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Going to be fired?

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by Meridian2 Meridian2 (Member)

Meridian2 has 3 years experience .

1,449 Profile Views; 27 Posts

You are reading page 7 of Going to be fired?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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i know that I have a lot to work on and I am not going to make the mistakes again. But i think everyone is blowing it all up and im not that bad. I dont waste 15 minutes of people's time every evening that only happened once. She said she is not going to fire me so I will do better and prove it.

Don't post on the internet asking people questions and then post your unhappiness over getting replies that don't agree with you.

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72 Posts; 2,773 Profile Views

I work in a SNF that has a LTC side (two hallways=60 pt total) and a subacute/rehab side (also two hallways, 60 pt total). There seems to be no difference in acuity level. All of these pt have IVs, piccs and midlines, Shiley caths, wound vacs, trachs, surgical incisions and drains, IV ABT, hip fractures, neck fractures, back fx, g-tubes.. Literally no difference in workload or required skill level when I float to either side. day and evening shift has 4 floor nurses and a supervisor. That means floor nurses get 30pt each. Except at night, floor nurses get 60+ each. we also only have 4 CNAs in the whole 120bed facility at night. So rehabs and subacute are not always better than LTC, not where I am anway. Always do research before accepting a job.

18 patients is a very good ratio for just PO and injections.

When I was still in home care I was sent to supervise a patient at an LTC for the night.

Two wings, 20 pts each. 1 CNA and 1 nurse per wing.

When I noticed two other pts in the same sleeping quarters I saw deep pressure ulcers on both.

Some of these LTCs are terrible and I fear pts do not get repositioned frequently enough. I like sub-acute, with the wound vacs, trachs, tubing everywhere, and isolation. Plus it's TBI rehab so throw in violent and confused behaviors into the mix.

As Pen mentioned I'd shop around. Ask people questions. I prefer an atmosphere with higher acuity and fewer patients.

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NanikRN specializes in Oncology, Rehab, Public Health, Med Surg.

392 Posts; 7,840 Profile Views

THIS. I call shenanigans. This can't be a real person.

I believe this too. Cannot/ willnot believe this is teal

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1 Article; 1,769 Posts; 17,453 Profile Views

OP, what it boils down to is that you are struggling with your job and making excuse for it. Now you are being childish and unprofessional by arguing with the people who are trying to help you. You need to grow up and take a long hard look at yourself.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,949 Posts; 172,642 Profile Views

Its that your pity full way of saying sorry? You are a liar yes you did say I would kill icu patient. It's in writing go look. I am a lot older then you I have wisdom and critical thought you dont you dare tell me how to be a better nurse and handle my stress after the hurtful words you said. I don't need to self diagnose myself with adhd to gain sympathy

You may be older, but you seem to have quite the deficit in accountability, critical thinking, time management and wisdom. Pay attention to the responses your original post elicited. You have gotten some wonderful feedback but . . . You. Still. Don't. Get. It.

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Jensmom7 has 36 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1,907 Posts; 11,400 Profile Views

When I was still in home care I was sent to supervise a patient at an LTC for the night.

Two wings, 20 pts each. 1 CNA and 1 nurse per wing.

When I noticed two other pts in the same sleeping quarters I saw deep pressure ulcers on both.

.

Just a slight side track, then back on topic.

You were supervising another patient, not these two. How did you see "deep pressure ulcers" on them without turning them, which you shouldn't have been doing, by the way, since they weren't your patients.

Your profile says you're a CNA, and now you may possibly be a student.

If you aren't a nurse, you have no frame of reference, and therefore can't offer any observation/thoughts/criticism etc, that would carry any weight with those of us who actually walk the walk.

OP IS a dangerous nurse if what she has said is true. She's been suspended, she may be terminated. She's not a new nurse, so your NETY nonsense is invalid. She doesn't like the responses she's gotten, so she has attacked other posters without really taking any responsibility for her actions ("I'm sorry" just doesn't cut it here).

Quite frankly, I've been doing this long enough that I no longer have too many cares for healthcare workers like you or OP.

Everyone makes mistakes, but when it becomes a pattern then you need to go.

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

6,504 Posts; 51,428 Profile Views

When I was still in home care I was sent to supervise a patient at an LTC for the night.

Two wings, 20 pts each. 1 CNA and 1 nurse per wing.

When I noticed two other pts in the same sleeping quarters I saw deep pressure ulcers on both.

Some of these LTCs are terrible and I fear pts do not get repositioned frequently enough. I like sub-acute, with the wound vacs, trachs, tubing everywhere, and isolation. Plus it's TBI rehab so throw in violent and confused behaviors into the mix.

