prepackages NS syringes and ports access

  1. our hospital is trying to tell us to use the prepackages NS syringes (states on the package not to use on sterile field) to access implanted ports. Does any one do this, and how do they do this and maintain a sterile huber needle for access. Thank you
    Last edit by lsimm on Apr 17, '05
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    About lsimm

    Joined: Apr '05; Posts: 3

    10 Comments

  3. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from lsimm
    our hospital is trying to tell us to use the prepackages NS syringes (states on the package not to use on sterile field) to access implanted ports. Does any one do this, and how do they do this and maintain a sterile huber needle for access. Thank you
    I've always found that to be a tough situation. Ideally, we help each other (just happened the other night) I was not the accessor- so I put the saline flush on the needle and tubing as the sterile glove wearing nurse held on to the needle. I work in peds, so usually we need an extra pair of hands when accessing. But honestly, you could use your non sterile hand to do it, as you're only using your dominant hand to access.

    I hate those syringes- great in theory, but why the heck are they non sterile????
  4. by   NurseyBaby'05
    If you unwrap them and drop them on the field are they then considered sterile? I can't remember weather it's just the packaging that is non-sterile or the outside of the syringe.
  5. by   Gompers
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    If you unwrap them and drop them on the field are they then considered sterile? I can't remember weather it's just the packaging that is non-sterile or the outside of the syringe.
    The outside of the syringe isn't considered sterile either.
  6. by   NurseyBaby'05
    Ok. You jogged my memory a bit. I wonder how hard or expensive it would be to make ones that are sterile.
  7. by   bixby
    Our prepackaged NS syringes are not considered sterile so cannot be dropped onto the sterile field. However, my hospital now has found prefilled NS syringes that are in a sterile package and come two to a package. Very
    nice for accessing ports. When we only had the other prepackaged syringes, we had to go back to the old method of drawing up saline in syringe from vial maintaining sterility.
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  9. by   suzanne4
    The inside of the syringe is sterile, so that the fluid itself remains sterile, but the outside is not. This also happens with some specimen containers, and the same thing with actual IV bags. They can never be dropped on a sterile field, yet, I have witnessed residents do it over and over again. We have to either cover that area or change out everything. Many assume that because the fluid is sterile, so is the entire bag. IV tubings are another, for years, they were not sterile, especially when they came in the boxex, they had to individually wrapped and sterilized at the facility.

    If using Huber needles for access, best bet is to have sterile syringes for that, they are available pre-loaded, and use the cheaper non-sterile ones for routine flushes.
  10. by   ProfRN4
    [font="courier new"]i've seen port-access kits (at one of my hosptials) that include 10cc syringes, needles, and normal saline vial, all presumably sterile. so you don your sterile gloves, and go about making a flush the same way you normally would, but you (and your supplies) are sterile!! it's an extra step, but it maintains sterility.
  11. by   DutchgirlRN
    I truely appreciate this information. I've never had to access a port in the hospital. Do you believe it? 30 years! Anyway I already know that this issue will come up in HH. I never thought about the NS syringes in the cellophane wrappers not being sterile. Thanks so much for the heads up and info from everyone. :bowingpur
  12. by   Thunderwolf
    Moved to General Nursing Discussion forum.

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