MSN will be much more demanding than the BSN? I was also thinking that the MSN would help me to stand out for job applications, as id love to work in a private office and have a regular schedule as soon as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you know/think that the MSN will be much more demanding than the BSN? I was also thinking that the MSN would help me to stand out for job applications, as id love to work in a private office and have a regular schedule as soon as possible.

No. It won't make you more in demand.

My view is that MSN/CNL is a massive waste of time and money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×