What's the reason for a RN to be snippy to a new post op pt. ? - page 8

OK. I don't want to fluff any feathers. I'm simply trying to get an opinion to experienced nurses and try to see this from the nurses point of view. I'm a nursing student so my POV is still very... Read More

  1. by   momofqc
    well if you don't want to discuss it you don't have to read or post. That's the great thing about the internet. I started another thread because it's asking a different question...again...if you don't like it don't read and respond. It's that simple.

    I understand being HUMAN BEINGS...but we have to realize that our attitudes and moods are a part of how well our pt does. Do you get upset when someone that is taking care of you whether it be in the grocery store or restaurant or what not , isn't personable or even rude? I bet so.

    perhaps my post has made someone else think twice about how they want their pt's to respond to them.....for that simple fact....I'm ok with fluffing a few feathers.


    With all that being said I would like to say that I respect each and every one of you as a Nurse and a woman. I know this is one of the toughest professions there is. Thank you for all you do for mankind.
  2. by   leslie :-D
    momofqc, i am not endorsing the nurse's actions.
    in my original post, i stated it was inappropriate...
    and whether we (as nurses) support such shabby behaviors or not, it is still going to happen.
    from hereonin, if you truly believe that a nurse treated a pt poorly, then you grieve it (in writing) to the nurse mgr.
    if you are so inclined, you have every right to bring the offending nurse aside, and share your concerns (as another poster did.)
    if your story is accurate, then yes, the nurse was insolent.
    we should never take our stressors out on the pt.
    however, if a pt/family does get out of line, you as a nurse, have every right to enforce strict limit-setting.
    big difference betw that particular intervention and being downright rude.

    you have sooooo much to learn.
    and while you reworded the title of your thread, it would still benefit you to read what these vet nurses wrote.
    we can learn from almost anything...
    and sometimes we are best served by keeping our ears open and mouth closed.
    best of everything to you.

    leslie
  3. by   RN1982
    I've never sniped at familes before but I sure have enforced the rules such as chairs and visitation and bediside stays over night. I do it in the best interests of the patient not because I'm mean and heartless. People misconstrue that often because they don't understand what our job entails. When I take care of a patient who is profusely bleeding from their chest, I want to be able to focus on them until they are stable, not the family. When the patient is stable, then I will shift part of my focus to the family.
  4. by   momofqc
    leslie,

    I agree with everything you said. Everyone can learn from every situation. I know that in nursing I have soooo much to learn....if I didn't then I wouldn't need to continue my education. The great thing about the internet is you can get insight from many different perspectives. I know I've gained insight from the vet nurses perspectives and I'm sure at least one person reading this gained insight from a different perspective. This can only make us better human beings.
  5. by   BrnEyedGirl
    I have spent the last 3yrs on night shift in a busy ER trauma center. I must admit that I have been "snippy" on occasion, and honestly felt it was appropriate for the situation.
    IE,...19yr old male pt "just minding my own bussiness when these two dudes jumped me". It's 3am,.the pt is very intoxicated and 3 teenage girls show up with 4 children under 3yrs. The ER is packed, 40 in the waiting room. All 3 girls are also obviously intoxicated, pt has already been to CT (neg) and been sutured and cleaned up,...sleeping off the ETOH so he can get home.
    Girl#1 sitting quietly at bedside,....girls 2 and 3 along with 4 small children decide to get comfy on a hall bed. Two of the small children are running up and down the halls. I need that hallbed for a pt. The kids aren't safe running the halls. I walk by the hallbed to ask a nurse about an empty bed for an ambulance that is 2min out.
    Girl #2 on hallbed (whom I wasn't even looking at) stated very loudly "go ahead and make some noise kids, if we P&%# them off enough they'll let us F***** get out of here". I ignore her and cont my conversation with the other nurse. Girl #3 adds to the loud trash talk.
    I very calmly turned and explained that A) you guys need to lower your voices and watch your mouths B) you need to go to the waiting room because you're on a bed I need for a pt.
    Both girls consider this a challenge,..spouting off about "right to freedom of speech" and other nonsense. They both threatened to "kick my little white A$$" because of course they have rights. This got ugly real fast and of course security was there in two seconds with guns. Yes I got snippy. Yes they deserved it. No, I don't feel bad about having them arrested and hotlining them for having 4 small children in a car while they were intoxicated!
    Asking for warm blankets when I'm busy gets a totally different response BTW
  6. by   momofqc
    Quote from TurnLeftSide
    I've never sniped at familes before but I sure have enforced the rules such as chairs and visitation and bediside stays over night. I do it in the best interests of the patient not because I'm mean and heartless. People misconstrue that often because they don't understand what our job entails. When I take care of a patient who is profusely bleeding from their chest, I want to be able to focus on them until they are stable, not the family. When the patient is stable, then I will shift part of my focus to the family.


