Start nursing school with a newborn at home? - page 2

Hi, Thank you all for reading! I have just decided not to attend a Johns Hopkins nursing program that begins in June, due to financial reasons. Since I was intending to go there, I turned down all my... Read More

  1. by   Nurse Beachbum
    You can do all things through Christ who gives you strength...Phillipians 4:13, that's how I got through school with two small children! Good luck with what you decide!
  2. by   Sterren
    Of course you CAN do it.

    Personally, I would not. A tiny baby at home takes up a lot of time. If you want to breastfeed, you need to consider where and when you would pump in clinicals and at school. You need to consider the (lack of) sleep you'll be getting at home, and whether you'll learn at the pace required in an accelerated program. You need to consider the choices you'll have to make between spending time playing peek-a-boo with your baby or studying for the exam you have tomorrow.

    My advice is to have a baby and wait a year to go to school. Then you'll have a toddler, which is still crazy difficult in nursing school but way more sane than having a newborn in nursing school.

    Good luck. This is a really hard decision to make, I know.
  3. by   LinzyRN
    I had a 8 month old when I started pre req's and she was three when I started in the nursing program. It has been very hard. I was gone all day at school and clinicals, but when I was home I had to study. I never got to spend time with her. Thank the lord I had lots of help from my husband and mom, but a newborn is a lot more demanding than a 3 year old. She is now 5 and I am officially a graduate nurse today! I would def wait until after school, but that's just my two cents.
  4. by   LuvofNursing
    Quote from Linz09
    I had a 8 month old when I started pre req's and she was three when I started in the nursing program. It has been very hard. I was gone all day at school and clinicals, but when I was home I had to study. I never got to spend time with her. Thank the lord I had lots of help from my husband and mom, but a newborn is a lot more demanding than a 3 year old. She is now 5 and I am officially a graduate nurse today! I would def wait until after school, but that's just my two cents.
    congratulations linz09!!
  5. by   kitti419
    School is not bad if your pregnancy goes well, but it is kind of hard to concentrate on un-baby related things. Once you have the baby it's going to be a whole different ballgame! Having a support system like family and friends you can rely on will make a huge difference. Life will be much less demanding without a baby. You may find that you never want to leave the little bundle! It kind of depends on your situation, ie, whether or not you will need to work, who can help you out. I will say this: neither of my children were planned and they are 6 years apart. My baby just turned 6 mos and I am (planning) NS in the Fall. While I dread putting him in daycare, I know that school is temporary and this is ultimately to better our lives...BUT, even if you have perfect angel children like I do, they still are incredibly needy, and there is a good chance your husband will be needy, too, and may be resentful when you need to study. You might feel guilty about pawning off the baby on others yet again... The important thing is that you set yourself up for success. Stress = bad. Get your support network of family and friends together and put it out on the table for discussion. Good luck!
  6. by   Nurseless in Seattle
    No one even mentioned how you might feel after birth... It's possible that you will not feel like your old self since your body will be recovering from giving birth. Some women get post partum depression. If you try to do both baby and school, you would be a new student and a new mom plus you also need to tend on your role as a wife. If you are still in your twenties, I think that you should finish nursing school first as fast as you can then have the baby.
    But if you are a little older then have the baby first then do nursing.
  7. by   firstyearstudent
    I found out I was pregnant shortly before being accepted to nursing school so I put off school for two years and did not regret it one bit! You will have to spend so much time on school work and they are little for such a short time. I don't think it would in any way be wrong for you to go to school when the baby is so little, but you will be missing a lot.
  8. by   kmarie724
    I too had baby fever bad when I started nursing school. I wanted to try to get pg despite my plans to start school, but my husband convinced me we should wait. Once I got to the point where if I were to get pg the baby wouldn't be born until after I finished school, we stopped trying to prevent pregnancy and I got pg right away. My dtr was born literally days after I finished school (our last day of class was Dec. 5, 2008, she was born Dec 9, 2008) and I proudly attended my pinning cermony with my 3 day old baby in the audience.

    I am glad I waited. Even though it was tough being pg while in school, it was doable. But I was blessed with an easy, relatively uneventful pregnancy. But I don't know that I could have managed a newborn and school. I planned to study for NCLEX while on maternity leave (I even naively packed my NCLEX review book in my hospital bag!), but I was so exausted the first 6 weeks, taking care of the baby and myself took every bit of energy I had. I didn't even open my NCLEX review book until she was 2 months old.

