Most Pressing Issues in Nursing Today - page 7

Was listening to a podcast that said "Within your area of expertise, find a problem and begin to solve it. When you begin doing that, you will begin to find happiness and purpose." In Post Modern... Read More

  1. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from OldDude
    So now that the cat is out of the bag I submit there isn't anything else to talk about so how about we let this thread reach it's omega. However, recognizing you are a "last word" individual I invite your last word so we can put this thread out of its misery. Amen
    No last words.. we were played.

    My suggestion was ...best not to feed it. Should be interesting to see what the mods do, up to them to shut it down, and let us save some pride.
    Last edit by Been there,done that on Mar 7
  2. by   pmcgrady
    Quote from Been there,done that
    No last words.. we were played.

    My suggestion was ...best not to feed it. Should be interesting to see what the mods do, up to them to shut it down, and let us save some pride.
    I believe the mods will understand sarcasm...
  3. by   nursemike
    Quote from pmcgrady
    omg you guys got me. Im baiting you guys into a debate and I stole my graduate research topic on something I didn't know...my topic, which isn't broad at all and totally deserving of a graduate level paper, is that nursing is understaffed because of corporate America. Nobel peace prize material.
    I don't spend as much time on these boards as I once did--part of an ongoing fight against internet addiction--but when I come here, I try to make it a rule not to waste a lot of time guessing a poster's motives, or what they really mean. I can very easily see why some people thought (and some probably still do) that this was "research" for a class. And it's clear from some of your subsequent posts that you had some ideas on the topic when you began. Then again, I have a Y chromosome and subtle nuances confuse me, so I find life a lot simpler if I just take most things at face value.
    That said, the original question of this thread is one that gets discussed a lot--even offline. I think there is almost a universal consensus that there is something(s) wrong with our profession. I have to confess, in my present context, I don't find matters as dire as I once did. I feel there are real problems worth addressing, but I also suspect that would be true doing QC in a pie factory.
    Still, I think I have an answer to the question posed, though I'm much less confident of a solution. The biggest problem in nursing today--indeed, in all of healthcare--is: THE OPIOID CRISIS!!! And, by that, I mean very damned little to do with the actual opioid crisis, but rather the knee jerk stupidity that has been both a cause of and response to said crisis, and by that I mean a long and pitiful history of healthcare regulation by people who know next to nothing about healthcare. Pain is not and never was a fifth vital sign, and a Pyxis buffet is not and never was the answer, and you could probably count one one hand the healthcare professionals who ever thought so, but the very last thing the media or the suits could ever believe is that doctors and nurses usually have a pretty good idea how much pain you are in, or what to do about it. And it's the same story with pretty much everything we do.
    When I admit a patient with a stroke at 0340, one of the questions I must ask is: what can you tell us about yourself that will make your care more individualized? And with whatever cognition that patient has, he or she is thinking, "Oh, my God, I'm in the hospital! Am I going to die?" And so I chart, "Likes chocolate pudding." Because, you know, actually getting to know someone and learning what they need takes more time than the suits can afford.
    I started this post as a reply to ExpNurse_RN, then abandoned it because I needed more time to mull it over, but I think she (?) touched on the best solution I can see with the why can't we all just get along idea. I have some ideas why we sometimes don't: we are all often under a lot of stress; most of us really believe what we do is important; we're inclined to take it personally even more than we probably ought to. A fellow nurse who appears indifferent is an affront to our core beliefs--and perhaps rightly so, although maybe we shouldn't be too quick to assume indifference. A fellow nurse makes a stupid mistake--we all know the potential for disaster, there. Still...
    Another thread I've recently seen asked something along the lines of what do you love about nursing, and I can't help thinking that's a critical part of addressing what's wrong with nursing. Has a lot to do with my own experiences in the past couple of years. To make a long story short (yeah, I know, that shipped sailed awhile ago) I love nurses. The ones who took care of me while I was sick, and the ones I work with, and certainly not least the ones who've taken care of me at work, from my beginnings as a hapless newbie to more recently as a dead man walking.
    I once observed, only half in jest, that there is nothing in heaven or earth that three nurses working together can't accomplish. The hard part is getting three nurses to work together. I think this applies to standing up for our profession in the face of the powers that be, but even more so during the course of a routine shift. This is hard work, and it can be very lonely, at times. We see things a lot of people don't. We make choices that seem impossible. We put our asses and sometimes our souls on the line. And I am going to make every effort I can to realize as often as I can that the people I work with are doing the same thing. Which shouldn't be too difficult, since quite a few have done the same for me.
    Last edit by nursemike on Mar 8
  4. by   nursemike
    BTW: I believe the multiple paths to entry into nursing are one of its greatest strengths. In a field comprised almost exclusively of white women, we are a lot more diverse than most people think, because we come from such varied backgrounds.
  5. by   CrunchRN
    I love what you said Nursemike. You are so right in my opinion.
  6. by   Leader25
    The patient , because if you go the Planetree route they will be telling you what to do.
  7. by   PocketSize
    Quote from nursesunny
    The biggest problem in nursing is the focus on patient satisfaction and lack of personal responsibility. We are so scared of bad HCAP scores that we don't hold patient's accountable for their actions. Diabetics eating donuts you say? Must mean that nurse didn't educate them properly not that they are a noncompliant trainwreck....
    THIS.
  8. by   JKL33
    Quote from nursemike
    The biggest problem in nursing today--indeed, in all of healthcare--is: THE OPIOID CRISIS!!! And, by that, I mean very damned little to do with the actual opioid crisis, but rather the knee jerk stupidity that has been both a cause of and response to said crisis, and by that I mean a long and pitiful history of healthcare regulation by people who know next to nothing about healthcare.

