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Graduate Nurse, but treated as an Aide

First Year   (3,224 Views 14 Comments)
by rplumback rplumback (New Member) New Member

582 Profile Views; 5 Posts

I graduated from nursing school the first of May, and took my boards the end of May. I was working with an RN, learning the ropes, until I didn't pass my boards. Now I have to wait 45 days, and during this time, all my hospital will let me do is Aide work. Talk about feeling like a red-headed step child! I am still working at my aide pay until I pass boards. Does anyone else work in a backwards place like mine? Needless to say, I've been applying to other area hospitals that will employ me as a GN and pay me the RN wage. Thanks!:confused:

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ukstudent specializes in SICU.

805 Posts; 8,670 Profile Views

You need to talk to your BON. Your hospital is correct. You are no longer a graduate nurse since you took the boards. From that point on you are either a nurse (passed) or someone that is allowed to work at the tech level (failed). In states that allow GN's it is for a limited time period only, such as for 90 days or until nclex.

Forget trying to go to another hospital, they can't hire you as a GN either. If you lie and do not tell them that you have failed the nclex and work as GN, the BON will find out and when they do they will never allow you to sit for the nclex again.

The best advice that I have, is to swallow your pride and keep working at the hospital. At least you can be learning some things as a tech and you will have a job when you pass next time.

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AnnieOaklyRN is a BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in ED, Pedi Vasc access, Paramedic serving 6 towns.

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Hi,

I agree with the other poster. you do not have a choice, but to work at the aide level. You are allowed to work as a new grad only until you take your boards, and if you fail them than you are no longer concidered a graduate nurse as far as work goes, and this is per the state not your hospital.

In other words by failing your boards you void your temporary grad nurse license...

Keep your chin up though and you will pass next time

Swtooth

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5 Posts; 582 Profile Views

Another hospital just 15 minutes from here has a GN that that took her boards 5 times before passing and performed her duties as an RN, with only RN's signing off on her signature. No one ever told us that once you take boards and don't pass, you loose all your priveleges. What makes you any different the day after taking the test, then the day before (other than a pass/fail)?

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56 Posts; 1,584 Profile Views

i dont know what state youre in, but here in PA the procedures your hospital followed would be correct. If you dont pass boards, you arent a GN anymore, and all you can do is aide work until you pass the boards.

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cardiacRN2006 is a ADN, RN and specializes in Cardiac.

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No one ever told us that once you take boards and don't pass, you loose all your priveleges. What makes you any different the day after taking the test, then the day before (other than a pass/fail)?

You lose all of your GN priveledges once you take the NCLEX, regardless if you pass or fail.

What makes you different? Once you take your boards, you are either a nurse, or you aren't. That's just the way the rules were written. Otherwise, people who are never capable of passing (not meaning you) could work as GN until the cows come home.

My state doesn't even have GN status. I couldn't even start work until I had my license in hand.

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 103,405 Profile Views

The other posters are all correct. "Graduate nurse" status dates from the days when boards were only offered twice a year, and it took 6 weeks to 2 months to get results back. Depending on when you graduated from nursing school (esp. if it was any time other than the "regular" May or June graduation), it could easily be four to six months before you were licensed. Since the advent of the computer-based, schedule-whenever-it-suits-you NCLEX, some states have officially done away with GN status entirely. Some still allow it, but it is a hospital's choice whether to hire new grads on that basis -- they are not required to offer GN employment to new grads. Many hospitals have chosen to stop hiring on that basis, even when the state BON allows it, because it's too much hassle to keep up with everyone taking boards at different times.

GN status is a privilege based on the assumption that you are going to pass boards when you take them. Once you take the NCLEX and don't pass, you are, legally, the same as any other person who doesn't have a nursing license -- you cannot be employed as a GN and cannot legally perform any duties that require a nursing license. If there is a hospital near you that is doing this, both the hospital and the "phony" GN(s) are at risk of being in serious trouble with the law. It is illegal, plain and simple, for both the employer and the would-be nurse(s).

Your employer is doing you a favor (as most hospitals do in this situation, since they've already invested quite a bit in hiring and orienting you) by offering you a CNA position until you pass boards rather than just firing you. I realize it's not a pleasant situation for you, but plenty of other people have found themselves in the same boat and survived. Good luck with your next attempt at the NCLEX!

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caroladybelle is a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/Haemetology/HIV.

