Quick Question

  1. Say for example you're an RN and you have a broken arm that's in a cast. Are you allowed to work? Or would you be sitting at home not getting paid?
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    About Seagate

    Joined: Jun '08; Posts: 86; Likes: 20

    10 Comments

  3. by   Straydandelion
    You would need doctor's permission slip given to HR to work with full duties/partial duties along with the date you would be allowed to start in the facillity where I worked.
  4. by   roser13
    That's a facility-specific question. The biggest issue is whether or not there's a limited-duty position available and whether the restrictions placed on you by your MD can be honored in that position.

    Your example is a great example of the need to purchase Short Term Disability insurance.
  5. by   superkyky
    I would guess that you you be put on light duty...
  6. by   Midwest4me
    Quote from roser13
    your example is a great example of the need to purchase short term disability insurance.
    exactly! with our insurance programs at our hospital, short term disability pays you 60% of your gross wages---that's better than nothing, i say! you're even better off if you've racked up enough sick hours so you can use sick time to get fully paid while recuperating. so many of the employees at our hospital use their 8 hours' sick time earned each month as soon as the first of the month arrives; i always wonder what those folks do when a serious injury or surgery occurs and they need 6 weeks(240 hours) off.
  7. by   showbizrn

    check with your hr department
    to clarify
    whether you're eligible for
    light-duty or
    short-term disability.

    my facility
    does not have light duty,
    so the nurse functions
    at 100-percent capacity or
    is off-duty for
    short-term disability at
    a portion of the nurse's salary.

    blessings in your search. :d

  8. by   Pepper The Cat
    I think a lot of factors would have to be considered
    1 - dominent or non-dominent hand?
    2 - location/type of fracture
    3- unit you work on.
    4 - MDs orders.

    One of our physio broke her wrist but was able to work with the cast on because it was her non-dominent hand. She managed fine.
  9. by   Jolie
    Quote from Pepper The Cat
    I think a lot of factors would have to be considered
    1 - dominent or non-dominent hand?
    2 - location/type of fracture
    3- unit you work on.
    4 - MDs orders.

    One of our physio broke her wrist but was able to work with the cast on because it was her non-dominent hand. She managed fine.
    What are the infection control implications of a hands-on caregiver working with a cast on the hand? Is it possible to adequately clean the cast between patients?
  10. by   Blee O'Myacin
    Just a thought - the cast itself would be a germ magnet. What if you were on full duty and got your cast soiled when cleaning up a patient? Even if you can get a glove over the cast, there is still the issue of not being able to wash your entire hand too. Like the others said, this is something between you and your doctor and HR. I hope you heal quickly!
    Blee
  11. by   Nurturer3
    Depends on the facility you work for. In my hospital no nurse can be placed on light duty. You can only return to work at 100% capacity. In the meanwhile you use up your vacation time, then short term disability kicks in at 60% of your base rate.
  12. by   hikernurse
    We wouldn't be allowed to work with an arm cast due to infection risk. We'd have to use our short term disability/sick leave hours. A cast on the leg would be fine. That's the scary thing; you never know when something will happen to prevent you from working .

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