    That being said, there were a few gals in my class that did have babies while in school and they managed to make things work. One thing that continues to amaze me in my motherhood journey is my ability to find strength and energy I didn't know I had to make things work for my family. Living on no sleep doesn't seem so bad when I know I'm doing it for my dtr.

    Good luck with whatever you decide. I know how baby fever can take over your life.
  9. by   hillarypeace2006
    Even in the best of circumstances the rigors of nursing school, not to mention an accelerated track will result in sacrifice. I cannot emphasize too much how differently your feelings are after motherhood. There is a physical longing that I cannot explain that occurs and does so well into infancy.

    I have a two year old and six year old and even though I am only gone two days during the week (all day) and two full weekend days (12hrs), one has to account for time to study and time to relax. Enjoying a new baby should be done without the strain of scheduling, not to mentio the unforeseen illnesses and numerous first doctors' appointments that can more than overwhelm the daily schedule of new moms. A girl in my cohort was two clinicals away from finishing the semester and boom, the baby arrived early and so now she finds herself even further away from her finish line and with a baby that is not well.

    There are many things to be considered outside of just desiring a baby.
  10. by   Baloney Amputation
    Quote from hillarypeace2006
    Even in the best of circumstances the rigors of nursing school, not to mention an accelerated track will result in sacrifice. I cannot emphasize too much how differently your feelings are after motherhood. There is a physical longing that I cannot explain that occurs and does so well into infancy.
    You said that so well. I didn't realize how strong the longing would be until I had my first baby while I was in nursing school. Fortunately I was done with the LPN part, but I never went back for the RN portion, even though that was my intent in the beginning. I just couldn't be separated from her that soon.

    I did go work out of the house when she was 3 months old until she was fairly close to 3 years old, but it was uncomfortably difficult for me to leave her with a near stranger in the form of daycare.

    I still feel so strongly this way that this is one of the reasons I work at home now, even though my youngest is not a little baby anymore. (She's 3.)

    To the OP--If you find that you still have plenty of spare time after you start nursing school, that might be a good time to start trying to conceive.
  11. by   NurseCard
    It would be hard, but not necessarily impossible. I had a baby right in the middle of my 3rd semester of nursing school, and managed to finish that semester and finish the following semester and graduate.

    HERE'S THE THING: it might not have been possible had it not been for my husband's parents. They kept the baby a LOT while I went to school, and my husband worked; then I worked on the weekends.

    So, in my opinion, it's really important to have good family support in place... or not even necessarily family support, maybe friends that would be willing to help out with the baby.

    Good luck!!! I think you can do it.
  12. by   Harparia
    In the first class of the accelerated program I am in, we had to cover 30 chapters (1800 pages) in 4 weeks, plus a care plan, a group presentation, an academic paper, as well as find time to study for weekly quizzes and the final.

    Just something to consider.
  13. by   cclem1
    It's an incredibly difficult decision and sometimes when thinking about when to have a child, you realize that the time will never be right, so maybe you should just let nature take its course.

    But, here is my situation; I have two kids, and was about to begin an accelerated nursing program this past fall (2008) with a 2 year old and a 6 month old. The program was full time evenings, so I was planning on being home with my kids during the day and my husband having them at night. I do not have much in the way of support where I live, besides my husband. The program was also going to cost more than $65,000. So, one week before I was going to start, I backed out. And I am so incredibly happy I did. Though I could have done it (you can do anything) it would have been HELL. My baby didn't start sleeping through the night until 12 months and with everything else, I would have been stressed beyond belief. But, I was sad to not start school at the same time.

    So, I began applying to Associate programs, and was accepted for this coming fall into an evening program that will take two years. Even still I have mixed feelings about it. I feel like if I start this fall, then that seals the deal that I'm not having any more kids. Additionally, I think it's still going to be insanely difficult because my husband is also in school. It's so hard to know what to do, so I understand where you're at. I really do. I still don't know what my future holds right now.

    I think the reality is, it is better to get nursing school done BEFORE you have kids, but you have to follow your heart. If you get school done, then you can have your kids and not worry about classes and clinicals and studying. If you have kids now, you will be in for a million more obstacles, but you will have a baby you will love more than anything you can imagine. Anything at all is possible.

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