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The other posters are all correct. "Graduate nurse" status dates from the days when boards were only offered twice a year, and it took 6 weeks to 2 months to get results back. Depending on when you graduated from nursing school (esp. if it was any time other than the "regular" May or June graduation), it could easily be four to six months before you were licensed. Since the advent of the computer-based, schedule-whenever-it-suits-you NCLEX, some states have officially done away with GN status entirely. Some still allow it, but it is a hospital's choice whether to hire new grads on that basis -- they are not required to offer GN employment to new grads. Many hospitals have chosen to stop hiring on that basis, even when the state BON allows it, because it's too much hassle to keep up with everyone taking boards at different times.

GN status is a privilege based on the assumption that you are going to pass boards when you take them. Once you take the NCLEX and don't pass, you are, legally, the same as any other person who doesn't have a nursing license -- you cannot be employed as a GN and cannot legally perform any duties that require a nursing license. If there is a hospital near you that is doing this, both the hospital and the "phony" GN(s) are at risk of being in serious trouble with the law. It is illegal, plain and simple, for both the employer and the would-be nurse(s).

Your employer is doing you a favor (as most hospitals do in this situation, since they've already invested quite a bit in hiring and orienting you) by offering you a CNA position until you pass boards rather than just firing you. I realize it's not a pleasant situation for you, but plenty of other people have found themselves in the same boat and survived. Good luck with your next attempt at the NCLEX!

Agree with this.

Most nursing schools teach you this.

And many hospitals would let you go or fire you after failing Boards.

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12 Posts; 744 Profile Views

Not to be harsh, but you ask what is the difference between the day before your NCLEX and the day after? The day before it's assumed you will pass based on national pass rate averages. The day after no assumptions are necessary, you've demonstrated that you did not pass the NCLEX (for now). If the NCLEX is a test of competence, and you fail it, you can see how the hospital you're working for can not continue to allow you to provide RN-level care.

That said, people fail their NCLEX and it isn't that they aren't competant RNs, it just may mean they aren't great test takers. So stay the course and make the best of it and know that many, many GNs who fail the NCLEX in the country are in the same boat as you - working as an aide waiting to re-test.

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ashley_michelle specializes in Trauma/Stepdown, CCU.

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I graduated last may.. took my boards June 6th and failed. My hospital allowed me to work as a Nurse Extern until I was able to retake my test. After that time period.. I was demoted to an aide. So, when I was able to.. I retested and passed. The nurse extern wage was inbetween an aide and a nurse.. about the same or more than LPN's.

Good luck and keep studying!

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NRSKarenRN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.

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Not to be harsh, but you ask what is the difference between the day before your NCLEX and the day after?

The day before it's assumed you will pass based on national pass rate averages. The day after no assumptions are necessary, you've demonstrated that you did not pass the NCLEX (for now). If the NCLEX is a test of competence, and you fail it, you can see how the hospital you're working for can not continue to allow you to provide RN-level care.

This is correct. Many nurse prctice acts have language such as PA's:

The practice of nursing in Pennsylvania without a valid Pennsylvania TPP or license is illegal and prosecutable.

The TPP expires immediately when the results of the first licensing examination are received. The TPP must be returned to the Board of Nursing office and employment as a graduate nurse must cease if the permit holder fails the first licensing examination. http://www.dos.state.pa.us/bpoa/lib/bpoa/20/nurs_board/tpp_for_graduate_nurse.pdf

Please visit our NCLEX discussion forum for support in passing this test.

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CarVsTree specializes in Trauma ICU, MICU/SICU.

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Another hospital just 15 minutes from here has a GN that that took her boards 5 times before passing and performed her duties as an RN, with only RN's signing off on her signature. No one ever told us that once you take boards and don't pass, you loose all your priveleges. What makes you any different the day after taking the test, then the day before (other than a pass/fail)?

It doesn't matter what state you're in. You are working under a temporary until you take your boards. If you pass, you're obviously an RN, if your temporary practice permit is null and void.

Here's the language on my void temp practice permit:

Type: Graduate Registered Nurse Permit Secondary Type: N/A Number: TGRNxxxxxxxx

Profession:

Nursing Status: Null and Void

Obtained By: Application

Issue Date: 1/11/2006 Expires: 12/31/2006 Last Renewed: N/A

Standing: This license is not in good standing based on the license status 'Null and Void'.

Disciplinary action history: No disciplinary actions were found for this license.

Once you pass boards or fail boards, your license is null and void.

How do you know that someone is practicing nursing without a license at another hospital? That just makes no sense at all.

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