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Got Told I am Slow in Receiving Report

Hello, I am a new grad and just got off orientation for about a month now. My manager told me today that she heard from other night nurses that I am slow in receiving report. I was surprised by that comment because I thought I was doing fine. I don't know why the other nurses told her that. We all use the same sbar sheet to fill out during reports and we go through the form from top to bottom. Makes me feel like I am not doing good and it has been a difficult couple of weeks for me since now I am on my own and this comment makes me feel worse. I have been stressed out at my job in trying to manage my time and handle caring for 6 patients. I hope things will get better in the future but I don't know. Any advice on how to adjust after orientation and how to develop better as well in my critical thinking skills as well as tips in how to handle those comments?

Thanks,

Hmm, slow in receiving report? Maybe because you are new or maybe you take your time to really listen to and understand what is being said, so that you can safely care for your patients. :)

Edited by RN403

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

You're a new grad just off orientation. You might not LIKE hearing that you're slow receiving report, but I'm willing to bet there's a kernel of truth in there somewhere; perhaps even a big one. As a new grad, you WILL make mistakes. There WILL be things you can do better. There is always room to improve, but never so much as when you're a new grad. Take this criticism, learn from it and grow. Seek out more criticism because that might be the ONLY way you learn what you're doing wrong. The other nurses probably said something because they're hoping to help you grow in your practice, and for some reason or another, they don't see you as being open to criticism. That's a problem -- the only way you're going to hear about ways you can improve before your manager does is if your colleagues see you as wanting to hear their input.

How can you be slow at receiving report? As in asking too many questions or...?

I've heard of grads being slow at giving report but never receiving..

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

How can you be slow at receiving report? As in asking too many questions or...?

I've heard of grads being slow at giving report but never receiving..

Asks too many questions about information that would be given later in report? Insists on having the off going nurse repeat everything over and over so she can write everything down word for word? Isn't ready for report at the crack of 7? Doesn't listen well, asking questions that have already been answered?

I've known plenty of new grads guilty of all of the above. I was one of them, probably.

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty.

I think the best way to handle remarks like that is to forget about your hurt feelings and develop an attitude that lets your co-workers see you as a professional who is willing to learn. I know, it stings to know that they commented to your manager rather than to you.

It happened to me a long time ago when several people met with our charge nurse on my day off.

You have the potential to turn this into an opportunity to gain their respect.

dexm

Specializes in ICU, ED.

Honestly, I think it's a little petty that your manager mentioned that to you. I'm sure you probably are slow at getting report (which seems appropriate because you have only been off orientation for a month), but is it really worth mentioning? I give report to people who I would consider to be "slow at receiving report," but I don't think its a big deal. It just seems like they're trying to be thorough. Yeah, sometimes it's annoying when I'm trying to get out of there after a long shift, but to me it doesn't matter as long as that person is doing their job and doing it right.

My advice: don't write every single thing down the off going nurse says during report. IV access? Yes. How they pee? Yes. The pt's entire past medical history the nurse briefly runs through? NO. Those are things you can find out for yourself by reading the chart. Also, my biggest pet peeve when I give report to floor nurses when i'm transferring my patient out of the ICU is when they ask 1000 questions about things I haven't gotten to yet or asks questions that have already been answered. I'm going to tell you what IVs they have and what their BP has been, just chill and let me get to it. Save your questions for the end and just listen.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia.

Be proactive: Ask the day nurses (I'm assuming you work nights from how I read your post) to be specific about HOW you could be faster in report. Show you are willing to learn. THAT gains respect, and gives them an opportunity to teach.

Best wishes, new grad-dom is hard!

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

Things to consider that might contribute to their saying this:

Do you come in early to search through the patient's chart for labs and to pull your meds before you get report? Chances are they see you there and expect because you are there early you will absolutely be on time or even a smidge early sitting down to receive report. If you linger too long on these tasks, past the point where you should have started getting report (at my place of employment it is at 6:45, not at 7:00), it prolongs their wait and is super irritating.

