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Grading in Nursing School?

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Specializes in ICU + Infection Prevention. Has 9 years experience.

Is it mostly based on tests? Essays? Problem sets? Research Papers? Practical evaluations?

How is it distributed?

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

It depends on whether you're attending a ADN, BSN, MSN, doctorate, diploma, or accelerated program.

I'm enrolled in an LPN-to-RN (ADN) program, where my entire theory grade is based on the scores I receive on the tests. My entire clinical rotation grade is based on the points I receive on the care plans that I submit. The heavy-duty research projects are typically reserved for BSN, MSN, and doctorate programs.

I should also add that any score that falls below 77 percent in the program that I attend is considered a failing grade. Some of my former classmates were forced to withdraw from the program after having achieved an overall score of 76.4 percent.

Here's our grading scale:

77-85% = C

86-92% = B

93-100 = A

It depends on whether you're attending a ADN, BSN, MSN, doctorate, diploma, or accelerated program.

I'm enrolled in an LPN-to-RN (ADN) program, where my entire theory grade is based on the scores I receive on the tests. My entire clinical rotation grade is based on the points I receive on the care plans that I submit. The heavy-duty research projects are typically reserved for BSN, MSN, and doctorate programs.

I should also add that any score that falls below 77 percent in the program that I attend is considered a failing grade. Some of my former classmates were forced to withdraw from the program after having achieved an overall score of 76.4 percent.

Here's our grading scale:

77-85% = C

86-92% = B

93-100 = A

:yeahthat:

In general, though, in any nursing program, you're going to be graded on a wide variety of activities -- clinical performance, written projects, objective exams, classroom presentations, maybe classroom participation, etc. How the grades are determined and weighted should be clearly explained in each course syllabus.

And lots of people are v. surprised to find that grades work differently in nursing programs than in general academics -- in most programs, anything below a "C" is failing and gets you put out of the program. The actual numerical scale may vary somewhat from school to school, but I've never encountered a school where you could get below a "C" and not have to at least repeat the course, and, in most cases, you flunk out and may or may not be allowed to reapply later.

Our classes are scored mostly on quizzes and tests....including a final and a HESI. Clinicals are P/F, not graded.

Here's our grading scale:

80-85% = C

86-92% = B

93-100 = A

And for our school and most of the schools I have read about, they DO NOT round up! I lost my A in psych because I only got an 85% on the HESI....my overall grade was 92.73% SUX! But, it is what it is. A 79.999999 will get you a failing grade.

SummitRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU + Infection Prevention. Has 9 years experience.

I'm looking at BSN programs. I'm used to anything below an 80% being unacceptable, so not worried there, I just hate writing lots of long papers.

Quizes, Tests, practical exams, presentations, I can do well at all those. Papers drive me insane.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Papers drive me insane.
Well, it might be comforting if I told you that the longest paper that I've ever had to write in any of my nursing courses are the one-page APA format summaries that I must submit with every care plan.

However, I attend an ADN program. Since you are aspiring to attend a BSN program, you may have to endure writing academic papers. I can almost assure you that they will need to be submitted in APA format, as most nursing programs generally do not accept the MLA format.

Our classes are scored mostly on quizzes and tests....including a final and a HESI. Clinicals are P/F, not graded.

P/F is still a grade -- you either get a "Pass" and move forward in the program, or you get a "Fail" and (in most cases) don't. It's just a different grading scale than the didactic courses. :)

Edited by TheCommuter

I'm looking at BSN programs. I'm used to anything below an 80% being unacceptable, so not worried there, I just hate writing lots of long papers.

Quizes, Tests, practical exams, presentations, I can do well at all those. Papers drive me insane.

BSN programs typically involve quite a bit of writing, including research papers. If that's really an issue for you, you might want to look at ADN programs. However, if you want to pursue further education in nursing later on, you'll still have to write.

I am in an ADN program and we must write one Paper in our first Block APA format (she says they are usually 12-20 pages) plus do an Oral Group Presentation. We have homework for Pharm and lots of exams plus the HESI at the end of the block. Our clinicals are also Pass/Fail on our techniques in the facilities and several care plans. Our scale is similar to all of the others posted.

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

In my school we have 2 grades for our classes with clinicals basically, the actual class is made up of tests and we get an A B or C A=94% to 100% B=85%-93% and C=77%-84%

Our clinical portion where we have the care maps and journals etc etc and clinicals are all pass or fail.

Our classes like Pharm are strictly exams and same grading scale as above.

I'm in a BS program. 55% of my grade is from clinicals. It's taken from writing assignments (one being a 30+ page paper this term) and clinical performance (graded using a clinical rubric).

45% is from theory class, exams and papers for the most part.

Peace,

CuriousMe

At my school it's tests/quizes. A couple of classes have project type stuff but that will be over after this quarter. Clinicals and practicals are P/F and don't factor in to the grade other than that you have to pass them or fail the class.

melmarie23, MSN, RN

Specializes in L&D/Maternity nursing.

I am in an direct entry (accelerated) MSN program. I am currently working on one of many final papers, a nice 10-12 pgr for my Public Health class.

I have had papers in every single class so far. For my Theory course, papers were our only grades. Same with Public Health and Research (which will now be ongoing as we lead up to our quality improvement project or Thesis-whichever we choose to do) For most other courses, it was a combo of papers and tests/quizzes. My only classes where our grades were strictly based on tests and/or quizzes was Fundamentals, Med/Surg, and Maternity/OB. Pedi we have tests and case studies, which are like mini papers. Same with Patho/Pharm, Geri and Psych.

Our clinicals we are graded on our skills and reflective journal entries. We've had a few quizzes during some clinical rotations, but not all.