As Pen mentioned I'd shop around. Ask people questions. I prefer an atmosphere with higher acuity and fewer patients.

Off-topic & irrelevant to a nursing discussion.

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 320,113 Profile Views

I only got orientation for 2 weeks and it wasn't enough im afraid.
Two weeks of orientation in LTC is extraordinarily generous. In the neck of the woods where I live, 3 days of LTC orientation is the norm.

I have 18 patients!!!
18 patients/residents is an extremely light load in LTC, especially on evenings. The typical evening shift LTC nurse has 30+ residents and manages to get the medications passed to all of them within a 2 to 3 hour time frame.

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bugya90 has 9 years experience as a ASN, BSN, LVN, RN and specializes in Ambulatory Care-Family Medicine.

560 Posts; 8,317 Profile Views

Its that your pity full way of saying sorry? You are a liar yes you did say I would kill icu patient. It's in writing go look. I am a lot older then you I have wisdom and critical thought you dont you dare tell me how to be a better nurse and handle my stress after the hurtful words you said. I don't need to self diagnose myself with adhd to gain sympathy

Technically no one said you "would kill ICU patient" and definitely not Pen so back off. I said I pray you never kill any patient due to negligence. If you continue down your current path this may very well become a reality and I never want ANYONE to kill a patient.

Your age has nothing to do with this. Your lack of knowledge regarding proper medication administration and accountability is the problem here.

Side note, ADHD is a real medical condition not some sort of sympathy card.

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95 Posts; 1,882 Profile Views

Your comments about ADD being a make up disease are disturbing. My daughter has struggled with this "make up" disease for years and it is a struggle. I feel you lack accountability or compassion for other people. Night nurses do not have more time to do things. We are shorter staffed and have to think on our feet. Most people go downhill at night too so you are constantly having to be on your toes and watching them. I usually don't comment on these posts but this one bothered me tremendously. Please take a long look at yourself and grow up.

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Here.I.Stand has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro.

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no the hospital is going to give me more hours when a position opens in icu.they only have one patient so it will be a lot easier

Oh brother. :eek:

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72 Posts; 2,773 Profile Views

Just a slight side track, then back on topic.

You were supervising another patient, not these two. How did you see "deep pressure ulcers" on them without turning them, which you shouldn't have been doing, by the way, since they weren't your patients.

Your profile says you're a CNA, and now you may possibly be a student.

If you aren't a nurse, you have no frame of reference, and therefore can't offer any observation/thoughts/criticism etc, that would carry any weight with those of us who actually walk the walk.

OP IS a dangerous nurse if what she has said is true. She's been suspended, she may be terminated. She's not a new nurse, so your NETY nonsense is invalid. She doesn't like the responses she's gotten, so she has attacked other posters without really taking any responsibility for her actions ("I'm sorry" just doesn't cut it here).

Quite frankly, I've been doing this long enough that I no longer have too many cares for healthcare workers like you or OP.

Everyone makes mistakes, but when it becomes a pattern then you need to go.

I'll explain it to you.

The LTC in question is known for not being a good one, hence the high rate of pressure ulcers. More often than you know patients from there come to my hospital because people there can't seem to get it together when it comes to repositioning patients. The LTC facility would keep four patients in a long room, with only small sheet to separate each patient. My patient was on the end, furthest from the door. Meaning, you had to walk down the room. There were no curtains to prevent me from seeing the other patients in those quarters, and the patients were on their sides with no clothing on their bottoms. I could see from over four feet away a deep ulcer the width of a nickel.

I may not be a nurse, but I work with exceptional nurses. This includes a team of wound care specialists. I am not only in nursing school but will be specializing in that field. I've been to enough speeches by wound care nurses and doctors to know what a stage two pressure injury is.

Don't you ever talk to me about a frame of reference again. Leave your ego at the door the next time you consider talking down to someone. I've seen plenty of egotistical nurses think they're above others yet make mistakes because they think they know it all, and I've seen them fired.

If you think an experienced CNA who works closely with nurses and is in nursing school can't possibly offer up any sort of experience in regards to the field of nursing then you my dear are both arrogant and ignorant, and I'll be happy to remind you of it each and every time you take that tone with me.

Some nurses do eat their young. I have seen it. Meridian isn't that new, but maybe so if that's in comparison to someone with over 20 years of experience. Could she have softened up? Sure. Could you all have softened up? Sure. She is frazzled. Upset. It doesn't take a genius to see some of these digs. Do you really want this website to be known for its hostility when people going through tough times are looking for help? Tact could go a long way.

Edited by Wake88

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