IV Pump frustration!

  1. I am a new grad who is frustrated and scared of IV pumps, hanging IVs etc.
    We didn't have a pump in our school lab. Now I'm new at a hosp. They say go find out why that pump is beeping.
    I just stand there and say "duh". Today I was at orientation, but had about 5min time to play with the buttons.
    Is there anywhere on the web where there is proper instruction for this????
    I like to do things right. Don't like to be unsure.
    It's embarrassing:imbar and possibly dangerous for the patients! Thanks, Nurscee
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    About nurscee

    Joined: May '04; Posts: 123; Likes: 5

    14 Comments

  3. by   Fiona59
    Do you mean IVAC's? There is usually a manual somewhere on the unit. Display also tells you what's up. Love "occulsion downstream" -- patient usually lying on the line.

    Approach the friendliest staffer on ur unit. They will share. Just pick a quiet time.
  4. by   UM Review RN
    If it's a Baxter pump, they have online education or a phone number you can call.

    http://learn.healthstream.com/accesspoint/baxter/

    I tried to register and it didn't work so you might have to call the phone number listed on that website.

    If it's a different type of pump, they also might have an online tutorial for it.

    Ain't the Internet GRAND??
  5. by   meownsmile
    The plumb pumps have some use instructions on the side of the pump. And yes, there should be an instruction manual for the pumps on the unit someplace. Ask your nurse manager where it is if its not in your policy books on the unit.
  6. by   nurscee
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    If it's a Baxter pump, they have online education or a phone number you can call.

    http://learn.healthstream.com/accesspoint/baxter/

    I tried to register and it didn't work so you might have to call the phone number listed on that website.

    If it's a different type of pump, they also might have an online tutorial for it.

    Ain't the Internet GRAND??
    Thanks...I did try this site. Lots of great info about IVs, but sadly, no info on exactly HOW to operate a pump.
    I will try to find the manual at work. Thanks though, it was great of you to try.
  7. by   Kudra
    i know it's hard to speak up for your self when you're the new person on the floor... but if you're not comfortable with a basic piece of equipment (and by that, i mean something that you use ALL the time), then you need to say something to who ever is orientating you...

    either go to someone you trust on the floor and ask them to take the time to show you how to use the machine or tell your manager that you need more training... you need to speak up so you get the best learning experience possible... but not only that, it's VITALLY important to patient safety that you use the equipment properly!
  8. by   UM Review RN
    I wish you worked with me. I'd turn you into a pump whiz in about 10 minutes.
  9. by   Antikigirl
    OH goodness...it is almost like dealing with electronics of other types..ask a child! LOL! No but seriously...ask for a manual, or ask if another nurse can help you to understand it is my best advice! Most of the jobs I took on had a prep course in working with their equipment and inservices too (like for PIXIS, IV pumps, EKG monitors for cardiac units (how to set up on patient and change the batteries..LOL! Sometimes that seems to take a electronics degree! LOL!) ).

    Keep an eye out for inservices..and find the brand name and go to their website...talk about learning fast...it really helps to see what the manufacturer says! Thank goodness for the internet some times! LOL (you can even print off info and use it your next day!). Ask for some time with the machines in question...10 mins or so off shift or during down time....very important you know the equipment!

    But may I add one little pearl of wisdom here...equipment is great..but ALWAYS look at your patient not the machine! Pulse ox can be wrong, IV pumps can be wrong, EKG's can be wrong..always look at your patient for S/Sx of probelms first..then go figuring out the machinery if your patient is okay! Something I have learned over the years!
  10. by   sharann
    I wonder why you weren't inserviced during orientation on pumps and PCA machines. If you use more than 1 type they must inservice you or at least have a staffer ort you. I hate the plumpumps we use. They always make me feel like a new grad too!
  11. by   z's playa
    If I were you I would go in to my shift a little early and ask for help or take your time and figure it out by yourself where you won't be disturbed and there's no pt attached to the other end of you pump.

    No pt...no harm.

    Z
  12. by   rjflyn
    If all else fails -- get a bigger hammer.
    Seriously- you need to say something if you were not adequately oriented to the equipment. Not having the time is no excuse. Most places have so called super users for certain equipment. These persons know how to run these machines with there eyes closed. If all else fails you owe it to your patients to learn your tools so to speak- if you have to go in 10-15 mins early to get this info you should.

    Rj
  13. by   talaxandra
    The equipment can be really overwhelming until you know your way around it, but I promise that within a few weeks pump wrangling will be second nature
    I echo everyone else's great advice - ask, practice, and look at the patient. Good luck!
  14. by   rnmi2004
    Quote from nurscee
    I am a new grad who is frustrated and scared of IV pumps, hanging IVs etc.
    We didn't have a pump in our school lab. Now I'm new at a hosp. They say go find out why that pump is beeping.
    I just stand there and say "duh". Today I was at orientation, but had about 5min time to play with the buttons.
    Is there anywhere on the web where there is proper instruction for this????
    I like to do things right. Don't like to be unsure.
    It's embarrassing:imbar and possibly dangerous for the patients! Thanks, Nurscee
    The school can't teach you everything about every type of equipment you may come across in your nursing career. I know, it is very frustrating to hear this annoying beep and you're fumbling around, trying to look like you know what you're doing because the patient is right there. As a new grad in the hospital, you should have a preceptor willing to show you how to use the pumps.

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