I've lost my passion for nursing..confused on what to ?

  1. I loved nursing at one point. I was a CNA for 5 years. I loved my job, now that I'm an lpn since February I hate it. I work in a nursing home and it's gett to me. Overall it's a great company I just always feel I'm walking on eggshells. I feel less than a nurse and incompetent. I'm introverted and it doesn't help. I'm constantly stressed at work. When I ask questions I wish I didn't at times because that's just a chance to make me look stupid to seasoned nurses. I can't even blame it on my job. It's just me, I don't think I'm cut out for nursing. I'm scared every mistake I make will hinder my license. I spend my whole day off thinking about working the next day. I planned to go back for my BSn but now I'm unsure.
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  2. Visit mzsuccess profile page

    About mzsuccess

    Joined: Oct '12; Posts: 289; Likes: 93

    12 Comments

  3. by   quiltynurse56
    You are new to the job and right now you are learning it as well as being new to nursing. When I work LTC, I will make out a schedule of what I need to do when. Not detained but general. I would get there at 2 p.m.
    2-4 Report, rounds and vitals
    4-5 blood sugars and the coumadin that was scheduled at this time
    5-5:30 Supper maybe
    5:30 - 6 or 6:30 Supper med pass
    until 7, charting, reviewing orders, labs, and such
    7-8:30 bedtime med pass
    9, scheduled meds that patients requested to be given at this time
    Then charting until end of shift at 10

    Now, you also need to be flexible in case some thing comes up. Fortunately, we did not have to chart on everyone every shift.

    Ask for packets of the paper or the procdures you need for things like falls, sending someone to the hospital, death, etc that come up but not every day. If you have the packet of paper or written down and kept the steps, you can keep that handy to refer to when you need it.

    Ask other nurses for help. It will take a good year to feel comfortable in the job.

    If you do decide that bedside in LTC is not for you, there are other things you can do. Work in an office. Home health, Private duty nursing are some. I left LTC and am doing private duty pediatric nursing and love it.
  4. by   brownbook
    It took me about two years as a new RN with absolutely NO nursing experience, not even as a CNA, to feel competent and not be walking on eggshells.

    There are so many posts like yours. It is unfortunately, just a part of working as a new LVN or RN. It is scary, you hate to feel incompetent, you think you should know everything, you hate to ask questions, etc. You feel bad, sad, incompetent, you lose all your self confidence, you ask "stupid" questions because you don't trust yourself, you feel stupid for asking a stupid questions, "wash, rinse, repeat".

    Thousand of new grads feel like you. Just put "first year nurse feeling incompetent" in the Allnurses search box and you will get 100's of hits.

    Don't give up, it will get better. I used to go to work thinking, "I hope I make a huge med error and get fired so I won't have to do this job anymore". It actually took some of the pressure off!

    Face the worst ........... (you will make a huge error and get fired from your awful job)
    Believe the best......... (your a good nurse and you will be fine)
    Do the most ....... (don't rush, remember the 5 rights of medication administration)
    And leave the rest........ (obsessive worrying doesn't help)
  5. by   mzsuccess
    Quote from quiltynurse56
    You are new to the job and right now you are learning it as well as being new to nursing. When I work LTC, I will make out a schedule of what I need to do when. Not detained but general. I would get there at 2 p.m.
    2-4 Report, rounds and vitals
    4-5 blood sugars and the coumadin that was scheduled at this time
    5-5:30 Supper maybe
    5:30 - 6 or 6:30 Supper med pass
    until 7, charting, reviewing orders, labs, and such
    7-8:30 bedtime med pass
    9, scheduled meds that patients requested to be given at this time
    Then charting until end of shift at 10

    Now, you also need to be flexible in case some thing comes up. Fortunately, we did not have to chart on everyone every shift.

    Ask for packets of the paper or the procdures you need for things like falls, sending someone to the hospital, death, etc that come up but not every day. If you have the packet of paper or written down and kept the steps, you can keep that handy to refer to when you need it.

    Ask other nurses for help. It will take a good year to feel comfortable in the job.

    If you do decide that bedside in LTC is not for you, there are other things you can do. Work in an office. Home health, Private duty nursing are some. I left LTC and am doing private duty pediatric nursing and love it.
    How long were you in LTC?
    I'm trying to hang in there for at least six months so it doesn't look that bad on my resume. The only thing I'm trying to focus on is my med pass. Like yesterday someone bumped their back while on the toliet. It was 11:30 I was waiting for night nurse to give report but she was so busy talking. I didn't think it was a fall at all. I went in there to assess the patient because night nurse told me she fell back and hit herself while trying to wipe. I offered a heating pad,called POA,charted and left. No c/o pain was made. But when I left and came back I heard the nurses saying she didn't even take the vitals I had to. Which pissesme off. But I love peds I actually have an interview tomorrow todo peds homecare on the side
  6. by   mzsuccess
    Quote from brownbook
    It took me about two years as a new RN with absolutely NO nursing experience, not even as a CNA, to feel competent and not be walking on eggshells.