    I would expect if a pt is profusely bleeding from their chest that the focus better be on them!!!! That's what I would want for myself or a family member no matter what...but this was a case where the pt. was stable. There is a way to enforce what ever policy or rules there are without being rude. The results are much better for everyone.
  7. by   momofqc
    Quote from RN-Cardiac
    I have spent the last 3yrs on night shift in a busy ER trauma center. I must admit that I have been "snippy" on occasion, and honestly felt it was appropriate for the situation.
    IE,...19yr old male pt "just minding my own bussiness when these two dudes jumped me". It's 3am,.the pt is very intoxicated and 3 teenage girls show up with 4 children under 3yrs. The ER is packed, 40 in the waiting room. All 3 girls are also obviously intoxicated, pt has already been to CT (neg) and been sutured and cleaned up,...sleeping off the ETOH so he can get home.
    Girl#1 sitting quietly at bedside,....girls 2 and 3 along with 4 small children decide to get comfy on a hall bed. Two of the small children are running up and down the halls. I need that hallbed for a pt. The kids aren't safe running the halls. I walk by the hallbed to ask a nurse about an empty bed for an ambulance that is 2min out.
    Girl #2 on hallbed (whom I wasn't even looking at) stated very loudly "go ahead and make some noise kids, if we P&%# them off enough they'll let us F***** get out of here". I ignore her and cont my conversation with the other nurse. Girl #3 adds to the loud trash talk.
    I very calmly turned and explained that A) you guys need to lower your voices and watch your mouths B) you need to go to the waiting room because you're on a bed I need for a pt.
    Both girls consider this a challenge,..spouting off about "right to freedom of speech" and other nonsense. They both threatened to "kick my little white A$$" because of course they have rights. This got ugly real fast and of course security was there in two seconds with guns. Yes I got snippy. Yes they deserved it. No, I don't feel bad about having them arrested and hotlining them for having 4 small children in a car while they were intoxicated!
    Asking for warm blankets when I'm busy gets a totally different response BTW

    Well, I would expect a nurse to do that if there are unruly and belligerent people running around. I'm glad you know the difference between the situations!
  8. by   RN1982
    My point is, is that there are family members who are distracting to the point of "All eyes on me". I've been there and done that. It gets old. That's why when I have a sick patient such as the one I posted, I make family wait in waiting room until I am ready for them to come back. Yeah, I will admit I've been snippy, especially when I've explained visitation, "Please ring the buzzer to let the secretary know you are here, please don't walk back because we could be in the middle of a situation"....family members do that repeatedly, walk right back, don't ask if its ok. I've had a family member walk in while I was bathing the patient and I sure sniped at them about the rules and that they need to step out in to the waiting room until I say its ok to come back. And I sure didn't feel bad about it.
  9. by   traumaRUs
    Will merge these two threads per OP's request.
  10. by   momofqc
    Quote from Mulan
    Maybe snippy, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder.

    Maybe this makes some think twice about how their attitude would get optimal results and cooperation from pt's and families. There's more than one way to enforce policy and rules. And of course, how could pt's and families and yes even nursing students know what the job of an RN entail? Does an RN know what the job of a NP entail completely? Of course not. You can't expect people to understand it because they don't live it. It would be totally unfair to expect anyone other than another nurse to understand.
  11. by   momofqc
    Quote from TurnLeftSide
    My point is, is that there are family members who are distracting to the point of "All eyes on me". I've been there and done that. It gets old. That's why when I have a sick patient such as the one I posted, I make family wait in waiting room until I am ready for them to come back. Yeah, I will admit I've been snippy, especially when I've explained visitation, "Please ring the buzzer to let the secretary know you are here, please don't walk back because we could be in the middle of a situation"....family members do that repeatedly, walk right back, don't ask if its ok. I've had a family member walk in while I was bathing the patient and I sure sniped at them about the rules and that they need to step out in to the waiting room until I say its ok to come back. And I sure didn't feel bad about it.


    I understand being short with a family member after there was a valid and reasonable explanation.
  12. by   cherrybreeze
    Honestly, what kind of answer would you like? It certainly seems as if you are looking for something in particular, so if you can be more specific, it'll be easier.

    Do you WANT specific examples (if anyone feels there are any)? Do you want everyone to say, no, it's never ok? I am on the side of, "no, it's never ok," but having read your other thread also, I know that's your opinion of the nurse's attitude and I wasn't there. You used the word "insisted" when you talked about your mom (again) asking for another chair. I might get "snippy" too. The biggest problem (for lack of a better term) with having family members present constantly is that the patient worries more about their well-being than his/her own. They feel the need to entertain said family and remain engaged in conversation, and they don't get the rest that they should (no matter how many times the family tells the patient to rest/sleep and not worry about it, the patient doesn't, and I know this from being the PATIENT and not the nurse........when I had company, I felt like I should be awake and engaged).

    You have your opinion about how the situation went down. You have made it abundantly clear that no one is going to change your mind, so to try to act like you are working towards a different/better understanding is transparent. Take it to that hospital's higher-ups if you are that concerned, otherwise let it go. You only respond by going off on tangents that are for the most part unrelated (who really cares if the gas station guy is rude, that has nothing to do with anything).

    Your agenda is crystal clear, and while this nurse *may* have had a crummy attitude and not been *compassionate* enough for your liking, nothing here is going to change it now. It's not making me do anything differently, because I'm not that nurse. If anything, use the experience in your OWN practice, once you are a nurse, and call it a day.
  13. by   ghillbert
    As I said, learn to speak up and say "Hey, I'm not sure why, but you really sound annoyed - is there something wrong?". 99.99 percent of the time, the cranky person will say "Oh sorry, I have been doing .... or ... happened" etc. Often it's just not about you.

    Of course dismissing someone's pain is not right. Noone said it is. You seem to be missing a couple of points:

    1. Everyone agrees, based on your post, that the nurse was in the wrong. No question.
    2. You asked for REASONS why the nurse may have been cranky - you got them.... end of story.

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