Do you interrupt the report with questions? There is a new grad on our floor who is constantly interrupting during report. It is almost a control issue with her. I finally told her to let me finish before she asks questions. Her interruptions made it far more likely I would forget something important and made my own thought process chaotic.

Are you looking things up in the computer while the person giving report is trying to give you details instead of writing down what he/she says?

Are you asking to have things repeated or asking about things the offgoing nurse just told you because you aren't fully paying attention and/or have not gotten your own shorthand version in order?

Are you lingering at the computer or over your notes before going to the next nurse to get handoff? Are you making people wait for you or have to hunt you down?

Are you asking for details on things that you could easily look up for yourself?

Honestly "slow in receiving report" sounds to me as if you are late getting there or too slow in moving from one nurse to the next so that they can get out of there. Whatever it is, fix it and nobody will even remember this was an issue. If you can't figure it out, ask for details.

Edited by not.done.yet

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia.

Another thought- do you have a report sheet with enough detail before you start? For example: Under 'vitals' is it blank or do you have 'Q2H' and Q4H' pre-printed so you can just circle and go on?

See what I mean? Putting the most common stuff pre-printed on your brain sheet can save a LOT of time in addition to the above poster's VERY helpful hints.

Hi

I have been there; my charge nurse in my LTC said that I am extremely slow on passing med. :) on my first week. Just laugh it off and hang it there.

Lennonninja, MSN, APRN

Specializes in MICU - CCRN, IR, Vascular Surgery.

Another thought- do you have a report sheet with enough detail before you start? For example: Under 'vitals' is it blank or do you have 'Q2H' and Q4H' pre-printed so you can just circle and go on?

See what I mean? Putting the most common stuff pre-printed on your brain sheet can save a LOT of time in addition to the above poster's VERY helpful hints.

This is what I do. I have pre-printed sheets with the most common medical history diagnoses, assessment info, frequency of labs, basically anything you could think of I already have pre-printed so I can listen during report and just circle things. It's really great for me.

vintagemother

Specializes in Med-Surg, Psych, Geri, LTC,.

My first thought was the OP was slow to give report, but then I reread it...slow to receive?

If the original poster is asking the off going nurse to go slow enough so she can write things down verbatim,

If she isn't ready to receive report at the crack of 7,

Etc... Then these may be a problem. It would be nice if her supervisor would have given her specific, constructive feedback.

When I float to a particular unit at my job, the regular FT nurse waltzes in a few minutes after the shift begins. She Starts her coffee, settles in, them when she finally allows me to start shift report, she asks for report on not only my shift, but the prior 2 shifts. She asks the most trivial questions about things that didn't occur on my shift, so she can write them down. I have to restrain myself from saying, "can you read?" Because she can read the same 24 hour log I'm reading from.

I'm pretty sure it's some kind of power struggle to try to ask me a question I can't answer (from a shift I didn't work)

I think she thinks she's making me look dumb by asking lots of weird random questions, but I think it makes her look foolish, not me.

I wanted to mention this because it's not necessarily a "new nurse" thing, though it could be.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

Asks too many questions about information that would be given later in report? Insists on having the off going nurse repeat everything over and over so she can write everything down word for word? Isn't ready for report at the crack of 7? Doesn't listen well, asking questions that have already been answered?

I've known plenty of new grads guilty of all of the above. I was one of them, probably.

Oh, I definitely was one of them.

OP: do not take such criticism as a personal affront. Instead, see it as a chance for self-improvement. Take an honest look at how you are at report and see what can be improved. Or ask someone that you are comfortable with to give you their feedback. Because their POV will be more objective, they may see something that you are missing/overlooking.

Trust me, in the grand scheme of things, being a little slow in report as a new grad is minor. No one's going to care or even remember 6 months down the road...provided you've addressed any issues, of course :)

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