    Quote from nursemike
    When I admit a patient with a stroke at 0340, one of the questions I must ask is: what can you tell us about yourself that will make your care more individualized? And with whatever cognition that patient has, he or she is thinking, "Oh, my God, I'm in the hospital! Am I going to die?" And so I chart, "Likes chocolate pudding." Because, you know, actually getting to know someone and learning what they need takes more time than the suits can afford.
    Seems like you about summed it up, Mike.
  9. by   missmollie
    Quote from pmcgrady
    What exactly is interesting. You tried to call me out for cheating on homework when I am trying to have a substantive conversation about advancing nursing as a profession. What exactly do you think I am trying to gain? The interesting part about you is with a doctorate and 40 years of experience you should at least be able to come up with one issue that you would like to see solved. But you'd rather troll my post and say that I have some nefarious agenda.
    No one is trolling you, and you are not posting anything substantial within the bedside nurse's experience. It's almost like...dare I say it....You've never been a bedside nurse.

    Do some research.

    google.com -> type in google scholar -> type in topic -> read peer reviewed articles for free.

    In the absolute stretch that you are a MSN educated nurse, you've obviously never been at bedside. Take a step down, grasshopper. You can't know what you haven't experienced.
  10. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Look at your original post from our point of view. Brand new poster with no credentials besides username posts the following:

    In Post Modern America, what is the most pressing issue we face as nurses? After deciding on an issue, can you come up with a solution or at least a foundation to begin tackling the issue? Excited to hear your responses!

    Those of us who have been here a while- esp. those of us who are educators, see the hallmarks of a student trying to get someone to do their homework for them. We see this ALL. The. Time.

    It smacks of homework- or at least a discussion posting topic. I'm still not convinced it is not. How about a link to the podcast?

    Sometimes, MMJ, you might see wrongly and conclude wrongly. This being so cock sure, without proof, in an accusatory manner, is one of the biggest problems in Nursing. The cure? Express your doubts nicely. Ask for the link nicely and first.
  11. by   allstressedout1
    I watched girls going back to get BSN. One would do everyone math online, one would do another class and so on. It bothered me.
  12. by   sallyrnrrt
    In my humble opinion, it is today's model in nursing education, woefully lacking in clinical experiences.....

    I understand the change, do not really agree with it, but that is probably reflected on my hospital based diploma program...

    That being said, I can not do enough to help new nurses, come along, it's a two way street, I get as much as I receive.
  13. by   Kratoswife
    Racial discrimination.

    Staff to patient ratio.

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