    There are so many posts like yours. It is unfortunately, just a part of working as a new LVN or RN. It is scary, you hate to feel incompetent, you think you should know everything, you hate to ask questions, etc. You feel bad, sad, incompetent, you lose all your self confidence, you ask "stupid" questions because you don't trust yourself, you feel stupid for asking a stupid questions, "wash, rinse, repeat".

    Thousand of new grads feel like you. Just put "first year nurse feeling incompetent" in the Allnurses search box and you will get 100's of hits.

    Don't give up, it will get better. I used to go to work thinking, "I hope I make a huge med error and get fired so I won't have to do this job anymore". It actually took some of the pressure off!

    Face the worst ........... (you will make a huge error and get fired from your awful job)
    Believe the best......... (your a good nurse and you will be fine)
    Do the most ....... (don't rush, remember the 5 rights of medication administration)
    And leave the rest........ (obsessive worrying doesn't help)
    Omg you just summed up everything I felt. Yes I feel very incompetent. I actually was feeling like if I got fired I wouldn't have to deal with it yesterday. The staff aren't welcoming and it's like they expect me to know everything. It's so easy to feel-by yourself.
  7. by   nursel56
    Just want to throw in with everyone else, mzsuccess . . . it is way too soon to decide. I'm an introvert, too. It can take a couple of years to feel you are on your game. The posters above gave great advice. Hang in there!
  8. by   brownbook
    Quote from mzsuccess
    How long were you in LTC?
    I only worked about 4 weeks in a LTC as a CNA. Then acute care med/surg as a new grad RN.

    Keep on working, it will get better. Keep applying to other jobs. LTC is the hardest! There are positions in outpatient surgery and acute care hospitals for LVN's. Get your BSN, with your experience you will be a great nurse.

    Good luck with the peds homecare interview.
  9. by   quiltynurse56
    [QUOTE=mzsuccess;9831565]How long were you in LTC?


    3 years, just left the end of last year for PDN Peds.

    Always use the times like you just mentioned as learning experiences. When you hear them talking about something you didn't quite do correctly, just say something like, "I am not sure I did everything right, what should I be doing or what should I have done better." This lets them know you are open to learning.
  10. by   Rocknurse
    The key to having control of your future is to get educated. By that I mean that if you continue your education it gives you power to have choices. Nursing is amazing because there are so many things you can do. You don't have to stay where you are unhappy. I worked for 4 years in a cardiac ICU. I loved it but I was burned out and exhausted and when I got my BSN I was offered a position in informatics. I wasn't looking, it just kind of dropped into my lap. I took it because I felt like I had lost the passion. Four years later I'm not really happy, and the passion that I once had for ICU is back with a vengeance and I want to go back. In the meantime I'm about to graduate with my NP. I kept moving forward and kept going to school. Now I have choices. All you have to do is decide where you want to go and aim for it.
  11. by   mzsuccess
    You guys I just don't know. Just when I spoke about being scared of making an error. I wasn't sure if I did or didn't yesterday. I was pulling meds and another nurse care up to me. Telling me another pt needed meds I told her ok then she kept coming right back. I told her I will as soon as I get a chance. So I was popping out her pills and I think I put gave 3 x 45 remeron instead of one because previously she had 15 and It would've gave her 45mg so when I flipped the cards back over and she had already swallowed the pills saying she had to go. Her caregiver saw the whole thing. I monitored her but still not sure. I'm off today so won't know until Wednesday.
  12. by   mzsuccess
    Reasons like this is why I don't want to be a nurse and don't think I'm cut out for nursing. The lady asked me about it.
  13. by   inthecosmos
    Quote from mzsuccess
    Reasons like this is why I don't want to be a nurse and don't think I'm cut out for nursing. The lady asked me about it.
    Mistakes happen. Making sure you're clear minded is key. Sounds like lots of distractions.
  14. by   mzsuccess
    Quote from inthecosmos
    Mistakes happen. Making sure you're clear minded is key. Sounds like lots of distractions.
    Yes thing is I'm not sure I made an error and didn't think to report

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